Vaccination: three women in Nicaragua take a different journey towards a common goal
April 2018 Karla Bethania Ortiz, 26, from Comarca Bosque de Xilo á, Nicaragua, never understood why she was not vaccinated as a child. Unlike her friends, she did not have a vaccination card. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: immunization [subject], vaccination, vaccines [subject], vaccine, vaccine safety, vaccine quality, Feature [doctype], Nicaragua [country], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Unveiling vaccine hesitancy in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Immunization rates in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina are as low as 40% in some areas and continuing to decline, increasing the risk of large disease outbreaks. But, no one knows precisely why. Growing vaccine hesitancy, misinformation in social media, lack of trust in the health system, a shortage of health workers and supply issues are all suspected reasons for low coverage rates. However, these are mostly assumptions with little evidence. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: vaccines [subject], vaccine, vaccine safety, vaccine quality, Bosnia and Herzegovina [country], European Region [region], Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

From Trauma to Recovery: Addressing Emergency Care in Afghanistan
After fighting broke out in the rural district of Chark-Logar, Salim and his family were forced to flee their home. During the firefight, his brother was killed and Salim was shot in the stomach. It took Salim two hours until he reached a first aid post. In the process, he became separated from his wife and children. Two days later he was transferred to a hospital run by Emergency, an Italian NGO specialized in trauma care. Salim's story is not unusual in today's Afghanistan, which is in the midst of one of the longest protracted complex emergencies in the world. It faces prolonged conflict, frequent natural disasters and ...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, Afghanistan [country], Eastern Mediterranean Region [region], Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Belize steps up to prioritize the health challenges faced by its youth
Jared Cain, 18, from the south side of Belize City, Belize, knows all too well the sound of gunshots. "In the past two to three weeks alone, there ’s been multiple shootings in my neighborhood," says Cain, a member of the Belize Children’s Advisory Body and the Belize Family Life Association Youth Advocacy Movement. "It’s common to hear gunshots outside my window while I’m studying or playing video games with friends." (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: adolescent health [subject], adolescent, youth, young people, teen health, teenager, adolescence, adolescents, Belize [country], Feature [doctype], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

Healing the mental scars of violence in northeastern Nigeria
It began as a hot autumn day like any other for Aisha (pseudonym). The girl with big eyes was looking out of the window of her house, watching a group of men approach her brothers who were harvesting crops. Aisha thought they were family friends because they came up close to her siblings. Her mother Gaji was doing her household chores when she heard her 13-year-old daughter let out a piercing scream. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - April 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, mental health [subject], mental health promotion, violence [subject], violence prevention, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Nigeria [country] Source Type: news

Enabling quick action to save lives – the Contingency Fund for Emergencies
In October 2016, Haiti was hit by its strongest hurricane for more than half a century. Hurricane Matthew caused enormous damage, killing more than 470 people, leaving more than 175 000 homeless and decimating what little infrastructure the country had. Despite the devastation, within five days of receiving a request for help, WHO medical supplies – including cholera and malaria diagnosis and treatment kits – were being delivered to affected areas. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - March 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

On the trail of Lassa fever in southern Nigeria
Nafissa Ikerodah is both a detective and diplomat of sorts. On a Saturday morning in early March, the Disease Surveillance Officer in Edo State area rushes to a household where a man has just died of Lassa fever. The young father left behind two sons who show symptoms of the infectious disease. Nafissa wants to get the children to a hospital as quickly as possible. One boy is so weak he can barely stand. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - March 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: lassa fever [subject] Source Type: news

On the frontlines of the fight against Lassa fever in Nigeria
In early January, John had one of the most terrifying experiences of his life. The mechanic from a rural community in Edo state in southern Nigeria came down with Lassa fever. “I was scared the illness would kill me,” says John, who prefers to go by a pseudonym. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - March 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: lassa fever [subject] Source Type: news

Saving lives by sharing knowledge online
The early 21st century – with its increased travel and trade, rapid urbanization, environmental degradation and climate change – could have been fashioned to help epidemics thrive and grow. As public health emergencies have become more complex so have the responses – with local, national and international personnel involved, all bringing different backgrounds, cultures and levels of knowledge. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - March 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Denmark campaign rebuilds confidence in HPV vaccination
When Eigil Rosegar Poulsen first heard about the controversy over the human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination in Denmark, he became quite upset. Still, the debate sparked a desire to share his story. In 2010 Eigil lost his wife, Trine, to cervical cancer —a disease caused by the HPV virus—leaving him to raise their three daughters alone. Though the WHO-recommended vaccine against the most common types of the virus was only introduced in Denmark’s child vaccination schedule in 2009, far too late for his wife to benefit, Eigil is a strong advoc ate for vaccination. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - February 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: adolescent health [subject], adolescent, youth, young people, teen health, teenager, adolescence, adolescents, cancer [subject], cervical cancer, cervical cancer [subject], cervical tumour, cervical neoplasm Source Type: news

