New study reveals how smoking during puberty can cause negative consequences in offspring
(The University of Bergen) Smoking in early puberty in boys may have negative consequences for their future generations of offspring, a study from the University of Bergen (UiB) shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social media influencing grows more precarious in digital age
(Cornell University) Influencing millions of people on social media and being paid handsomely is not as easy as it looks, according to new Cornell University research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Early exposure to cannabis compounds reduces later neural activity in zebrafish: study
(University of Alberta) Zebrafish exposed to the leading cannabinoids found in cannabis in the earliest stages of development suffer a significant drop in neural activity later in life, according to a University of Alberta study that has implications for prenatal development in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds specialty behavioral health establishments increased, but more needs to be done
(Indiana University) The number of specialty behavioral health establishments, their workforce and their wages have increased steadily between 2011 and 2019, according to a new study by Indiana University and University of Michigan researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

R & D exploration or exploitation? How firms respond to import competition
(Strategic Management Society) Do firms respond to tougher competition by searching for new technological solutions (exploration) or do they work to defend their position by improving current technologies (exploitation)? The Strategic Management Journal (SMJ) examines this issue and finds that in the years that immediately follow an increase in import penetration, firms tend to rely more on familiar knowledge in the development of innovations. This R&D strategy appears to be temporary and improves a firm's likelihood of survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's shadow figment technology foils cyberattacks
(DOE/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Scientists have created a cybersecurity technology called Shadow Figment that is designed to lure hackers into an artificial world, then stop them from doing damage by feeding them illusory tidbits of success. The aim is to sequester bad actors by captivating them with an attractive--but imaginary--world. The technology is aimed at protecting physical targets--infrastructure such as buildings, the electric grid, water and sewage systems, and pipelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence agreement to advance Army modernization efforts
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army plans to cooperate in artificial intelligence research with teams led by the University of Maryland, College Park and in partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The cooperative agreement brings together a collaborative of nearly 30 diverse experts in engineering, robotics, computer science, operations research, modeling and simulation, and cybersecurity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMaine researchers: Culture drives human evolution more than genetics
(University of Maine) University of Maine researchers found that culture helps humans adapt to their environment and overcome challenges better and faster than genetics. Tim Waring and Zach Wood found that humans are experiencing a " special evolutionary transition " in which the importance of culture is surpassing the value of genes as the primary driver of human evolution. Due to the group-orientated nature of culture, they also concluded that human evolution itself is becoming more group-oriented. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WVU designated as one of only eight ECHO Superhub sites in the US
(West Virginia University) A program at the West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute at WVU has now been designated as one of only eight in the US and one of only 18 worldwide. WVCTSI Project ECHO can now offer outreach support, mentoring and training to healthcare providers and institutions on how to start their own ECHO program, designed to reduce health disparities in underserved and remote areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tens of thousands of women turn to the ER for fibroid symptoms
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Fibroid symptoms, such as heavy menstrual bleeding and abdominal pain, are increasingly driving women to the emergency room. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Canadian prescription opioids users experience gaps in access to care
(PLOS) Stigma and high care needs can present barriers to the provision of high-quality primary care for people with opioid use disorder (OUD) and those prescribed opioids for chronic pain. A study by Tara Gomes at the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada and colleagues suggests that people treated for an opioid use disorder were less likely to find a new primary care provider (PCP) within one year of termination of enrolment with the previous physician. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New evidence may change timeline for when people first arrived in North America
(Iowa State University) An unexpected discovery by an Iowa State University researcher suggests that the first humans may have arrived in North America more than 30,000 years ago - nearly 20,000 years earlier than originally thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forged books of seventeenth-century music discovered in Venetian library
(Penn State) In 1916 and 1917, a musician and book dealer named Giovanni Concina sold three ornately decorated seventeenth-century songbooks to a library in Venice, Italy. Now, more than 100 years later, a musicologist at Penn State has discovered that the manuscripts are fakes, meticulously crafted to appear old but actually fabricated just prior to their sale to the library. The manuscripts are rare among music forgeries in that the songs are authentic, but the books are counterfeit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why moms take risks to protect their infants
(RIKEN) It might seem like a given than mothers take extra risks to protect their children, but have you ever wondered why? A new study led by Kumi Kuroda at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan shows that in mice, this and other nurturing behaviors are driven in part by neurons in a small part of the forebrain that contain a protein called the calcitonin receptor. The study was published in Cell Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unprecedented data sharing driving new rare disease diagnoses in Europe
(Center for Genomic Regulation) Massive data sharing across Europe is boosting efforts to diagnose rare diseases for individuals whose case remains unsolved even after going through advanced expert clinical settings. A new method developed by an international consrortium has resulted in 255 new diagnoses, which is the 'tip of the icerberg'. The findings are an important first step for a European-wide system to facilitate the diagnosis rare diseases, which can be a long and arduous process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Most buprenorphine prescriptions are written by a small number of providers
(RAND Corporation) Policymakers have looked for ways to get more health care provides to provide outpatient medication management to people battling opioid use disorder. A new study finds that most prescriptions for the drug buprenorphine, used to treat opioid use disorder, are written by a small number of the health care providers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Rush researchers develop new measure of brain health
(Rush University Medical Center) A new measure of brain health developed by researchers at Rush University Medical Center may offer a novel approach to identifying individuals at risk of memory and thinking problems, according to research results published in Alzheimer's& Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association on June 1, 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protecting the intellectual abilities of people at risk for psychosis
