Cataract surgery in older women may reduce risk of death, study shows

New study reveals a longer life might be an unexpected benefit of cataract surgery, the most frequently performed operation in the U.S. A large study of women links the eye procedure to a 60 percent lower risk of dying from all causes. Dr. Christopher Starr, an ophthalmologist at Weill Cornell Medical Center, joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the findings.
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Conclusion: Adjuvant intravitreal dexamethasone implant injections offer promising results in cases of BD with CME. It is effective in preserving the macular anatomy and vision particularly in transition to biological agents.Ophthalmologica
Source: Ophthalmologica - Category: Opthalmology Source Type: research
This is a case of high astigmatism in an otherwise healthy and viable 15-year-old PKP graft. The situation is not uncommon, especially as grafts get older. First, I would suggest getting topography to confirm that this is not an occurrence of ectasia in the graft, and to assess whether the astigmatism is regular or irregular.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Consultation section: Cataract Source Type: research
It is reassuring that the patient has clear grafts with corneal pachymetries that are within normal limits. I would get a corneal topography and evaluate the astigmatism. In addition, I would want to carefully examine the lenses to determine whether there are any cataracts accounting for more myopic shift in the left eye. I assume that there are no sutures in the steep area to remove. If there are sutures, tension can be adjusted with selective suture removal based on topography to decrease astigmatism.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Consultation section: Cataract Source Type: research
Given the age of the graft, a discussion of a repeat PKP is reasonable; however, with the stated health of the graft, I would prefer to salvage the current graft. I would therefore suggest taking the patient to the operating room and proceeding with a small wedge resection of the graft superotemporally in the left eye. Removing a small crescent of corneal tissue anteriorly and placing some sutures to reapproximate the graft –host junction will strengthen the graft–host junction and adjust the corneal astigmatism.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Consultation section: Cataract Source Type: research
This patient is experiencing keratoconus progression after successful penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) because the original disease still remains in the host cornea. The patient is unable to tolerate scleral contact lenses, indicating that other contact lens modalities are also unlikely to be successful.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Consultation section: Cataract Source Type: research
Because the corneal transplant grafts are clear and the patient is not able to tolerate contact lens correction, additional surgical treatment is indicated to further improve his visual function.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Consultation section: Cataract Source Type: research
A 40-year-old man, with a history of keratoconus and an ocular history of corneal transplants 15 years ago in both eyes, reported a gradual decline in visual acuity in the left eye over the course of the last several years, with increasing magnitude of cylinder in the refractive error. The patient is unable to wear rigid gas-permeable (RGP) contact lenses or scleral lenses, despite multiple trials over the years by numerous physicians. His corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) was 20/20 and 20/60 in the right eye and left eye, respectively.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Consultation section: Cataract Source Type: research
As an anterior segment specialist who performs across the full spectrum of eye diseases and complaints within this specialty, one of the things I appreciate most about this journal is our dedication to publishing high-quality articles on all aspects of the subject. I definitely believe that the Journal of Cataract&Refractive Surgery is the home of anterior segment research.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: From the editor Source Type: research
We saved our perhaps most controversial topic for this fourth editorial: analyzing astigmatic change following IOL-based surgery, that is, cataract surgery and refractive lens exchange. This topic is challenging for three major reasons:
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Guest editorial Source Type: research
We read with great interest the article by Slade et  al.,1 who report the performance of a femtosecond laser (Lensx, Alcon Laboratories, Inc.) when used for laser in situ keratomileusis flap creation. There are some concerns we would like to share.
Source: Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery - Category: Opthalmology Authors: Tags: Letter Source Type: research
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