Незаменимая роль резервных партнеров в реагировании на чрезвычайные ситуации
Многие чрезвычайные ситуации в области здравоохранения возникают внезапно. Чтобы спасти людей, пресечь распространение болезни или ликвидировать последствия сти хийного бедствия, необходимо как можно быстрее доставить помощь туда, где в ней нуждаются. И прежде всего туда нужно доставить квалифицированный и опытный персонал . «Дополнит...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness Source Type: news

Standby partners ’ crucial role in emergency response
Health emergencies can come with little or no warning. Saving lives and preventing the spread of a disease or the fallout of a natural disaster means getting relief resources onsite quickly. Crucially, this includes skilled and experienced personnel. “Extra personnel must be in place quickly to support WHO’s emergency work, but emergencies can be a difficult time to identify the right staff and negotiate contracts”, said Dr Richard Brennan, Director of Emergency Management Operations at the World Health Organization (WHO). (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness Source Type: news

Working towards zero tolerance for female genital mutilation in Sudan
Nine years ago, one community in Sudan decided to follow WHO recommendations and abandon the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM). Since then, Tuti Island, a community of 21 000 residents located at the juncture where the White Nile and Blue Nile rivers merge, has been held up as a trailblazer in a growing movement to end FGM. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: female genital mutilation [subject], fgm, genital mutilation, Eastern Mediterranean Region [region], Feature [doctype], Sudan [country] Source Type: news

One year on, Global Observatory on Health R & D identifies striking gaps and inequalities
Each year, hundreds of billions of dollars are spent on research and development (R&D) into new or improved health products and processes, ranging from medicines to vaccines to diagnostics. But the way these funds are distributed and spent is often poorly aligned with global public health needs. One year ago, the World Health Organization launched a new initiative to gather information and provide an accurate picture of where and how R&D monies are being spent, helping governments, funders and researchers to make better decisions on investment and policy making priorities. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: health systems [subject] Source Type: news

Cervical cancer prevention and control saves lives in the Republic of Korea
2 February 2018 –The Republic of Korea is demonstrating how it is possible, through investment and expanded universal health coverage, to reduce illness and death through cervical cancer prevention and control, also a key focus of World Cancer Day on 4 February. Feature story (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - January 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: cancer [subject], cervical cancer, cancer [subject], cervical cancer, cervical cancer [subject], cervical tumour, cervical neoplasm Source Type: news

"Kangaroo Mother Care" programme in India helps premature triplets thrive
When Renuka Hadapad gave birth to triplets on 25 October 2016 in Koppal, India she saw little reason to celebrate. The babies were all girls. With two daughters already and a culture favouring male children, Renuka and her husband, Somappa, had hoped for a son. Moreover, despite a seamless birth in the district hospital, the triplets were born each weighing less than 1500 grams – making it difficult for them to nurse, stay warm or gain weight. Though Somappa and Renuka were heartbroken, the triplets needed their support to survive. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - January 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: maternal health [subject], maternal mortality, maternal, antenatal care, mother, childbirth, maternal welfare, newborn [subject], newborn, newborn health, perinatal, neonate mortality, newborn care, low birth weight, infant, newborn, Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Typhoid fever
What is typhoid fever? Typhoid fever is a life-threatening infection caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - January 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: typhoid [subject], typhoid, salmonella typhi, enteric fever, typhoid fever, Q & A [doctype] Source Type: news

Gaming disorder
What is gaming disorder? Gaming disorder is defined in the draft 11th Revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) as a pattern of gaming behavior ( “digital-gaming” or “video-gaming”) characterized by impaired control over gaming, increasing priority given to gaming over other activities to the extent that gaming takes precedence over other interests and daily activities, and continuation or escalation of gaming despite the occurrence o f negative consequences. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - January 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: mental health [subject], mental health promotion, Q & A [doctype] Source Type: news

2017 year in review: key health issues
Review the biggest health stories from WHO in 2017. Relive some of WHO's major achievements in the past year. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cannabidiol (compound of cannabis)
It has been widely reported that WHO officially recommended on December 14, 2017 that cannabis compound cannabidiol (CBD) not be internationally scheduled as a controlled substance. What is Cannabidiol and is it safe? (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: FAQ [doctype] Source Type: news

