Canada's Ebola vaccine almost didn't happen, new study reveals

Dalhousie University professor Matthew Herder accessed hundreds of government documents to find out what really happened as Canadian scientists tried for years to get the pharmaceutical industry interested in their discovery of an Ebola vaccine.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

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Authors: Graul AI, Pina P, Tracy M, Sorbera L Abstract Highlights of our annual review of new approvals and launches on global drug markets include the approval and launch of Trikafta, the most widely applicable treatment to date for cystic fibrosis; approval of the first Ebola vaccine for general (rather than emergency) use; the pilot rollout in three African countries of the world's first malaria vaccine; approval of a new treatment option for multidrug-resistant bacterial infections; and the approval and launch in China of the first new drug to treat Alzheimer's disease in more than a decade. Several new immune ...
Source: Drugs of Today - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Drugs Today (Barc) Source Type: research
[UN News] Four countries in Africa have licensed an Ebola vaccine to "cement hard-fought progress" in keeping their people safe from the deadly disease, the UN health agency said on Friday.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
[WHO] The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Burundi, Ghana and Zambia have licensed an Ebola vaccine, just 90 days after World Health Organization (WHO) prequalification. Registration of the vaccine is expected in additional countries in the coming weeks.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
Four countries in Africa have licensed an Ebola vaccine to “cement hard-fought progress” in keeping their people safe from the deadly disease, the UN health agency said on Friday.
Source: UN News Centre - Health, Poverty, Food Security - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
ConclusionWith advanced training and adherence to infection prevention and control practices, clinical interventions, including critical care, are feasible and safe to perform in critically ill patients. With specific anti-Ebola medications, most patients can survive Ebola virus infection.
Source: Intensive Care Medicine - Category: Intensive Care Source Type: research
This study reveals markers of viral persistence and provides promising approaches for development and evaluation of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID: 32053790 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Cell Host and Microbe - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Cell Host Microbe Source Type: research
By Dr. Lisa Stone, Epidemiology Adviser ; Robert Salerno, Director, Global Health Security Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama, June 6, 2018, as part an Emerging Infectious Diseases Training Event (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen).February 11, 2020A disease spillover event, when a virus moves from animal to human hosts, can cause significant human illness. The coronavirus (COVID-19) seems to have spilled over sometime in late 2019, at a wildlife market in Wuhan, China, leading to more than 40,000 confirmed cases and at least 910 reported deaths&nbs...
Source: IntraHealth International - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Infectious Diseases Global Health Security Source Type: news
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., February 11, 2020 – Johnson &Johnson today announced that its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies will further expedite its investigational coronavirus vaccine program through an expanded collaboration with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) at the U.S. Department of Health &Human Services. The collaborative partnership with BARDA builds on Johnson &Johnson’s multipronged response to the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. In addition to Janssen’s effor...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news
As the deadly 2019-nCov coronavirus spreads, raising fears of a worldwide pandemic, researchers and startups are using artificial intelligence and other technologies to predict where the virus might appear next — and even potentially sound the alarm before other new, potentially threatening viruses become public health crises. “What we’re doing currently with Coronavirus is really trying to get an understanding of what’s happening on the ground through as many sources as we can get our hands on,” says John Brownstein, chief innovation officer at Boston Children’s Hospital and a professor...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV coronavirus MSFTAI2019 onetime Source Type: news
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news
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