Pregnant women prescribed antibiotics that may harm baby

The CDC found that more doctors are treating their pregnant patients' urinary tract infections with one of two antibiotics that may cause birth defects, despite warnings against doing so issued in 2011.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Women presenting with simple recurrent UTIs should have a flow rate and post-void residual measured. Cystoscopy is not warranted and imaging is unlikely to be of value in the absence of symptoms of upper tract disease or gynaecological problems.Urol Int
Source: Urologia Internationalis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: Diabetes &Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &ReviewsAuthor(s): Anthony P. Sunjaya, Angela F. SunjayaAbstractAimsTo compare the clinical and glycemic profile as well as pregnancy complications and infant mortality among diabetic mothers in Indonesia.Materials and MethodsData was obtained from medical records of Internal-Medicine Clinic in Hermina Podomoro General Hospital during the period January-December 2015. Subjects were grouped into good and poor outcome groups based on infant mortality.ResultsForty-five subjects were obtained with an average age of 31...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Several infections have unique consequences or considerations in pregnancy. Some common infections such as urinary tract infections, influenza, sexually transmitted diseases, and vaginitis affect pregnant women differently than the general population, can cause pregnancy complications, and require treatments that are safe in pregnancy. Infections such as hepatitis B and C and human immunodeficiency virus can be transmitted vertically and therefore management focuses on decreasing perinatal transmission. Certain infections can be transmitted in utero and cause congenital infections. Classically, these were grouped together ...
Source: Primary Care: Clinics in Office Practice - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: Diabetes &Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research &ReviewsAuthor(s): Anthony P. Sunjaya, Angela F. SunjayaAbstractAimsTo compare the clinical and glycemic profile as well as pregnancy complications and infant mortality among diabetic mothers in Indonesia.Materials and MethodsData was obtained from medical records of Internal-Medicine Clinic in Hermina Podomoro General Hospital during the period January-December 2015. Subjects were grouped into good and poor outcome groups based on infant mortality.ResultsForty-five subjects were obtained with an average age of 31...
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research, EarlyView.
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research - Category: OBGYN Authors: Source Type: research
Global antibiotic use has risen 65% worldwide and 114% in low- and middle-income countries between 2000 and 2015 [1]. During pregnancy, anywhere from 20% to over 40% of women may receive a course of antibiotics [2, 3], and antibiotics account for 80% of medications used by pregnant women in the USA [4]. Although antibiotics in pregnancy can treat many infections, including bacterial vaginosis and urinary tract infections, they may also have unintended adverse consequences [4]. Given the ubiquitous exposure to antibiotics in pregnancy, even a small adverse effect of maternal antibiotic use on health outcomes in the mother o...
Source: European Respiratory Journal - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Tags: Editorials Source Type: research
Conclusion Diabetes in pregnancy has been found to increase rates of infant mortality. This study showed that patients with poor glycemic control are at a greater risk of infant mortality. Therefore increased monitoring and prenatal care as well as optimal glycemic control for patients with diabetes in pregnancy is recommended. Optimal glycemic control will lead to diabetic mothers with pregnancies of equal risk and similar outcomes to those of normal patients.
Source: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: The PHDC extract provided a better and more complete reflection of chronic drug exposures compared with the MCRs, especially when women sought care at facilities other than the antenatal care unit where they first attended, or when exposures occurred before the initial antenatal visit. The exception was antibiotics dispensed from ward stock to treat sexually transmitted and urinary tract infections. PMID: 29843860 [PubMed - in process]
Source: South African Medical Journal - Category: African Health Tags: S Afr Med J Source Type: research
Conclusion Anemia, influenza, urinary tract infection, preterm labor and hypertension should especially be prevented and treated to avoid hospital admissions during pregnancy, especially among pregnant women covered by SUS.
Source: Revista da Escola de Enfermagem da USP - Category: Nursing Source Type: research
ConclusionsIbuprofen was inferior to pivmecillinam for treating uncomplicated UTIs. More than half of the women in the ibuprofen group recovered without antibiotics. However, pyelonephritis occurred in 7 out of 181 women using ibuprofen. Until we can identify those women who will develop complications, we cannot recommend ibuprofen alone as initial treatment to women with uncomplicated UTIs. Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT01849926EU Clinical Trials Register (EU-CTR), EudraCT Number 2012-002776-14
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
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