Addressing inequalities on the road to ‘health for all’ in Indonesia
WHO has published its first ever joint report with a Member State presenting a comprehensive assessment of health inequalities within a country. Age, sex, economic status, education and where a person lives, can all affect peoples ’ state of health and access to health services. The State of health inequality: Indonesia identifies priority areas for action to ensure that, when it comes to essential health, ‘no one is left behind’. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: health equity [subject], health inequity, health care disparities, Feature [doctype], Indonesia [country], South-East Asia Region [region] Source Type: news

A little black box for detecting and tracking outbreaks
One of the toughest tasks in responding to a major public health emergency is getting accurate information about infectious disease outbreaks. Infections can spread even more quickly than rumours, particularly when there is a lack of reliable, up-to-date information to detect, track and respond to outbreaks. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

10 facts about schistosomiasis
Schistosomiasis is an acute and chronic, parasitic disease caused by blood flukes (trematode worms) of the genus Schistosoma. At least 258 million people required treatment in 2014. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: neglected tropical disease [subject], schistosomiasis [subject], schistosoma haematobium, urinary schistosomiasis, intestinal schistosomiasis, bilharzia, schistosomiasis [subject], schistosoma haematobium, urinary schistosomiasis, intestinal schistosomias Source Type: news

A visit to Gornali is no holiday
In a world where record numbers of people need humanitarian assistance and disease outbreaks are a continual global threat, the systems needed to respond are under unprecedented strain. And the resources in shortest supply are field response staff – specialists who volunteer to take their skills to some of the world’s most threatening locations. "Before the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2015, we deployed about 100 people a year, but for the Ebola outbreak alone we sent more than 1,000. It became clear that we did not have enough adequately prepared people," explains Renee Christensen, Training Co-o...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Improving the lives of people with disability – the role of data
But through a WHO-backed initiative, she and her colleagues at Chile ’s National Disability Service have developed up-to-date information on disability in her Latin American nation, and are using this to strengthen services for people who need them. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: disabilities [subject], physically disabled, mentally disabled, disabled persons, people with disabilities, Chile [country], Press release [doctype], Region of the Americas [region] Source Type: news

WHO and Global Fund sign cooperation agreement
Today WHO and the Global Fund signed cooperation and financing agreements, amounting to an estimated US$50 million, to continue the invaluable technical support to countries to fight HIV AIDS, TB and malaria, and make significant strides towards the achievement of universal health coverage. "WHO and the Global Fund share a common mission and commitment to serve countries. These new agreements extend our close collaboration further," said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of WHO. "Partnerships will continue to be critical for achieving the mission of WHO. We cannot do it alone, and rely on partn...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - December 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: hiv/aids [subject], hiv, hiv infections, aids, malaria [subject], tuberculosis [subject], tb, Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Encounters with plague: tracing and preventing illness
In Madagascar, where a severe plague epidemic has unfolded since August 2017, the number of new infections is finally in decline. WHO is supporting health authorities to respond to the outbreak, from setting up specialized plague treatment units in health centres, to distributing medicines across the country. A particularly effective action has involved training teams to find people who have been in contact with a pneumonic plague patient – a system known as "contact tracing" – to help ensure these contacts are protected from falling sick themselves. Rakoto,* a 17-year-old man from Antananarivo, began...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Madagascar [country] Source Type: news

From soft drink taxes to detecting people at risk, the United Arab Emirates is promoting health by beating noncommunicable diseases
His dizzy spells came often, as did feelings of tiredness and passing of urine. For 10 years, Salem Hamad Al Mehairi knew something was wrong, but he couldn't put his finger on it. But the mystery was solved with just one visit to his local primary health centre in Dubai, which had been upgraded, in line with WHO recommendations, to routinely screen all patients for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), like cardiovascular and lung diseases, some cancers and type 2 diabetes. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: communicable disease [subject], infectious diseases, noncommunicable disease [subject], chronic diseases, Eastern Mediterranean Region [region], Feature [doctype], United Arab Emirates [country] Source Type: news

Diphtheria
 is an infection caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium Diphtheriae. Signs and symptoms usually start 2 – 5 days after exposure and range from mild to severe. Symptoms often come on gradually, beginning with a sore throat and fever. In severe cases, the bacteria produces a poison (toxin) that causes a thick grey or white patch at the back of throat. This can block the airway making it hard to b reathe or swallow and also create a barking cough. The neck may swell in part due to enlarged lymph nodes. The poison may also get into the blood stream causing &nb...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: diphtheria [subject], corynebacterium diphtheria, Q & A [doctype] Source Type: news

