Maternal and fetal outcomes of Asian pregnancies after bariatric  surgery

Obesity is a risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and large gestational age pregnancy. Bariatric surgery is widely accepted to treat obesity but associated with small for gestational age fetuses.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research

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Obesity is a risk factor for pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), Pre-Eclampsia (PE), Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Large Gestational Age (LGA) pregnancy. Bariatric surgery is widely accepted to treat obesity but associated with small for gestational age (SGA) fetuses.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Original articles Source Type: research
Right now, one in 12 children and adolescents in the US are severely obese. If that isn’t startling enough, consider this: among 12-to-15-year-olds, that number jumps to one in 10 — and among 16-to-19-year-olds, it is one in seven. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the best hope for many of these youths may be bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery is surgery that helps with weight loss by making the stomach smaller and making other changes in the digestive system. It’s jarring to think about doing irreversible surgery on an adolescent — or a child, as the AAP discourages age limi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Adolescent health Children's Health Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Parenting Source Type: blogs
AbstractEmerging evidence suggests that bariatric surgery improves pregnancy outcomes of women with obesity by reducing the rates of gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, and macrosomia. However, it is associated with an increased risk of a small-for-gestational-age fetus and prematurity. Based on the work of a multidisciplinary task force, we propose clinical practice recommendations for pregnancy management following bariatric surgery. They are derived from a comprehensive review of the literature, existing guidelines, and expert opinion covering the preferred type of surgery for women of childbearing age...
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to investigate the association between pregnancy after bariatric surgery and adverse perinatal outcomes. Methods and findingsSearches were conducted in Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Scopus, and Google Scholar from inception to June 2019, supplemented by hand-searching reference lists, citations, and journals. Observational studies comparing perinatal outcomes post-bariatric surgery to pregnancies without prior bariatric surgery were included. Outcomes of interest were perinatal mortality, congenital anomalies, preterm birth, postterm birth, small and large f...
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Bianca Cox1†, Maria Tsamou1†, Karen Vrijens1, Kristof Y. Neven1, Ellen Winckelmans1, Theo M. de Kok2, Michelle Plusquin1 and Tim S. Nawrot1,3* 1Center for Environmental Sciences, Hasselt University, Hasselt, Belgium 2Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands 3Department of Public Health, Environment and Health Unit, Leuven University (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium Maternal body mass index (BMI) before pregnancy is known to affect both fetal growth and later-life health of the newborn, yet the implicated molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. As the master reg...
Source: Frontiers in Genetics - Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: research
ConclusionsBariatric surgery is a successful treatment of maternal obesity, but certain surgery-specific risks may exist. More data are needed to determine clinical guidelines. The long-term effects of surgery on pregnancy outcomes are unknown.
Source: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics - Category: Nutrition Source Type: research
Katherine Samaras1,2,3*, Henrik Tevaerai4, Michel Goldman5, Johannes le Coutre6,7 and Jeff M. P. Holly8 1Department of Endocrinology, St Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia 2Diabetes and Metabolism, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia 3St Vincent's Hospital, St Vincent's Clinical School, Darlinghurst, NSW, Australia 4Bern University Hospital, Bern, Switzerland 5Institute for Interdisciplinary Innovation in Healthcare, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium 6Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom 7Nes...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02139813, and is now completed.FindingsFrom May 13, 2014, to March 2, 2016, of 261 patients screened for eligibility, 253 (97%) were randomly assigned to OAGB (n=129) or RYGB (n=124). Five patients did not undergo their assigned surgery, and after undergoing their surgery 14 were excluded from the per-protocol analysis (seven due to pregnancy, two deaths, one withdrawal, and four revisions from OAGB to RYGB) In the per-protocol population (n=117 OAGB, n=117 RYGB), mean age was 43·5 years (SD 10·8), mean BMI was 43·9 kg/m2 (SD 5·6), 176 ...
Source: The Lancet - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
(Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2018;218(6):573–580) As obesity rates rise, rates of pregnant women who are overweight or obese have increased. Obesity is associated with adverse obstetric and neonatal outcomes, including gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, and increased risk of cesarean delivery. Weight loss before pregnancy is recommended to prevent these risks. With an increase in the number of reproductive-age women undergoing bariatric surgery, this study aimed to evaluate the benefits and risks of bariatric surgery on obstetric and neonatal outcomes.
Source: Obstetric Anesthesia Digest - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Editorials and Reviews Source Type: research
Background: Approximately 30% of reproductive age women in the United States are obese. Maternal obesity is associated with an increased risk of many complications including gestational diabetes mellitus, hypertension, preterm delivery, and fetal macrosomia. As a result, weight reduction in the pre-pregnancy period has become imperative for both maternal and fetal health. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) recognizes bariatric surgery as a promising pre-pregnancy obesity treatment.
Source: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases - Category: Surgery Authors: Source Type: research
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