Bartonella Seroepidemiology in Dogs from North America, 2008 –2014

BackgroundImproved understanding of Bartonella species seroepidemiology in dogs may aid clinical decision making and enhance current understanding of naturally occurring arthropod vector transmission of this pathogen. ObjectivesTo identify demographic groups in which Bartonella exposure may be more likely, describe spatiotemporal variations in Bartonella seroreactivity, and examine co‐exposures to other canine vector‐borne diseases (CVBD). AnimalsA total of 15,451 serology specimens from dogs in North America were submitted to the North Carolina State University, College of Veterinary Medicine Vector Borne Disease Diagnostic Laboratory between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2014. MethodsBartonella henselae, Bartonella koehlerae, and Bartonella vinsonii subspecies berkhoffii indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) serology results, as well as results from a commercial assay kit screening for Dirofilaria immitis antigen and Ehrlichia species, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, and Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies, and Ehrlichia canis, Babesia canis, Babesia gibsoni, and Rickettsia species IFA results were reviewed retrospectively. ResultsOverall, 3.26% of dogs were Bartonella spp. seroreactive; B. henselae (2.13%) and B. koehlerae (2.39%) were detected more frequently than B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii (1.42%, P 
Source: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine - Category: Veterinary Research Authors: Tags: Standard Article Source Type: research

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Committee Opinion No. 399: Management of Tick Bites and Lyme Disease During Pregnancy: (En français : Prise en charge des morsures de tiques et de la maladie de Lyme pendant la grossesse). J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2020 May;42(5):644-653 Authors: Smith GN, Moore KM, Hatchette TF, Nicholson J, Bowie W, Langley JM Abstract OBJECTIVE: Lyme disease is an emerging infection in Canada caused by the bacterium belonging to the Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato species complex, which is transmitted via the bite of an infected blacklegged tick. Populations of blacklegged ticks continue to expand and are now es...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 26 February 2020Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Seunghee Lee, Hyunkyoung Lee, Jung-Won Park, Soon-Seek Yoon, Hyun-Ji Seo, Jinhyeong Noh, Mi-Sun Yoo, Keun-Ho Kim, Yeojin Park, Yun Sang Cho, Byung Jae So
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
The incidence of tick-borne infections in the United States has risen significantly in the past decade. Ticks can transmit a variety of pathogens, including bacteria, protozoa, and viruses, that can cause serious illnesses. Therefore, the use of rapid, sensitive, and specific multiplex tests is important to identify the pathogen(s) in the acute phase and determine appropriate treatment to minimize the severity of the disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate ChromaCode’s research use only (RUO) nine-target high-definition PCR (HDPCR) tick-borne pathogen (TBP) panel using 379 retrospective, remnant whole-bloo...
Source: Journal of Clinical Microbiology - Category: Microbiology Authors: Tags: Parasitology Source Type: research
Abstract Ixodes scapularis is currently known to transmit 7 pathogens responsible for Lyme disease, anaplasmosis, babesiosis, tick-borne relapsing fever, ehrlichiosis, and Powassan encephalitis. Ixodes scapularis can also be colonized by endosymbiotic bacteria including those in the genus of Rickettsia. We screened 459 I. scapularis ticks submitted to the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station Tick Testing Laboratory with the objectives to (1) examine differences in infection prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, and Borrelia miyamotoi, (2) evaluate whether prevalence...
Source: The Journal of Parasitology - Category: Parasitology Authors: Tags: J Parasitol Source Type: research
This study also revealed the presence of the close ecological and evolutionary relationships between two important vector ticks, Hyalomma marginatum and Hy. aegyptium and determined genetic variations (distinct phylogenetic divergences inside the main clades) in some pathogenic SFG rickettsiae that are found in these ticks. Additionally, the presence of two Babesia species described very recently in hares with unknown vectors, namely Babesia sp. tavsan1 and Babesia sp. tavsan2, were detected for the first time in ticks. Finally, two unnamed Hepatozoon spp. were detected in Haemaphysalis ticks and their phylogenetic positio...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Of the ten ticks infected with B. burgdorferi s. l., B. afzelii was found in seven, undefinied genospecies in two, and mixed infection with B. afzelii and B. burgdorferi s. s. in one. The study demonstrated the potential risk of exposure of humans and animals to infections of B. burgdorferi s. l., A. phagocytophilum and B. microti in the examined area of Poland. PMID: 31885226 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine : AAEM - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Ann Agric Environ Med Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 6 December 2019Source: Ticks and Tick-borne DiseasesAuthor(s): Hein Sprong, Sander Moonen, Sipke E. van Wieren, Tim R. HofmeesterAbstractCattle grazing has been suggested to reduce the risk for Lyme borreliosis by decreasing the density of questing Ixodes ricinus infected with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato. We tested the hypotheses that cattle grazing used in woodland management decreases the density of questing I. ricinus, and that it decreases the nympal infection prevalence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato. We further expected the nympal infection prevalence of tick-borne pathogens that ...
Source: Ticks and Tick borne Diseases - Category: Zoology Source Type: research
Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, Ahead of Print.
Source: Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the potential danger from the inadvertent introduction of novel disease pathogens and vectors. Awareness of co-infections and Dermacentor reticulatus-related pathogens needs to be increased. PMID: 31694625 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Biomed Res - Category: Research Authors: Tags: BMC Vet Res Source Type: research
Updated Date: Tue, 15 Oct 2019 00:00:00 EDT
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