Are we prepared for Ebola and other viral haemorrhagic fevers?

Are we prepared for Ebola and other viral haemorrhagic fevers? Aust N Z J Public Health. 2014 Oct;38(5):403-4 Authors: Cheng AC, Kelly H PMID: 25269974 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health - Category: Global & Universal Authors: Tags: Aust N Z J Public Health Source Type: research

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CONCLUSION: All examined treatments, although potentiality effective against COVID-19, need either appropriate drug development or clinical trial to be suitable for clinical use. PMID: 32251618 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: J Pharm Pharm Sci - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: J Pharm Pharm Sci Source Type: research
Many experts believe that this surge in new infectious diseases is being driven in part by some of humanity's most environmentally destructive practices.
Source: L.A. Times - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Source Type: news
By Esther NgumbiILLINOIS, United States, Apr 6 2020 (IPS) During a crisis, such as the novel coronavirus, whose impact changes with every passing minute, the urge to listen to and watch the news, and get firsthand insights and real time updates can be constant. Indeed, millions of Americans are frequently checking the news. I know I am. What I’ve noticed on three of the major TV stations I’ve watched across the day is the absence of diversity in the experts commenting on the pandemic. This is inexcusable. The United States is made up of people of many different races and ethnicities, many of whom are profession...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tags: Headlines Health North America TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news
[African Arguments] We governed nations hit by the Ebola crisis. We must tackle disease outbreaks, but also their root causes.
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - Category: African Health Source Type: news
MONDAY, April 6, 2020 -- A drug originally developed to treat Ebola is getting a second chance in the spotlight, as research teams in the United States, Asia and Europe race to test it against the new coronavirus. The drug, called remdesivir, has...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
(Texas A&M University) In the wake of the novel coronavirus pandemic, Texas A&M University chemist Wenshe Ray Liu and his research team have focused their lab solely on searching for drugs to treat COVID-19. The Liu group was the first to identify the antiviral drug remdesivir as a viable medicine to treat COVID-19 in a research study published in late January. The drug was originally developed in response to the 2014 Ebola pandemic.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
We knew a pandemic was coming at some point - it ’s kind of why we have the WHO. We have had various smaller scale tests of the international response to an infectious disease outbreak - Ebola in west africa being the most recent. After that, reports criticised the WHO's response - citing problems around the swiftness of their action, the lack of...
Source: The BMJ Podcast - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: podcasts
Among the first American workers to raise the alarm about a potential COVID-19 pandemic were flight attendants. In late January, as the virus spread outside the Chinese province of Hubei, airline crews staffing international flights to Asia began expressing concerns, asking for disinfection supplies and permission to self-quarantine if they thought they had been exposed. “We were begging to be allowed to wear masks,” one flight attendant for a major U.S. airline tells TIME. Two months later, as flight crews remain on the front lines of the fight against the virus, they fear airlines’ failure to heed their...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Among the first American workers to raise the alarm about a potential COVID-19 pandemic were flight attendants. In late January, as the virus spread outside the Chinese province of Hubei, airline crews staffing international flights to Asia began expressing concerns, asking for disinfection supplies and permission to self-quarantine if they thought they had been exposed. “We were begging to be allowed to wear masks,” one flight attendant for a major U.S. airline tells TIME. Two months later, as flight crews remain on the front lines of the fight against the virus, they fear airlines’ failure to heed their...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
UCLA Health is one of 75 sites around the globe participating in a clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health to test the effectiveness of a candidate antiviral drug against COVID-19.The drug, called remdesivir, was originally developed as a treatment for Ebola. Although it was found to be safe, it was not effective in treating patients with the disease. In laboratory tests, however, it appears to work against the SARS-CoV-2 virus that  causes COVID-19, which has raised hope that it may be effective against the coronavirus that has swept the globe, sickening and killing thousands.The clini...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
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