Super-resolution microscope reveals secrets of deadly Nipah virus

(University of British Columbia) The deadly Nipah virus and others like it assemble themselves in a much more haphazard manner than previously thought, new UBC research has found. The discovery could allow scientists to develop more effective vaccines and rule out many approaches to fighting these viruses.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

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Nipah virus is an emerging pathogenic paramyxovirus responsible for sporadic and isolated outbreaks of severe respiratory and neurologic disease in Southern Asia. As a zoonotic virus, disease can manifest in both animals and human with indigenous fruit bats acting as natural reservoirs of the virus. The effects of viral infection vary from acute respiratory distress to fatal encephalitis. There are currently no approved therapeutics or vaccines against the virus, and growing concerns that this highly pathogenic infection has the potential to cause larger epidemics capable of inflicting significant mortality burden.Like the...
Source: NIH OTT Licensing Opportunities - Category: Research Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Ochani RK, Batra S, Shaikh A, Asad A Abstract The Nipah virus was discovered twenty years ago, and there is considerable information available regarding the specificities surrounding this virus such as transmission, pathogenesis and genome. Belonging to the Henipavirus genus, this virus can cause fever, encephalitis and respiratory disorders. The first cases were reported in Malaysia and Singapore in 1998, when affected individuals presented with severe febrile encephalitis. Since then, much has been identified about this virus. These single-stranded RNA viruses gain entry into target cells via a process k...
Source: Infezioni in Medicina - Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infez Med Source Type: research
by Neeltje van Doremalen, Teresa Lambe, Sarah Sebastian, Trenton Bushmaker, Robert Fischer, Friederike Feldmann, Elaine Haddock, Michael Letko, Victoria A. Avanzato, Ilona Rissanen, Rachel LaCasse, Dana Scott, Thomas A. Bowden, Sarah Gilbert, Vincent Munster Nipah virus (NiV) is a highly pathogenic re-emerging virus that causes outbreaks in South East Asia. Currently, no approved and licensed vaccine or antivirals exist. Here, we investigated the efficacy of ChAdOx1 NiVB, a simian adenovirus-based vaccine encoding NiV glycoprotein (G) Bangladesh, in Syrian hamsters. Prime-only as well as prime-boost vaccination resulted i...
Source: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases - Category: Tropical Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
C. E. Mire et al.
Source: Emerging Infectious Diseases Journal - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Authors: Singh RK, Dhama K, Chakraborty S, Tiwari R, Natesan S, Khandia R, Munjal A, Vora KS, Latheef SK, Karthik K, Singh Malik Y, Singh R, Chaicumpa W, Mourya DT Abstract Nipah (Nee-pa) viral disease is a zoonotic infection caused by Nipah virus (NiV), a paramyxovirus belonging to the genus Henipavirus of the family Paramyxoviridae. It is a biosafety level-4 pathogen, which is transmitted by specific types of fruit bats, mainly Pteropus spp. which are natural reservoir host. The disease was reported for the first time from the Kampung Sungai Nipah village of Malaysia in 1998. Human-to-human transmission also occu...
Source: Veterinary Quarterly - Category: Veterinary Research Tags: Vet Q Source Type: research
(Thomas Jefferson University) Researchers developed a novel recombinant vaccine called NIPRAB that shows robust immunization against Nipah virus in animal models and may be effective against other viruses in the same family.
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news
Abstract Nipah virus (NiV) is a recently emerged paramyxovirus that causes acute respiratory illness and fatal encephalitis in a broad spectrum of vertebrates, including humans. Due to its high pathogenicity and mortality rates, NiV requires handling in biosafety level-4 (BSL-4) containment facilities and no effective vaccines or therapeutic agents are currently available. Since current diagnostic tests for detecting serum neutralizing antibodies against NiV mainly employ live viruses, establishment of more safe and robust alternative diagnostic methods is an essential medical requirement. Here, we have developed ...
Source: Biochemical and Biophysical Research communications - Category: Biochemistry Authors: Tags: Biochem Biophys Res Commun Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: Microbes and InfectionAuthor(s): Nazia Thakur, Dalan BaileyAbstractNipah virus is an emerging zoonotic paramyxovirus that causes severe and often fatal respiratory and neurological disease in humans. The virus was first discovered after an outbreak of encephalitis in pig farmers in Malaysia and Singapore with subsequent outbreaks in Bangladesh or India occurring almost annually. Due to the highly pathogenic nature of NiV, its pandemic potential, and the lack of licensed vaccines or therapeutics, there is a requirement for research and development into highly sensit...
Source: Microbes and Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
A global coalition set up to fight emerging epidemics has struck a $31 million deal with scientists at Japan's University of Tokyo to speed up work on a vaccine against a brain-damaging disease caused by the Nipah virus.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Purpose: Nipah virus (NiV), a paramyxovirus, causes febrile encephalitis and severe respiratory disease in humans and animals. Nipah virus outbreaks have been reported from Malaysia, Bangladesh, India and Singapore. The case positive in humans have been attributed to zoonotic transmission from pigs and bats, human-to-human transmission, and eating fruits or juices contaminated with bat secretions. At present no vaccines or drugs are available for those infected with NiV. Fruit bats of family Pteropodidae have been identified as the reservoir for NiV.
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Tags: 20.066 Source Type: research
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