Sleep Apnea Rate Higher in Patients With Cervical Spondylosis Sleep Apnea Rate Higher in Patients With Cervical Spondylosis

Cervical spondylosis may nearly double patients'risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a new study suggests.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

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(RMIT University) The patented muscle toning technology is based on molecules of tetanus toxin, modified to ensure they work around the tetanus vaccine, and offers hope of a therapeutic alternative for the estimated 1 billion people worldwide who suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
ConclusionThe results of this meta-analysis indicated no significant effect of surgical treatments for snoring or OSA on glottic functioning and nasalance parameters, regardless of surgery type. Further prospective studies are needed to assess more parameters for detailed acoustic analyses.
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Abstract OBJECTIVE: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome has been identified as a possible risk factor for optic nerve pathology such as glaucoma, nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy, and optic disk edema. Accordingly, we aimed to evaluate structural changes of the apparently normal optic nerve in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients with effects of its severity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective case-control study, 47 eyes of 47 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients diagnosed with polysomnography and 40 eyes of 40 healthy subjects were included. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography w...
Source: European Journal of Ophthalmology - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Eur J Ophthalmol Source Type: research
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Source: Cranio - Journal of Craniomandibular and Sleep Practice - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionCross motor innervation of the hypoglossal nerve occurs in approximately 50% of humans, which is associated with a positive effect on PSG outcomes. Bilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve may be a solution for non-responding patients with pronounced collapse at the soft palate during drug-induced sleep endoscopy.
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Respiratory Medicine Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Cross motor innervation of the hypoglossal nerve occurs in approximately 50% of humans, which is associated with a positive effect on PSG outcomes. Bilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerve may be a solution for non-responding patients with pronounced collapse at the soft palate during drug-induced sleep endoscopy. PMID: 32488573 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Sleep and Breathing - Category: Sleep Medicine Authors: Tags: Sleep Breath Source Type: research
Colonoscopy is currently one of the preferred screening modalities for colon cancer in the US being advantageous due to allowing direct visualization, ability to perform polypectomy and biopsies. Different sedation modalities are available to perform the procedure but there has been a shift to the use of deep sedation for the past decade due to its association to higher patient satisfaction; the evidence is lacking in terms of other benefits. In special patient populations, such as morbid obese and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), there is an indication to use deep sedation, however, there is little evidence to support its p...
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Poster abstracts Source Type: research
Millions of screening colonoscopies are performed annually which means there is a substantial health cost for insurances. There has been more utilization of deep sedation requiring costly anesthesia services compared to moderate sedation given severity of systemic diseases, increased comfort, satisfaction, and ease of scoping for the endoscopist. Typically, obese patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have required deep sedation, however many are able to utilize moderate more safely. Here we assess respiratory complications in deep and moderate sedation in high risk patients who have obesity and OSA undergoing a screening colonoscopy.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Poster abstracts Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: A higher AHI in the supine position may be predictive of FES. CPAP therapy might reverse FES and patients with non-reversible FES appear to have more severe OSA and a worse airway access. PMID: 32482105 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Eye Research - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Curr Eye Res Source Type: research
An 81-year-old man presented to the clinic for an annual general medical examination with insomnia and pruritus. His insomnia was associated with nocturnal leg restlessness, foot cramping, and pruritus of his feet. His cramping was not associated with activity and occurred mostly at night. He reported no fevers, weight loss, night sweats, numbness, skin lesions, or purulence. His medical history included obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treated with continuous positive airway pressure therapy, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, bilateral chronic onychomycosis of the toenails (recently completed tre...
Source: Mayo Clinic Proceedings - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Residents ’ Clinic Source Type: research
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