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Vermont Policy Makers Assess the Effectiveness of Acupuncture Treatment for Chronic Pain in Medicaid Enrollees

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine Jul 2017, Vol. 23, No. 7: 499-501.
Source: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Source Type: research

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The opioid epidemic and the growing elderly population underscore the need for effective alternative therapies to treat chronic painMedscape Medical News
Source: Medscape Psychiatry Headlines - Category: Psychiatry Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news
The American Academy of Pain Medicine reports that in 2011, more than 100,000 American adults suffered from chronic pain. Some chronic pain sufferers turn to prescription opioid medication for relief. Dr Brent Bauer, director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, says alternative therapies such as acupuncture, meditation or yoga can be effective [...]
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news
Discussion: The use of electrical stimulation and higher baseline pain score were associated with a positive treatment outcome, while the presence of a psychological comorbidity diminished the likelihood of treatment success. Practitioners should consider using electrical stimulation more frequently, and addressing psychopathology before or concurrent to treatment, when initiating acupuncture.
Source: The Clinical Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Laser acupuncture plus Chinese cupping at the Weizhong (BL40) and Ashi acupoints effectively reduced pain and inflammation in chronic nonspecific LBP. This therapy could be a suitable option for LBP treatment in clinical settings. PMID: 28848615 [PubMed]
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire More and more, I have families in my practice who are trying out treatments and therapies I didn’t prescribe. Most of the time, it’s absolutely fine. Other times, it’s not. “Complementary and alternative medicine” is a broad term that refers to treatments that are not generally part of traditional Western medicine. It includes things like herbal remedies, dietary supplements or alternative diets, acupuncture, acupressure, homeopathy, Chinese remedies, Reiki, or hypnosis. It also includes things like yoga or meditation — and chiropractic medicine. Many of th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Complementary and alternative medicine Parenting Source Type: blogs
Authors: Madsen C, Vaughan M, Koehlmoos TP Abstract Integrative medicine (IM) is a model of care which uses both conventional and nonconventional therapies in a "whole person" approach to achieve optimum mental, physical, emotional, spiritual, and environmental health, and is increasingly popular among patients and providers seeking to relieve chronic or multifactorial conditions. The US Department of Defense (DoD) shows particular interest in and usage of IM for managing chronic conditions including the signature "polytrauma triad" of chronic pain, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and posttraumati...
Source: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine - Category: Complementary Medicine Tags: Evid Based Complement Alternat Med Source Type: research
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a question that has challenged generations of patients and their doctors. The answer has changed over the years. When I was in medical school in the early 1980s, bedrest for a week or more was often recommended for severe back pain. This sometimes included hospital admission. Then, research demonstrated that prolonged bedrest was actually a bad idea. It was no better (and often worse) than taking it easy for a day or two followed by slowly increasing activity, including stretching and strengthening the back. Medications, including pain relievers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Complementary and alternative medicine Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
AbstractPurpose of ReviewThe purpose of the study was to catalog the most recent available literature regarding the use of conservative measures in treatment of pelvic floor disorders.Recent FindingsPelvic floor disorders encompass abnormalities of urination, defecation, sexual function, pelvic organ prolapse, and chronic pain, and can have significant quality of life implications for patients. Current guidelines recommend behavioral modifications and conservative treatments as first-line therapy for pelvic floor disorders. We have reviewed the literature for articles published on physical, complementary, and alternative t...
Source: Current Urology Reports - Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: research
Chiropractors and acupuncturists have lobbied for a greater role in treating pain. They might well have won it. Last week, the FDA released proposed changes Wednesday to its blueprint on educating health care providers about treating pain, which now recommend that doctors learn about chiropractic care and acupuncture as therapies that might help patients avoid opioids. There’s still time to stop this, but you have to write the FDA.
Source: Respectful Insolence - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Politics Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Chiropractic chronic pain fda opioid opioid addiction regulation Source Type: blogs
ConclusionsOverall, five reviews scored 6 or above using the AMSTAR scale and the inter-rater agreement was good (83.6%), whereas seven reviews achieved a low risk of bias rating using ROBIS and the inter-rater agreement was fair (60.0%). No firm conclusions were drawn for efficacy of either spinal manipulation or homoeopathy for FM. There is limited evidence for topicalCapsicum, but further research is required. There is some evidence to support the effectiveness of acupuncture for FM, but further high-quality trials are needed to investigate its benefits, harms and mechanisms of action, compared with no or standard treat...
Source: Systematic Reviews - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research
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