Ohio doctor threatened after pro-vaccine Tik Tok video

An Ohio doctor who received a flood of threats over a pro-vaccine social media post is standing by her message. In a playful Tik Tok video, Dr. Nicole Baldwin showed the benefits of vaccines, and said they do not cause autism. But that prompted a barrage of hateful responses. Despite scientific evidence that there ’s no link between vaccines and autism, a recent poll found 46% of parents are still unsure. Dr. Jon LaPook joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss how doctors can counter misinformation about vaccines.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: Available online 10 February 2020Source: Journal of Health EconomicsAuthor(s): Mengcen Qian, Shin-Yi Chou, Ernest K. LaiAbstractSince Wakefield et al. (1998), the public was exposed to mixed information surrounding the claim that measles–mumps–rubella vaccine causes autism. A persistent trend to delay the vaccination during 1998–2011 in the US was driven by children of college-educated mothers, suggesting that these mothers held biases against the vaccine influenced by the early unfounded claim. Consistent with confirmatory bias, exposures to negative information about the vaccine streng...
Source: Journal of Health Economics - Category: Health Management Source Type: research
The TWiVerers continue their coverage of the new coronavirus outbreak in China, as the number of cases increase dramatically and the virus begins person-to-person transmission in other countries. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode ASV 2020 Real time tracking of 2019-nCoV (JHU) Estimation of 2019-nCoV R0 (Int J Inf Dis) WHO Sitreps on 2019-nCoV Coronavirus overtakes SARS (SCMP) HHS press conference Discovery of 201...
Source: This Week in Virology - MP3 Edition - Category: Virology Authors: Source Type: podcasts
On Sunday 3 November, OUC’s Dr Alberto Giubilini participated in a debate on compulsory vaccination at 2019 Battle of Ideas Festival (Barbican Centre, London). Chaired by Ellie Lee, the session also featured Dr Michael Fitzpatrick (GP and author, MMR and Autism: what parents need to know and Defeating Autism: a damaging delusion); Emilie Karafillakis (Vaccine Confidence Project); and Nancy McDermott (author, The Problem with […]
Source: blog.bioethics.net - Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Tags: Health Care Alberto Giubilini's Posts children choice Debate medical ethics public discourse responsibility syndicated vaccination Video Series Source Type: blogs
In a cohort of 657 461 children born in 1999 –2010, no association between the measles mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccination and autism was observed. Despite this, it is unclear whether increasing medical evidence and facts about the lack of association between the MMR vaccination and autism will have beneficial impact in easing the minds of p arents and preventing unnecessary deaths. Prior to the availability of a measles vaccination in 1963, the majority of children contracted measles by the age of 15. Approximately 3–4 million US citizens were infected annually, with about 400–500 deaths, 48 000 hospital...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
An Ohio doctor who received a flood of threats over a pro-vaccine social media post is standing by her message. In a playful TikTok video, Dr. Nicole Baldwin showed the benefits of vaccines, and said they do not cause autism. But that prompted a barrage of hateful responses. Despite scientific evidence that there ’s no link between vaccines and autism, a recent poll found 46% of parents are still unsure. Dr. Jon LaPook joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss how doctors can counter misinformation about vaccines.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
In 2019, 84% of Americans think vaccinating children is important, down from 94% in 2001; 10% still believe vaccines can cause autism, according to a new Gallup survey.Medscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news
The rise of vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as measles and hepatitis, in the United States and around the globe has been alarming in recent years. For women — especially those hoping to become pregnant, as well as women who are pregnant or have recently had a baby — vaccines can be a worrisome topic. There are many misconceptions about vaccine safety in and around pregnancy that can lead to confusion and unnecessary fear of a lifesaving medical tool. As a practicing ob/gyn, I often discuss vaccines with my patients and help them sort out fears versus facts. Which vaccines should you consider before concepti...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Parenting Pregnancy Vaccines Women's Health Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSION: One in six caregivers who participate in a national research cohort believe that child immunizations could be a cause of autism in their child. Parent social background (non-White, less educated) and child developmental features (regression in second year, poorer language skills, and worse adaptive outcomes) index caregivers who are more likely to harbor these beliefs and could benefit from targeted educational activities. PMID: 31924427 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Vaccine - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Vaccine Source Type: research
As the measles virus continues to spread worldwide, Samoan Prime Minister Tuilaepa Lupesoliai Sailele Malielegaoi announced Monday that Samoa will take the dramatic step of closing its government for two days this week to assist with a public vaccination campaign. Aside from 2019, Samoa has reported almost no cases of measles to the World Health Organization (WHO) in recent years. But vaccine coverage in the small nation is lacking, partially attributable to public concern following two vaccine-related deaths that occurred in 2018 due to faulty formulas, the WHO reports. As of 2018, only 31% of children had received one of...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized samoa Source Type: news
(Natural News) It is fast becoming a digital “crime” to even just comment on social media with opinions that the Big Tech “deep state” says are “inaccurate” or “offensive.” Whether it is honest expressions of skepticism about vaccine safety or basic questions about the biological inconsistencies of transgenderism, Big Tech corporations want these and other...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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