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Is antacid use during pregnancy tied to childhood asthma?

(Reuters Health) - Pregnant women who take antacids may be more likely to have children who go on to develop asthma than their counterparts who don ’t take these medications, a research review suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

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BOSTON (CBS) – Health officials say the flu season may be peaking which hopefully means that cases will soon start to decline. There’s some evidence that this is happening in Massachusetts but only time will tell. That said it is still not too late to get a flu shot so please get one. People with flu symptoms often wonder when they should just stay at home or when they should see a doctor. If you have underlying medical conditions like asthma or heart disease or if you’re pregnant and you think you have the flu, call your doctor. They may want to treat you with anti-viral medication. Otherwise healthy o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Flu Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: Given the prevalence of prenatal APAP use and the importance of language development, these findings, if replicated, would suggest that pregnant women should limit their use of this analgesic during pregnancy. PMID: 29331486 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Eur Psychiatry Source Type: research
Pregnant women who take antacids may be more likely to have children who go on to develop asthma than their counterparts who don ’ t take these medications, a research review suggests.Reuters Health Information
Source: Medscape Allergy Headlines - Category: Allergy & Immunology Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news
Taking acid-suppressive drugs during pregnancy is associated with elevated asthma risk among offspring, according to a meta-analysis in Pediatrics. Researchers assessed eight observational...
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - Category: Primary Care Source Type: news
Conclusions Given the prevalence of prenatal APAP use and the importance of language development, these findings, if replicated, would suggest that pregnant women should limit their use of this analgesic during pregnancy.
Source: European Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Taking popular drugs for heartburn, a common complication of pregnancy, raised the risk of asthma in offspring.
Source: NYT Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy and Childbirth Asthma Children and Childhood Heartburn Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Source Type: news
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Source: Journal of Cellular Physiology - Category: Cytology Authors: Tags: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research
FDA data on pimavanserin show favorable risk profile Review finds little evidence of addictive power of gabapentinoids Use of montelukast for asthma linked with neuropsychiatric effects Open‐label trial finds psilocybin improves depressive symptoms Study finds antidepressant adherence varies little between physicians ADHD medication use during pregnancy linked with CNS disorders in infants Two tested doses of valbenazine found safe for tardive dyskinesia
Source: The Brown University Psychopharmacology Update - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Research Roundup Source Type: research
AbstractA bulk of literature demonstrated that respiratory allergy, and especially asthma, is prevalent in males during childhood, while it becomes more frequent in females from adolescence, i.e., after menarche, to adulthood. The mechanisms underlying the difference between females and males are the effects on the immune response of female hormones and in particular the modulation of inflammatory response by estrogens, as well as the result of the activity of various cells, such as dendritic cells, innate lymphoid cells, Th1, Th2, T regulatory (Treg) and B regulatory (Bregs) cells, and a number of proteins and cytokines, ...
Source: Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
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Source: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Source Type: research
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