Medical News Today: What does it mean when a scab turns yellow?

Scabs can turn yellow as a normal part of the skin ’s healing process. However, yellow scabs can sometimes indicate an infection, such as impetigo or herpes. Learn about the causes and treatment of yellow scabs and when to see a doctor here.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

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This study included 24 patients with Wolf's isotopic response after herpes zoster infection, which presented as manifestations ranging from inflammatory disease to carcinoma. Histopathological examinations in 12 patients and immunohistochemical analyses in 10 patients allowed exploration of secondary microscopic changes in the lesions. CD4+/CD8+ T-cell ratios were normal and infiltrating cells included mast cells, eosinophils, and tumour cells. Our study has described additional patients with confirmed Wolf's isotopic response following herpes zoster infection; moreover, it has extended the spectrum of Wolf's isotopic resp...
Source: Acta Dermato-Venereologica - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Acta Derm Venereol Source Type: research
Discussion Hypopigmentation can be worrisome for many families because of cosmesis and the worry that “something is wrong.” The normal natural changes in skin-tone over the year due to different light exposure and wide variations within individuals is not something that many people are aware of. Post-inflammatory hypopigmentation is a common cause of hypopigmentation. Vitiligo is the most common cause of depigmentation. Vitiligo is an acquired, depigmenting disorder with typical lesions appearing as milky white macules with distinct margins that are not scaly. Hair (including eyebrows and eyelashes) can be dep...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
This article reviews these infections based on their underlying etiology: bacterial, fungal, and viral causes. This article discusses the etiology, presentation, evaluation, and management of impetigo, bullous impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis, periorbital cellulitis, orbital cellulitis, folliculitis, furuncles, carbuncles, abscess, necrotizing fasciitis, sporotrichosis, tinea corporis, tinea pedis, tinea capitis, Herpes Simplex Virus, zoster, molluscum contagiosum, and warts. PMID: 30115333 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Primary Care - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Prim Care Source Type: research
This article reviews these infections based on their underlying etiology: bacterial, fungal, and viral causes. This article discusses the etiology, presentation, evaluation, and management of impetigo, bullous impetigo, erysipelas, cellulitis, periorbital cellulitis, orbital cellulitis, folliculitis, furuncles, carbuncles, abscess, necrotizing fasciitis, sporotrichosis, tinea corporis, tinea pedis, tinea capitis, Herpes Simplex Virus, zoster, molluscum contagiosum, and warts.
Source: Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
​BY NATALIE CAZEAU, ​MSC; ERICA ROMAN HERNANDEZ; KINZA IJAZ; AMY SCHEUERMANN; AHMED RAZIUDDIN, MDA 43-year-old man presented to the ED with a rash in a C7 dermatomal pattern that was burning and painful. The patient said the rash began three weeks before the ED visit as a group of little blisters on his right upper back and extending down his right arm. The patient was worried and in mild distress as the rash continued to burn, and he reported numbness to the area. He mentioned he had received the shingles vaccine in the past.​The patient's rash was yellow, crusty, and tender upon palpation. The area was hyperke...
Source: The Case Files - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: research
Clinical introduction A 36-year-old woman at 12 weeks of pregnancy with a personal history of severe atopic dermatitis presented to the ED with a widespread and painful skin eruption. On physical examination, there were clusters of monomorphic blisters and crusts (see figures 1 and 2). Question Laboratory tests were within normal range. What is the most likely diagnosis?Disseminated herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection Disseminated varicella-zoster virus infection Severe atopic dermatitis flare-up Bullous impetigo Answer:A Tzanck smear showed multinucleated giant cells, and PCR confirmed an HSV type 1 infection. Staph...
Source: Emergency Medicine Journal - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: EMJ Image Challenge Source Type: research
Authors: Sand FL, Thomsen SF Abstract A multitude of infectious diseases of viral (genital herpes, herpes zoster, genital warts and molluscum contagiosum), bacterial (syphilis, chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum, donovanosis, erysipelas, cellulitis and necrotising fasciitis, folliculitis, impetigo, bartholin gland abscess, trichomycosis and erythrasma), fungal (candidiasis and dermatophytosis) and parasitic (pediculosis pubis) origin may affect the vulvar area. Herein, we review the infections and their skin manifestations in the vulvar area. PMID: 28397528 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Source Type: research
Several dermatoses are typified by the formation of spaces (blisters; bullae) within or beneath the epidermis. These may be acellular or filled with particular species of inflammatory cells. Etiological categories include infectious, immune-mediated, genetic, drug-related, and idiopathic lesions. Examples of such disorders include impetigo, Herpes virus infections, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and pemphigoid gestationis, epidermolysis bullosa acquisita, IgA-related dermatoses, inherited epidermolysis bullosa variants, Hailey-Hailey disease, and porphyria cutanea tarda.
Source: Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology - Category: Pathology Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS:  Bullous impetigo should be considered in the differential diagnosis of common skin diseases presenting as blistersin pregnant women. PMID: 27617460 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dermatol Online J - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatol Online J Source Type: research
WAIKOLOA, HAWAII – Athletes who wrestle, play rugby, or engage in any sport “where there’s a grinding of skin on skin” are at risk for herpes simplex gladiatorum, according to Dr. Andrew Krakowski....
Source: Pediatric News - Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news
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