Eczema: Watch out for these six types of the itchy skin condition

ECZEMA is the name for a group of skin conditions that cause dry, irritated skin. The most common type of eczema, which is most often associated with the general term, is atopic dermatitis, or atopic eczema. However, there are also other forms of eczema, which have differing symptoms.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Coconut oil is a natural moisturizer. It can soothe dry, itchy skin resulting from eczema and help prevent infection. In this article, we look at how to use coconut oil for eczema, other benefits, and risks.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Atopic Dermatitis / Eczema Source Type: news
WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 -- Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, can be very difficult to control in some people. But the skin condition, which leads to dry, itchy and inflamed skin, is particularly problematic for black people, according to new...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
fer J Abstract Itch is an unpleasant symptom, affecting many dermatological patients. Studies investigating the occurrence and intensity of itch in dermatological patients often focus on a single skin disease and omit a control group with healthy skin. The aim of this multi-centre study was to assess the occurrence, chronicity and intensity (visual analogue scale 0-10) of itch in patients with different skin diseases and healthy-skin controls. Out of 3,530 dermatological patients, 54.3% reported itch (mean ± standard deviation itch intensity 5.5 ± 2.5), while out of 1,094 ...
Source: Acta Dermato-Venereologica - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Acta Derm Venereol Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Colloidal oatmeal has been shown to safely reduce itching and irritation associated with AD and the severity of dry skin. These benefits, mediated by colloidal oatmeal's natural components, help to restore and maintain skin barrier function. This compound is safe, well tolerated, and can be effective as adjuvant treatment in AD . Moisturizers can reduce the dependency on topical corticosteroids and their potential adverse effects. PMID: 30207438 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Giornale Italiano di Dermatologia e Venereologia - Category: Dermatology Tags: G Ital Dermatol Venereol Source Type: research
Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder in children. Often called eczema, AD is a papulosquamous eruption often characterized by pruritus and then the typical distribution and morphology of the rash (Saavedra  et al., 2013). Thus, an idiom often used by health care professionals to describe AD is “the itch that rashes.” Two leading organizations jointly authored an update on AD in 2012 (Schneider et al., 2013), and a third published several guidelines for the management of AD (Eichenfield et al. , 2013, 2014, 2015; Sidbury et al., 2014).
Source: Journal of Pediatric Health Care - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Practice Guidelines Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that SD and SRI are common in adults with AD, particularly those with severe diseases. Sleep disturbances and SRI should be considered when assessing burden of AD and therapeutic decisions. PMID: 30234614 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Dermatitis - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatitis Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: In our international cohort of 103 patients with AD, 78% reported concomitant pain and itch. The greatest pain burden occurred on the hands (odds ratio [OR], 0.77), perioral region (OR, 0.74), and toes (OR, 0.7), corresponding to regions with the greatest sensory nerve density. Pain was most commonly described as "burning" and "stinging," particularly when lesions were red, cracked, and dry. Its presence significantly interfered with sleep, leisure activities, and activities of daily living. Among the clinic cohort, we observed a strong Spearman correlation between objective Eczema Area and...
Source: Dermatitis - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatitis Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that SD and SRI are common in adults with AD, particularly those with severe diseases. Sleep disturbances and SRI should be considered when assessing burden of AD and therapeutic decisions. PMID: 30179976 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Dermatitis - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Dermatitis Source Type: research
Authors: Danby SG, Cork MJ Abstract Atopic dermatitis (synonym atopic eczema, AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disorder essentially characterised by a red "itchy" skin rash. The condition is prevalent around the world, affecting 15-30% of children and 2-10% of adults [Odhiambo et al.: J Allergy Clin Immunol 2009;124:1251-1258.e23]. The pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning AD are complex, broadly involving skin barrier dysfunction, an altered immune response (affecting both the adaptive and innate immune systems) and an unfavourable environment (external stressors) [Werfel et al.: J Allergy Clin Im...
Source: Current Problems in Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Tags: Curr Probl Dermatol Source Type: research
Little is known about the impact of sleep disturbances (SD) or sleep-related impairment (SRI) in adults with AD, or their relationship with severity of AD, itch and other predictors. We conducted a prospective online questionnaire-based study of 287 adults with AD, including assessment of AD severity by patient-oriented eczema measure (POEM), self-reported global AD severity, self-assessed eczema area and severity index (SA-EASI) and visual analog scale (VAS-) itch, and Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS) SD and SRI individual items and T scores.
Source: Journal of Investigative Dermatology - Category: Dermatology Authors: Tags: Clinical Research: Epidemiology of Skin Diseases Source Type: research
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