(Universit é de Gen è ve) Psychotic disorders comes with a progressive decline in IQ. If current drug treatments are successful in containing psychotic symptoms, nothing can be done to prevent the deterioration of intellectual skills that leads to loss of autonomy. Researchers (UNIGE) have discovered that prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in late childhood can reduce the deterioration of intellectual abilities and have a neuroprotective effect on some of the brain regions affected by the psychotic illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sick bats also employ 'social distancing' which prevents the outbreak of epidemics
(Tel-Aviv University) it appears that bats also maintain social distancing which might help prevent the spread of contagious diseases in their colonies (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Men make more extreme choices and decisions, find scientists
(University of Sydney) Men are more likely to make extreme choices and decisions than women, according to new research on economic decision-making, led by an international team of scientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The narrative of becoming a leader is rooted in culture
(University of Vaasa) What are the growth stories of Finnish leaders like? In a recent study from the University of Vaasa, Finnish directors were asked about their paths to leadership and these growth stories were compared with the leadership stories in V ä in ö Linna's novels The Unknown Soldier and Under the North Star. According to the study, the directors' stories repeat elements that are rooted in our cultural heritage and can also be seen in Linna's novels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trust among corvids
(University of Konstanz) Corvids use social information to protect themselves against deception by conspecifics from neighboring territories. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Foster care, homelessness are higher education hurdles
(University of Georgia) A college education is estimated to add $1 million to a person's lifetime earning potential, but for some students the path to earning one is riddled with obstacles. That journey is even more difficult for students who have been in the foster care system or experienced homelessness, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mumpreneur success still requires conventional masculine behaviour
(University of Kent) A new study led by Kent Business School, University of Kent, finds that whilst the mumpreneur identity may enable women to participate in the business world and be recognised as 'proper' entrepreneurs, this success is dependent on alignment with the conventional masculine norms of entrepreneurship. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

At-the-moment stress for parents during COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions
(Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation) New research finds that during COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, parental stress was higher during the workday compared to after the workday and lower during weekends than during weekdays. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain activity reveals when white lies are selfish
(Society for Neuroscience) You may think a little white lie about a bad haircut is strictly for your friend's benefit, but your brain activity says otherwise. Distinct activity patterns in the prefrontal cortex reveal when a white lie has selfish motives, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Overconfidence in news judgement
(University of Utah) Individuals who falsely believe they are able to identify false news are more likely to fall victim to it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Newly discovered African 'climate seesaw' drove human evolution
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) A scientific consortium led by Dr Stefanie Kaboth-Bahr of the University of Potsdam has found that ancient El Ni ñ o-like weather patterns were the primary drivers of environmental change in sub-Saharan Africa over the last 620 thousand years - the critical timeframe for the evolution of our species. The group found that these ancient weather patterns had more profound impacts in sub-Saharan Africa than glacial-interglacial cycles more commonly linked to human evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender stereotypes still hold true for youth and types of political participation
(The Polish Association of Social Psychology) Gender roles absorbed early on have shaped today's youth regarding their involvement in politics, in line with traditional stereotypes, concludes a new study, conducted amongst adolescents and young adults aged between 15 and 30 in Italy. The researchers report that young males are more likely to engage directly with politics and take part in protests, while their female counterparts would rather choose civic activities, such as volunteering, charity and petitions, in order to serve the community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The price is right: Modeling economic growth in a zero-emission society
(Tokyo University of Science) With increasing public awareness of crises associated with degraded environments and mounting pressure to act, governments worldwide have begun to examine environmentally sustainable policies. However, there are many questions about whether enacting these policies will negatively affect economic growth. Now, a model created by researchers in Japan suggests that sustained GDP growth is possible even after spending to clean up pollution as it is created, providing hope that a zero-emission society is an achievable goal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Socioeconomic disparities in respiratory health in US
(JAMA Network)What The Study Did:Socioeconomic disparities in respiratory health over the past six decades in the United States are described in this study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Examining well-being, life expectancy with having family member incarcerated
(JAMA Network) What The Study Did: This survey study examined the associations of having an incarcerated immediate or extended family member with perceived well-being and change in projected life expectancy among adults in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Applying private insurer rules to Medicare Part B
(JAMA Network)What The Study Did:Researchers estimated the extent Medicare Part B medical services would have been subject to prior authorization under private insurance coverage policies and calculated the associated spending. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA engineering professor honored by AAS for leadership, technical contributions
(University of Texas at Arlington) Kamesh Subbarao, a professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, is the University's first faculty member to earn the honor of fellow of the American Astronautical Society (AAS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solving a double murder arouses international interest
(Link ö ping University) The technology using DNA-based genealogy that solved a double murder in Link ö ping opens completely new possibilities in investigating serious crime. LiU researchers are now involved in spreading new knowledge about the technology, which brings hope to police forces and has aroused major international interest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pioneering single-dose radiotherapy for breast cancer treatment
(University College London) A breast cancer therapy that requires just one shot of radiotherapy is as effective as traditional radiotherapy, and avoids potential damage to nearby organs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Japan's hands-off formula in disciplining schoolchildren works. Is it worth a try elsewhere?
