Electroconvulsive Therapy and Stroke in Affective Disorder Electroconvulsive Therapy and Stroke in Affective Disorder

Dr Peter Yellowlees discusses electroconvulsive therapy and later stroke in patients with affective disorders.Medscape Psychiatry
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry Commentary Source Type: news

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DiscussionAs detailed above, the “elements” in both a classical and a contemporary sense have effects on our mental health and are potentially modifiable aspects that can be harnessed as therapeutic interventions. The most robust interventional evidence currently available shows tentative support for several use of the elements via horticultural and nature-exposure therapy, green exercise/physical activity, sauna and heat therapy, balneotherapy, and breathing exercises. It should be noted that, in many cases, these interventions were not studied in definitive diagnosed psychiatric disorders and thus it is prema...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Authors: Kaliora SC, Zervas IM, Papadimitriou GN Abstract Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the oldest among the early biological treatments introduced in psychiatry, and the only one still in use. In this paper we attempt a brief presentation of ECT usage over the last 80 years, since it was originally introduced. It is a safe, well-tolerated, and highly effective treatment option for major psychiatric disorders, such as mood disorders and schizophrenia, especially when there is an acute exacerbation of psychotic symptoms or if catatonic symptoms are prominent. ECT has also been used successfully for the treatmen...
Source: Psychiatriki - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Psychiatriki Source Type: research
We examined the association between ECT and risk of incident or recurrent stroke. A cohort of 174 534 patients diagnosed with affective disorder between 2005 and 2016 in the Danish National Patient Registry were followed for stroke until November 2016. The association between ECT and stroke was analysed using Cox regression with multiple adjustment and propensity-score matching on sociodemographic and clinical variables. In 162 595 patients without previous stroke, 5781 (3.6%) were treated with ECT. The total number of patients developing stroke during follow-up was 3665, of whom 165 had been treated with ECT. In patients
Source: The British Journal of Psychiatry for Mental Science - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Br J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a safe and effective treatment for major depressive disorder, but cerebrovascular and cardiovascular complications, although rare, remain the most concerning. This is particularly notable in those with preexisting cerebrovascular disease, which impacts dynamic cerebral autoregulation. In these patients, the increased blood flow to the seizing portions of the brain induced by ECT potentially can reduce cerebral blood flow to ischemic areas, possibly causing adverse neurological events. The authors describe a patient with chronic cerebral ischemic disease, chronic anemia, and major depressi...
Source: The Journal of ECT - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Case Reports Source Type: research
In this issue of the journal, 2 case reports are presented that illustrate explicit influences of structural brain lesions on psychiatric symptoms. In both cases, the patients had preexisting, classically diagnosed psychiatric disorders—schizophrenia in the first case and bipolar I disorder in the second case. In the first case, a 61-year-old woman with chronic paranoid schizophrenia experienced a marked reduction in psychotic symptoms after bilateral frontal strokes. In the second case, a 60-year-old man who had experienced manic and depressive episodes since his 20s developed partial complex seizures after having r...
Source: Journal of Psychiatric Practice - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Clinical Case Discussions Source Type: research
Dear Colleagues: Welcome to the January-February 2018 issue of Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience (ICNS). This is a milestone year for us as it marks the beginning of our 15th year of publication! We are pleased to continue serving you, our valued readers and colleagues, by providing peer-reviewed, evidence-based information on the latest innovations in both research and clinical practice in the field of neuroscience. We’d like to thank those dedicated readers who have been with us since 2004, the year we launched the journal, and to welcome new readers who are just discovering ICNS and what it has to offer. We&rsq...
Source: Innovations in Clinical Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Current Issue Editor's Message: Issue Highlights Source Type: research
Conclusion In patients with affective disorders, we found a weak positive association between ECT and subsequent diagnosis of epilepsy in those younger than 40 years, and a weak negative association in patients older than 60 years. The associations might be subject to residual confounding from risk factors related to ECT.
Source: Brain Stimulation - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: The Journal of ECT - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
Conclusion In patients with affective disorders, we found a weak positive association between ECT and subsequent diagnosis of epilepsy in those younger than 40 years, and a weak negative association in patients older than 60 years. The associations might be subject to residual confounding from risk factors related to ECT treatment.
Source: Brain Stimulation - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionMorbidity and mortality events after ECT treatments were relatively low, supporting ECT as a low‐risk medical procedure.
Source: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
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