Making health services a safe place for women: Uganda steps up to support women subjected to violence
Violence against women is a global public health problem. In Uganda, more than half of all women have experienced violence at least once in their life, most likely from an intimate partner, leaving them feeling unsafe in the place they should feel the safest – their home. “Violence against women is everywhere in Uganda,” says Dr Olive Sentumbwe, National Professional Officer, WHO Uganda. “Women from all parts of society experience repeated abuse, which takes a toll on their physical and mental health.” (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: violence against women [subject], gender-based violence, rape, domestic violence, violence [subject], violence prevention, African Region [region], Uganda [country] Source Type: news

Antibiotic resistance – tackling a danger of a different kind in the Syrian Arab Republic
Hanaya Raad is a Syrian pharmacist who has dedicated herself to spreading awareness on antibiotic resistance in her home country. A topic not covered in her out-dated university curriculum, Ms Raad first heard about antibiotic resistance after she graduated when it was mentioned in a practical course for pharmacists. On hearing about this mounting threat, Ms Raad and two of her fellow graduates Sarah Safadi and Nour Allahham took it upon themselves to take action. After digging further into the topic and educating themselves on the best course of action for pharmacists, Ms Raad and her colleagues approached the Syrian Phar...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: antimicrobial resistance [subject], Eastern Mediterranean Region [region], Feature [doctype], Syrian Arab Republic [country] Source Type: news

Treating diabetes takes more than insulin: Senegal mobile phone project promoting public health
(Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: diabetes [subject], diabetes mellitus, hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, diabetes [subject], diabetes mellitus, hyperglycaemia, glucose intolerance, ehealth [subject], medical informatics, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Senegal [country] Source Type: news

Climate change and its impact on health on small island developing states
(Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: climate change [subject], climate change [subject], global warming, global environmental change, climate, Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Creative campaigns spread awareness on antibiotic resistance
(Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: antimicrobial resistance [subject], European Region [region], Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Facing the threat of antibiotic-resistance: Israel ’s success to prevent and control the spread of carbapenem-resistant bacteria
Facing the threat of antibiotic-resistance: Israel ’s success to prevent and control the spread of carbapenem-resistant bacteria (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: antimicrobial resistance [subject], European Region [region], Feature [doctype], Israel [country] Source Type: news

Namibia ’s ban on antibiotics in healthy animals drives meat exports
Namibia ’s ban on antibiotics in healthy animals drives meat exports (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: antimicrobial resistance [subject], African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Namibia [country] Source Type: news

Madagascar plague: mitigating the risk of regional spread
(Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Madagascar [country] Source Type: news

Personal Stories from TB Survivors - My Journey fighting TB
(Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: tuberculosis [subject], tb, tuberculosis [subject], tb, Feature [doctype] Source Type: news

Unsung heroes on World Polio Day
World Polio Day, 24 October, is an opportunity to recognize the work of committed WHO staff members like Mohammedi, along with the more than 20 000 other unsung heroes working to eradicate polio around the world. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, African Region [region], Photo gallery [doctype] Source Type: news

Plague
What is plague? Plague is an infectious disease found in some small mammals and their fleas. People can contract plague if they are in bitten by infected fleas, and develop the bubonic form of plague. Sometimes bubonic plague progresses to pneumonic plague, when the bacteria reaches the lungs. Person-to-person transmission is possible through the inhalation of infected respiratory droplets of a person who has pneumonic plague. Common antibiotics are efficient to cure plague, if they are delivered very early, because the course of the disease is usually rapid. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: plague [subject], bubonic plague, pneumonic plague, Q & A [doctype] Source Type: news

Timpiyan, Kenya - Zoonotic TB survivor
My name is Timpiyan and I am a zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) survivor. I come from the Kajiado County in Kenya, and I am originally from a Maasai tribe. Since 2016 I have been a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) Civil Society Task Force on TB. In 2011, I realized that something was wrong with my health when I started losing weight while my stomach was constantly swollen. I had a whole body scan at the hospital in Nairobi and the doctors told me that they saw a big mass in my upper abdomen which had to be removed. It turned out it was pus, and when I woke up after a 7-hour surgery, the doctors told me that I had TB...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - October 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: tuberculosis [subject], tb, tuberculosis [subject], tb, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Kenya [country] Source Type: news