(Hiroshima University) A look at Japan's mimamoru approach suggests that adults' non-intervention in kids' fights allows children to nurture social and interpersonal skills on their own. Is it worth a try in other countries? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Behavioural study to understand mass cooperation awarded € 2.5 million
(University of Nottingham) A new study to understand when and why people are prepared to cooperate and act in the interest of others, rather than themselves, has been awarded € 2.5 million by the European Research Council (ERC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UM research suggests social factors important for human-wildlife coexistence
(The University of Montana) University of Montana researchers recently published a new study in the Journal of Wildlife Management analyzing why landowners do or don't secure attractants in bear country. The results suggest that collective or socially motivated factors may be a missing and important piece of the puzzle for encouraging voluntary steps to secure attractants and improve wildlife-human coexistence. The researchers also offer suggestions for how wildlife managers might help increase these behaviors through improved messaging and outreach. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA investigates crowd logistics program to move crops, livestock from farm to market
(University of Texas at Arlington) An expert in logistics at The University of Texas at Arlington is designing a better way for farmers to move crops and livestock to market through crowdsourced transportation programs, akin to an agricultural Uber.The National Science Foundation (NSF) Early Career Development program awarded Caroline Krejci, assistant professor in the Industrial, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering Department, a five-year, $532,585 grant to further her research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ban on flavored vaping may have led teens to cigarettes, study finds
(Yale University) When San Francisco voters overwhelmingly approved a ballot measure banning the sale of flavored tobacco products in 2018, public health advocates celebrated. After all, tobacco use poses a significant threat to public health and health equity, and flavors are particularly attractive to youth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Video platforms normalize exotic pets
(University of Adelaide) Researchers at the University of Adelaide are concerned video sharing platforms such as YouTube could be contributing to the normalisation of exotic pets and encouraging the exotic pet trade. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 kept our parks busy, but not everyone ventured outside
(University of Queensland) Public use of parks and reserves increased only slightly during last year's COVID-19 national lockdown despite gyms and sports facilities shutting down, a University of Queensland study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Changes in how cholesterol breaks down in the body may accelerate progression of dementia
(PLOS) The blood-brain barrier is impermeable to cholesterol, yet high blood cholesterol is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. However, the underlying mechanisms mediating this relationship are poorly understood. A study published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Vijay Varma and colleagues at the National Institute on Aging, suggests that disturbances in the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids may play a role in the development of dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep warning for older men
(Flinders University) Men aged 65 and over should monitor their sleep patterns and seek medical advice after a warning from Flinders University experts that disrupted slumber can be linked to cognitive dysfunction. In a new article published in the Journal of Sleep Research, the Australian research group studied a group of 477 middle-aged and older men's attention and processing speed in relation to their sleep. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NTU Singapore scientists turn aquaculture waste into new biomaterial for tissue repair
(Nanyang Technological University) Scientists at NTU Singapore have developed a new biomaterial made entirely from discarded bullfrog skin and fish scales that could help in bone repair. The scientists believe the biomaterial is a promising alternative to the current standard practice of using a patient's own tissues, which requires additional surgery for bone extraction. At the same time, the production of this biomaterial tackles the problem of aquaculture waste. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trust is key for the parents of children with rare diseases to live without anxiety
(Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)) The parents of children with rare diseases face exceptional circumstances which influence their role as parents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Socioeconomically disadvantaged adolescents' diets worsened during lockdown
(Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC)) This is the main finding of a study by the University of Vic - Central University of Catalonia and Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, which warns of increased inequalities amongst this group, already vulnerable before lockdown (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AJR: Ultrasound, MRI aid placenta accreta diagnosis
(American Roentgen Ray Society) In diagnosing severe placental accreta spectrum disorder, placental bulge sign achieved on ultrasound an accuracy of 85.5%, sensitivity of 91.7%, and specificity of 76.9%, and on MRI an accuracy of 90.3%, sensitivity of 94.4%, and specificity of 84.6%. Ultimately, placental bulge was an independent predictor of severe placental accreta spectrum disorder on ultrasound (odds ratio=8.94) and MRI (odds ratio=45.67). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fisheries resilience following Tohoku tsunami
(Tohoku University) A small Japanese fishing community devastated by the Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011 managed to recover from the disaster through cooperative community activity despite the propensity for individualist-competitive behavior within fisheries - cooperative activity that continued many years later. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 27, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news