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Yoga, Tai Chi Used for Chronic Relief of Back Pain - AARP

4 hours ago ... Increasingly, more people are using alternative methods, such as massage, physical therapy and acupuncture in the treatment of chronic back  ...
Source: AARP.org News - Category: American Health Source Type: news

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A while back, I covered the updated evidence-based treatment guidelines for acute (less than four weeks) and subacute (less than twelve weeks) low back pain. I promised a post on chronic (more than twelve weeks) back pain. Well, as I write this, I am suffering from a recurrence of my own low back pain, which radiates down my right leg at times. This has been literally and figuratively a pain in my rear end, for years. Being a doctor who practices what I preach, I am putting all the advice I dispense to good use. First, look for possible triggers This fall, I had gotten away from my regular core-strengthening routine (night...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a question that has challenged generations of patients and their doctors. The answer has changed over the years. When I was in medical school in the early 1980s, bedrest for a week or more was often recommended for severe back pain. This sometimes included hospital admission. Then, research demonstrated that prolonged bedrest was actually a bad idea. It was no better (and often worse) than taking it easy for a day or two followed by slowly increasing activity, including stretching and strengthening the back. Medications, including pain relievers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Back Pain Complementary and alternative medicine Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Those of you who have experienced pain, especially gnawing, chronic pain, know that it affects your happiness, outlook and ability to function.In the past couple of years, the treatment of chronic pain has undergone an earthshaking transformation as opioid addiction continues to claim — and ruin — lives.Many primary care doctors no longer liberally prescribe opioid painkillers such as oxycodone, fentanyl and hydrocodone for back pain, migraines and other chronic conditions. Instead, they are increasingly turning to alternative medications and non-drug options such as acupuncture and physical therapy."Most ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling The 2016 summer Olympics had its share of exciting performances, upsets, and photo finishes. But for days after Michael Phelps’s first appearance at the games, it seemed all anyone could talk about was “cupping.” It’s an ancient therapy that left multiple circular discolorations on his skin. During “dry cupping,” suction is applied to the skin for several minutes; sometimes it is combined with massage, acupuncture, or other alternative therapies. (“Wet cupping” is similar except that blood is removed by making small cuts in the skin.) Cuppin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Source Type: blogs
Conclusions: Climbing may be an effective and low-cost therapy option for people with chronic low back pain. Clinical Relevance: Low back pain is a very common disease but still a challenge to treat. Therapy strategies vary from conservative ones, pharmacological treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and weak opioids, to invasive treatment with acupuncture, injections, and operative reconstruction. Some can be costly and not without risks. For instance, many people who use NSAIDs are at risk of common side effects such as gastrointestinal complications (irritation, ulcers, and bleeding) that may le...
Source: Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine - Category: Sports Medicine Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016 Source:EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing Author(s): Katrina Farber, L. Susan Wieland Background Low back pain (LPB) is one of the most common and costly musculoskeletal problems in modern society. It is experienced by 70% to 80% of adults at some time in their lives. Massage therapy has the potential to minimize pain and speed return to normal function. Objectives To assess the effects of massage therapy for people with non-specific LBP. Search methods We searched PubMed to August 2014, and the following databases to July 2014: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL...
Source: EXPLORE: The Journal of Science and Healing - Category: Complementary Medicine Source Type: research
It makes sense that the primary goal of pain treatment should be to reduce pain. However, a recent editorial in The New England Journal of Medicine makes a strong case for looking beyond pain intensity when evaluating what is “successful” pain management. The “balancing act” of managing chronic pain Here is the problem: For people with chronic pain, the pain affects nearly all aspects of their lives. But at the same time, treatments to relieve chronic pain also have the potential to influence many aspects of a person’s life. Our best pain-relieving drugs have lots of unpleasant side effects. E...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Addiction Arthritis Back Pain Cancer Migraines Pain Management Behavioral Health chronic pain managing pain Source Type: news
This paper aims to review the available evidence in support of the various nonoperative treatment options for cervical disc herniations. There is a lack of evidence to support most medications, modalities, and acupuncture. There is good evidence to support the use of anticonvulsants and antidepressants for the treatment of neuropathic pain that can be related to cervical disc herniations. Physical therapy and manual therapy have been shown to help improve acute and chronic neck. Cervical epidural steroid injections, using an interlaminar approach, have been shown to provide short and long term relief in pain related to cer...
Source: Seminars in Spine Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
This article aims to review the available evidence in support of the various nonoperative treatment options for cervical disc herniations. There is a lack of evidence to support most medications, modalities, and acupuncture. There is good evidence to support the use of anticonvulsants and antidepressants for the treatment of neuropathic pain that can be related to cervical disc herniations. Physical therapy and manual therapy have been shown to help improve acute and chronic neck pain. Cervical epidural steroid injections, using an interlaminar approach, have been shown to provide short and long-term relief in pain related...
Source: Seminars in Spine Surgery - Category: Orthopaedics Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: We have very little confidence that massage is an effective treatment for LBP. Acute, sub-acute and chronic LBP had improvements in pain outcomes with massage only in the short-term follow-up. Functional improvement was observed in participants with sub-acute and chronic LBP when compared with inactive controls, but only for the short-term follow-up. There were only minor adverse effects with massage. PMID: 26329399 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
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