Doomsday Scene: COVID-19, Flu, Measles, & Winter. Here's Our Plan Doomsday Scene: COVID-19, Flu, Measles, & Winter. Here's Our Plan

This winter may bring a surge in other illnesses besides COVID-19. A bioethicist tells how we should hope for the best but plan for the worst.Medscape Business of Medicine
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Family Medicine/Primary Care Commentary Source Type: news

Related Links:

We thank S. Ebmeier and A.J. Cunnington for their commentary on our editorial [1], providing another point of view on such a controversial topic. In their letter, S. Ebmeier and A.J. Cunnington assume that the greater burden of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) in adults may be related to the absence in the population of prior immunity to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), as occurred in fully susceptible populations during previous viral epidemics. In particular, Shanks et al. [2] report that the measles mortality rate in a fully susceptible population during the 1846 measles epidemic was higher...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Original Articles: Correspondence Source Type: research
Blood samples from children in Madagascar enabled predictions of a measles epidemic
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
(Natural News) The problem with the MMR, the measles-mumps-rubella combination vaccine, is that the attack of the measles itself, according to virologists, requires your immune system’s full attention, so the other virus strains overwhelm the body, and the hyper-response or “adverse event” can be tragic. Combination vaccines, like the MMR, are highly experimental, unpredictable, and...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
At long last, we have made a truly game-changing scientific breakthrough in preventing the spread of COVID-19. The impact of this breakthrough seems almost too good to be true. We have found a disease control tool that, when used properly, can dramatically reduce the person-to-person transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Studies have shown that this tool could reduce transmission by somewhere between 50% and 85%. The tool is cheap and remarkably low-tech. You can even make one at home. It has no significant side effects. And with each passing day, the scientific research showing the tool’s effec...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
The national immunisation programme is highly successful in reducing the incidence of serious and sometimes life-threatening diseases such as pneumococcal and meningococcal infections, whooping cough, diphtheria and measles. It remains important to maintain the best possible vaccine uptake to prevent a resurgence of these infections. This will also prevent increasing further the numbers of patients requiring health services, as well as outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases, and allow us to provide important protection to children and other vulnerable groups. Where possible, the routine immunisation programmes should be...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) A paper published by LSU Health New Orleans and Tulane University School of Medicine researchers suggests that live attenuated vaccines such as MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) may prevent the severe lung inflammation and sepsis associated with COVID-19 infection.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
[spotlight] National immunisation rates for children under five years have dropped dramatically over the period of South Africa's COVID-19 lockdown, sparking fears of an outbreak of deadly childhood infectious diseases including measles.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Condition:   Coronavirus (COVID-19) Intervention:   Sponsor:   Ain Shams University Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
More News: COVID-19 | Infectious Diseases | Measles | Primary Care