Thailand ’s physical activity drive is improving health by addressing NCDs
In 2011, when she was 64, Umpun, from Thailand ’s northern Angthong Municipality, was diagnosed with high levels of cholesterol and the dietary fat triglyceride. This raised the threat of suffering from a cardiovascular disease, Thailand’s – and the world’s – leading cause of death, including of people aged under 70. “My doctor advised me to start physical activity and change my diet, and after I started exercising I later found that my triglycerides and cholesterol level had decreased,” says Umpun, now 70 and a village health volunteer. “I enjoyed very much this physical act...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - October 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: cardiovascular disease [subject], cardiovascular disease, heart attack, heart attacks, cvd, heart diseases, heart disease, high blood pressure, hypertension, diet [subject], healthy diet, physical activity [subject], exercise, movement, Feature [doctype], Source Type: news

Philippines embraces efforts to step up cardiovascular disease care
(Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: cardiovascular disease [subject], cardiovascular disease, heart attack, heart attacks, cvd, heart diseases, heart disease, high blood pressure, hypertension, communicable disease [subject], infectious diseases, noncommunicable disease [subject], chronic d Source Type: news

Education programmes save lives from rabies in India
(Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: rabies [subject], Feature [doctype], India [country], South-East Asia Region [region] Source Type: news

Timpiyan, Kenya - Zoonotic TB survivor
My name is Timpiyan and I am a zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) survivor. I come from the Kajiado County in Kenya, and I am originally from a Maasai tribe. Since 2016 I have been a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) Civil Society Task Force on TB. In 2011, I realized that something was wrong with my health when I started losing weight while my stomach was constantly swollen. I had a whole body scan at the hospital in Nairobi and the doctors told me that they saw a big mass in my upper abdomen which had to be removed. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: tuberculosis [subject], tb, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Kenya [country] Source Type: news

Theodor, Namibia - TB survivor
My name is Theodor, I am 26 years old and I leave in Greenwell Matongo, Namibia. Three months ago, a close friend noticed that I had been coughing for over a week and advised me to go to the hospital to get my sputum checked. When the results arrived, doctors told me that I had tuberculosis (TB). (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: tuberculosis [subject], tb, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Namibia [country] Source Type: news

Sophia, Namibia - TB survivor
My name is Sophia and I am a tuberculosis (TB) survivor. I am 34 years old, a Namibian and a few years ago I moved to Windhoek to find a job. Soon after I realized that I wasn ’t feeling well. My chest was hurting, I was coughing a lot and I had no appetite, so I went to the hospital where I had a sputum test. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: tuberculosis [subject], tb, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Namibia [country] Source Type: news

Timpiyan, Zambia - Zoonotic TB survivor
My name is Timpiyan and I am a zoonotic tuberculosis (TB) survivor. I come from the Kajiado County in Kenya, and I am originally from a Maasai tribe. Since 2016 I have been a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) Civil Society Task Force on TB. In 2011, I realized that something was wrong with my health when I started losing weight while my stomach was constantly swollen. I had a whole body scan at the hospital in Nairobi and the doctors told me that they saw a big mass in my upper abdomen which had to be removed. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: tuberculosis [subject], tb, African Region [region], Feature [doctype], Kenya [country] Source Type: news

"Hold Your Breath", paintings made by Russian artist while in a TB clinic
“Hold your Breath” presents the story of Russian artist Paulina Siniatkina’s fight against tuberculosis (TB). In 2015, Paulina spent 6 months and 17 days in a TB clinic in Moscow. She went through fear, misunderstanding, anger, despair, loneliness, silence, love, friendship and hope, and left the hospital with a series of artworks that tell the stories of people who shared her fate. She created these works of art to fight the stigma attached to TB. The exhibition "Hold your breath" has been travelling the world since then, fighting stigma and urging people not to be afraid to talk about TB. On...
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: communicable disease [subject], infectious diseases, tuberculosis [subject], tb, tuberculosis [subject], tb, European Region [region], Feature [doctype], Russian Federation [country] Source Type: news

One year after Nigeria emergency declaration.
North-eastern Nigeria is in its 8th year of crisis; resulting in two out of every three health facilities completely or partially destroyed. Although the situation and access to populations has changed over time, the goal for WHO and its partners remains the same: to reduce the risk of disease outbreaks and bring life-saving health services to those who need them. (Source: WHO Feature Stories)
Source: WHO Feature Stories - September 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: emergencies [subject], emergency preparedness, crises, emergency preparedness, African Region [region], Nigeria [country], Photo gallery [doctype] Source Type: news