Employees who have 'burn out' at a 20 per cent increased risk of suffering atrial fibrillation

In a study of 11,000 people by the University of Southern California, exhausted and stressed-out workers were at a 20 per cent increased risk of suffering atrial fibrillation later in life.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Discussion From Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Ann Intern Med. 2019 Dec 03;171(11):828-836 Authors: Burns RB, Zimetbaum P, Lubitz SA, Smetana GW Abstract Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia, affecting 2.7 million to 6.1 million persons in the United States. Although some persons with AFib have no symptoms, others do. For those without symptoms, AFib may be detected by 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG), single-lead monitors (such as ambulatory blood pressure monitors and pulse oximeters), or consumer devices (such as wearable monitors and smartphones). Pulse pa...
Source: Annals of Internal Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Tags: Ann Intern Med Source Type: research
TIME held its first TIME 100 Health Summit on Thursday aiming to define — and shape — the future of health care. The Summit, which is an offshoot of the magazine’s annual TIME 100 list of influential people, featured scientists, politicians and entertainers, such as former President Bill Clinton, former Vice President Al Gore, NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins, actress Selma Blair, NBA commissioner Adam Silver, comedian Tig Notaro and former Planned Parenthood President Dr. Leana Wen. The day included a range of interviews, panels and performances. Here are the biggest moments from the Summit. Former Vice ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Comedy HealthSummit19 onetime Source Type: news
From SWOLF through EDA until heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, single-lead ECG, period tracking, sleep pattern analyzing: dozens of vital signs demonstrate that there’s no single square centimeter of the human body without quantifiable data. As an experiment, we tried to collect every trackable parameter to draw the boundaries of your “health data self”. Let us know if there’s anything left out. Why is measurement useful? To know thyself The famous ancient Greek aphorism was inscribed on a wall in the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, the oracle, which was believed to tell human...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Personalized Medicine Portable Diagnostics activity blood body brain breathing data fitness health data heart health heart rate lifestyle lung measure measurement meditation quantified self s Source Type: blogs
Abstract Tobacco smoking continues to be a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the leading avoidable cause of death worldwide. Tobacco smoking has declined in high-income countries, but the average smoking rate in Japan remains high: 29.4% for men and 7.2% for women in 2017. Of note, the average smoking rate among middle-aged men remains approximately 40%, indicating that a high incidence of smoking-related CVD will continue for a couple of decades in Japan. The adverse effects of tobacco smoking on CVD are more extensive than previously thought. Physicians should be particularly alert to the de...
Source: Circulation Journal - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circ J Source Type: research
IN THIS EDITION of the journal, Sun et al.1 present their experience of providing anesthesia for thoracoscopic left atrial maze procedure for the treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation. The authors should be congratulated for openly presenting their results because it invariably opens one up to criticism, but also may provide a template for others whose institutions are embarking on these procedures.
Source: Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
Conclusions: Up to date, no data about PCIS and IVT are available from RTCs. Based on limited results from retrospective clinical studies and case series, IVT is safer for use in PCIS than in ACIS. Patients with brainstem ischemia, vertebral artery occlusion, and absence of basilar or posterior cerebral artery occlusion could be considered for treatment with IVT even in borderline cases. Time to IVT in PCIS seems to be a less crucial factor than in ACIS. IVT for PCIS may be beneficial even after 4.5 h from symptom onset. Introduction History of Intravenous Thrombolysis—The Most Relevant Studies Intravenous t...
Source: Frontiers in Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Joan has left an excellent comment on my recent 2019 AF ablation update. She brings up many important issues. Let’s dissect it. Q: Joan asks if it is common to see patients who think they are cured after AF ablation but are still in AF?  A: The scenario I described in my previous post is not common, but it is not rare. Since AF ablation entails much instrumentation and many burns, it can affect how the heart feels things. The heart has its own nervous system; yes, the heart feels. Also, the bigger the procedure, the bigger the placebo effect.  Q: If ablation doesn’t work, then I sure k...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
Most years I write an update on any big developments in AF ablation. This year’s version will be a short one. I have little new to report. But it’s worth reviewing some basic issues. We still do not know the cause of atrial fibrillation (AF). That makes it hard to fix with ablation. Knowledge Deficits: To explain why not knowing the cause of AF impairs our ability to ablate it, it’s useful to compare AF ablation to WPW ablation. Wolfe-Parkinson-White or WPW syndrome causes rapid heart rates because of an extra pathway from the top to the bottom (atria and ventricle) of the heart. You can cure WPW by ablat...
Source: Dr John M - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
By ANISH KOKA MD  The message comes in over the office slack line at 1:05 pm. There are four patients in rooms, one new, 3 patients in the waiting room. Really, not an ideal time to deal with this particular message. “Kathy the home care nurse for Mrs. C called and said her weight yesterday was 185, today it is 194, she has +4 pitting edema, heart rate 120, BP 140/70 standing, 120/64 sitting” I know Mrs. C well. She has severe COPD from smoking for 45 of the last 55 years. Every breath looks like an effort because it is. The worst part of it all is that Mrs. C just returned home from the hospital just days...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Policy Hospitals Medicare Anish Koka hospital readmissions HRRP MedPAC Source Type: blogs
This article was commented on at REBEL EM: http://rebelem.com/the-role-of-tee-in-cardiac-arrest/
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
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