Severe sepsis and septic shock: clinical audit 2016/17

A report from the Royal College of Emergency Medicine finds that there has been an improvement in the proportion of patients receiving the best care for severe sepsis and septic shock, but that improvements are needed to make treatment available faster.
Source: NHS Networks - Category: UK Health Source Type: news

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AbstractClostridium difficile infection (CDI) produces a variety of clinical presentations ranging from mild diarrhea to severe infection with fulminant colitis, septic shock, and death. CDI puts a heavy burden on healthcare systems due to increased morbidity and mortality, and higher costs. We evaluated the clinical impact of CDI in terms of complications and mortality in a French university hospital compared with patients with diarrhea unrelated to CDI. A 3-year prospective, observational, cohort study was conducted in a French university hospital. Inpatients aged 18  years or older with CDI-suspected diarrhea were ...
Source: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases - Category: Microbiology Source Type: research
Objectives: Tie2 is a tyrosine kinase receptor expressed by endothelial cells that maintains vascular barrier function. We recently reported that diverse critical illnesses acutely decrease Tie2 expression and that experimental Tie2 reduction suffices to recapitulate cardinal features of the septic vasculature. Here we investigated molecular mechanisms driving Tie2 suppression in settings of critical illness. Design: Laboratory and animal research, postmortem kidney biopsies from acute kidney injury patients and serum from septic shock patients. Setting: Research laboratories and ICU of Hannover Medical School, Har...
Source: Critical Care Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Online Laboratory Investigations Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our study demonstrates multiple new microRNA-155–mediated mechanisms of sepsis-associated cardiovascular dysfunction, supporting the translational potential of microRNA-155 inhibition in human septic shock.
Source: Critical Care Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Online Laboratory Investigations Source Type: research
No abstract available
Source: Critical Care Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Online Letters to the Editor Source Type: research
Conclusions: We have developed and validated a high-performing, reproducible, and parsimonious algorithm to assist emergency department physicians in distinguishing sepsis/septic shock from noninfectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome.
Source: Critical Care Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Clinical Investigations Source Type: research
Conclusions: Early physical therapy during the first week of septic shock is safe and preserves muscle fiber cross-sectional area.
Source: Critical Care Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Clinical Investigations Source Type: research
Methylene blue (MB) has been advocated for the treatment of shock refractory to standard measures. MB is proposed to increase blood pressure in shock by interfering with guanylate cyclase and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Several studies have evaluated the vasoconstrictive and positive inotropic effects of MB in septic shock patients. However, there is a paucity of studies involving trauma patients.
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Clinical Communications: Pediatrics Source Type: research
Introduction: We hypothesized that aromatic microbial metabolites (AMM), such as phenyllactic (PhLA), p-hydroxyphenylacetic (p-HPhAA), and p-hydroxyphenyllactic (p-HPhLA) acids, contribute to the pathogenesis of septic shock. Methods: Clinical and laboratory data of patients with community-acquired pneumonia were obtained on intensive care unit admission and the next day. Patients were divided into two groups based on septic shock presence or absence. The levels of AMM (PhLA, p-HPhAA, p-HPhLA, and their sum, ∑3AMM), catecholamine metabolites (3,4-dihydroxymandelic [DHMA], 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic [DOPAC], and hom...
Source: Shock - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Clinical Science Aspects Source Type: research
Conclusion: Minimized daily hydrocortisone dosage of 100 mg could lower the occurrence of hyperglycemia without increasing mortality in septic shock, compared with the currently recommended dosage of 200 mg/day.
Source: Shock - Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Clinical Science Aspects Source Type: research
Endoscopy DOI: 10.1055/a-0655-1881 © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New YorkArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Full text
Source: Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: E-Videos Source Type: research
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