Medical News Today: Fetal alcohol syndrome: Causes, treatment, and symptoms

Fetal alcohol syndrome is one of a range of disorders, related to alcohol affecting fetal development. Learn about at the causes, symptoms, and treatments.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy / Obstetrics Source Type: news

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From the latestNIAAA Director's Blog:Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, also known as FASD, is a term that refers to the broad range of lifelong birth defects and neurodevelopmental abnormalities that occur as a result of prenatal alcohol exposure. In this edition of my blog, I want to remind everyone that there is no known safe level of alcohol, or time to drink, during pregnancy.  Read more...
Source: NIAAA News - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: news
ConclusionsThe findings highlight an attitude-behavior gap and suggest that positive preventive attitudes are insufficient to elicit FASD preventive behavior. Interventions are needed that go beyond education to build intrinsic motivation and structural support to refrain from alcohol use during pregnancy.
Source: Social Science and Medicine - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Alcohol is now recognized as the leading preventable cause of birth defects and developmental disorders in the United States. Each year thousands of children are born with life-long disabilities because they were exposed to alcohol prenatally. On September 9th, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism recognizes International Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Awareness Day as a reminder that there is no “safe” level of drinking while pregnant. 
Source: NIAAA News - Category: Addiction Authors: Source Type: news
CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that a partial or complete knockdown of Mns1 interacts with PAE to increases susceptibility to ocular defects and correlating craniofacial and brain anomalies, likely though interaction of alcohol with motile cilia function. These results further our understanding of genetic risk factors that may underlie susceptibility to teratogenic exposures. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 30129265 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: While understanding their milieu, our study also unraveled different struggles (such as violence, peer pressure, financial burden and depression) encountered by Native women in their daily lives. According to the participants, positive aspects of drinking outweigh the negative aspects and they viewed their drinking as a solution and not a problem. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29972869 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Mutation of the nNOS gene substantially increases vulnerability to alcohol-induced cell loss in a brain region where the gene is expressed (olfactory bulb), but not in a separate brain region, where the gene is not expressed (facial nucleus). Thus, differences in genotype may explain why some individuals are vulnerable to FASD, while others are not, and may determine the specific patterns of neuropathology in children with FASD. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29957842 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
“A crisis is a terrible thing to waste,” is a phrase coined by Stanford economist Paul Romer. Politicians are always in search of new crises to address—new fires to put out—with rapid and decisive action. In their passion to appear heroic to their constituents they often act in haste, not ta king the time to develop a deep and nuanced understanding of the issue at hand, insensitive to the notion that their actions might actually exacerbate the crisis.An example of that lack of understanding was made apparent in a  press release by the office of House Majority Whip Steve Scalise (R-LA) on J...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - Category: American Health Authors: Source Type: blogs
In this study, ethanol-dams voluntarily consumed a 0.066% saccharin-sweetened 10% ethanol (EtOH) solution for 10 days prior to pregnancy and throughout gestation while control-dams had ad libitumaccess to a 0.066% saccharin (sacc) solution. Whole litters were randomly assigned to undergo maternal separation (MS) for 3 hours/day from P2 to P14 while the remaining litters were left undisturbed (nMS). This resulted in 4 experimental groups: control (sacc + nMS), MS (sacc + MS), EtOH (EtOH + nMS) and EtOH + MS. Throughout development, EtOH-rats weighed less than control rats. However, subsequent maternal sepa...
Source: Behavioural Brain Research - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Behav Brain Res Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: These findings identify alcohol-related alterations in placental imprinted gene expression as potential biomarkers of adverse effect in FASD and suggest that these alterations may play a mechanistic role in fetal alcohol growth restriction. Future studies are needed to determine whether alterations in imprinted gene expression also mediate FASD neurobehavioral deficits and whether such alterations are amenable to intervention. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID: 29870072 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Clin Exp Res Source Type: research
Fetal alcohol syndrome occurs in children as a result of alcohol exposure during the mother’s pregnancy. It can cause irreversible brain damage, growth problems and behavior issues. No amount of alcohol is safe to consume during pregnancy but the risk of fetal alcohol syndrome increases with the amount of alcohol consumed during pregnancy. A New York Times Article discuses a new study that shows more children are being diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome than initially realized, affecting 1.1 to 5 percent of children in the US. This is 5 times higher than previously thought, making it just as common as a diagnosis ...
Source: Cord Blood News - Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Tags: babies brain development Cord Blood pregnancy Source Type: blogs
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