What we think we know -- but might not -- pushes us to learn more
(University of California - Berkeley) Our doubts about what we think we know pique our curiosity and motivate us to learn more, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Marching for climate change may sway people's beliefs and actions
(Penn State) Americans have a long tradition of taking to the streets to protest or to advocate for things they believe in. New research suggests that when it comes to climate change, these marches may indeed have a positive effect on the public. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Initially threatened by change, people adapt to societal diversity over time
(Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs) With time, people can adapt to societal diversity and actually benefit from it, according to a study led by researchers at Princeton University and the University of Oxford. Those in power especially set the tone for integrating people into a new society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Creativity: A question of impulsiveness
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) How can employees' working time be organized so as to enable them to perform in the best possible way when completing both creative and routine tasks? Two economists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg investigated this question and made a surprising discovery. Which working model works best depends on employees' impulsiveness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Soft, social robot brings coziness to homes -- and classrooms
(Cornell University) A new social robot that can be customized with handcrafted material, such as wood and wool, brings simplicity and fun to home robotics -- and will soon be used to help teach math to fourth graders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Belief in the 'prosperity gospel' does not turn people into successful entrepreneurs
(Baylor University) Belief in the 'Prosperity Gospel' -- that God financially blesses faithful followers -- does not turn individuals into successful entrepreneurs. But prosperity beliefs can fuel values linked to entrepreneurial thinking, such as power and achievement, according to a Baylor University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New report: Nearly 19,000 asylum seekers await US entry in Mexican border cities
(University of California - San Diego) The number of asylum seekers on wait lists in Mexican border cities or those waiting to get on these lists has grown to 18,700, according to a new report. It reveals the number of asylum-seekers has grown by more than 14,000 in just over the last three months. In addition, wait times are longer than ever before, averaging about one month, and asylum seekers are arriving to an increasing number of cities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Exercise may help teens sleep longer, more efficiently
(Penn State) Getting more exercise than normal -- or being more sedentary than usual -- for one day is enough to affect sleep later that night. Researchers found that when teenagers got more physical activity than they usually did, they got to sleep earlier, slept longer and slept better that night. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Long-lived roundworms help identify new anti-aging compounds among the FDA approved drugs
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reversed by a number of FDA-approved drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Long-lived roundworms helped identify new anti-aging compounds among FDA approved drugs
(Gero) Researchers from Gero, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech), Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) collaborated to derive a transcriptomic signature of aging, which they confirmed using large transcriptomic databases. They discovered that aging in nematodes is partially programmed and can be therapeutically reversed by a number of FDA-approved drugs. The study is published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Stanford research examines how augmented reality affects people's behavior
(Stanford University) Stanford scholar Jeremy Bailenson and other researchers found that people's interactions with a virtual person in augmented reality, or AR, influenced how they behaved and acted in the physical world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA political scientist analyzes the UN's Twitter feed to improve diplomatic relations
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Through research by a political scientist at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), there is potential to see diplomacy between nations improve through the use of Twitter. UTSA researcher, Matthias Hofferberth, is exploring how the United Nations (UN), uses Twitter as a diplomacy tool, an approach that has been discussed as Twiplomacy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study shows crowdsourced traffic data could save lives
(University of California - Irvine) A new University of California, Irvine-led pilot study finds, on average, Waze 'crash alerts' occur two minutes and 41 seconds prior to their corresponding California Highway Patrol (CHP)-reported crash. These minutes could mean the difference between life and death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social networks and suicide prevention
(Flinders University) Depression and mental health problems are increasing - and suicide and drug overdose rates are rising dramatically in the USA. In many US communities, traditional social networks -- face-to-face contacts of daily life -- are unraveling with the loss of social supports, Flinders University psychiatrists warn in a letter published in the international journal The Lancet. This is associated with increasing 'deaths of despair' related to alcohol, opiate overdose and suicide 'becoming more prevalent than ever.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New therapeutic target for depression identified
(University of Malaga) There are different pharmacological treatments for depression, mainly therapies that act on the serotonin system -- the so-called SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). However, it has been evidenced that these antidepressants take around two weeks to have an effect and, what's more, around 30% of patients are resistant to this drug.Researchers of the Department of Human Physiology of the UMA Faculty of Medicine have taken a step closer to a new therapeutic target to face this mental disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctoral dissertation: The Secret Gospel of Mark is not a fake
(University of Helsinki) Dissertation research in New Testament exegetics proves that the letter by Clement of Alexandria to Theodore, a suspected forgery, is in fact genuine. The letter contains controversial passages from The Secret Gospel of Mark (also known as The Longer Gospel of Mark). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Strategies for racetrack betting
(World Scientific) 'Exotic Betting at the Racetrack,' by William T. Ziemba, is a thorough account of racetrack betting. It covers the efficient-inefficient strategy to price and find profitable racetrack bets, along with handicapping that provides actual bets made by the author on essentially all of the major wagers offered at US racetracks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Help for youth who have experienced sexual or physical abuse
(Goethe University Frankfurt) There have not been many scientifically evaluated therapies for teens and young adults who have suffered physical or sexual abuse until now. Psychologists at Goethe University have closed the gap by developing a psychotherapeutic approach designed specifically for this age group. Its effectiveness has now been proved in a nationwide study lasting four years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lack of evaluation in countering violent extremism may boost terror threat
(University of Birmingham) A lack of evaluation of the impact of countering violent extremism (CVE) and counter-terrorism (CT) efforts may actually be increasing the threat and risk of terrorism, a new study points out. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NUS pilot study opens new possibilities for AI to enhance cognitive performance
(National University of Singapore) Results of a pilot study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore provided evidence that an artificial intelligence known as CURATE.AI has the potential to enhance learning, and could pave the way for promising applications in personalized digital therapy, including the prevention of cognitive decline. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chimpanzees at the crossroads: adapt to living outside protected areas
(University of Kent) Chimpanzees at the crossroads: how they adapt to living outside protected areasResearch carried out into the impact of changes to chimpanzee habitats found they have adapted to human developments in a number of ways -- including learning how to cross roads safely and the best times to visit human habitats -- but their survival is still threatened. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient proteins offer clues to the past
(American Chemical Society) Archeologists once relied solely on artifacts, such as skeletal remains, fossils and pottery sherds, to learn about past species and cultures. Today's scientists can also study ancient proteins to paint a more complete picture of the people who lived at archeological sites, and the plants and animals they raised and ate, according to an article inChemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Residential child care project addresses emotional pain without causing it
(Cornell University) A model of care for children's residential agencies takes children's emotional pain into account and emphasizes the bond between the children and their caregivers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study questions European Parliament's perception as champion of gender equality
(Wiley) The European Parliament is often viewed as the most democratic and gender equal decision-making institution of the European Union. A new Journal of Common Market Studies article critically scrutinizes this assumption through an analysis of female members' perceptions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cocktails with Cleopatra?
(The Hebrew University of Jerusalem) A team of scientists from Hebrew University, Israel's Antiquities Authority, Tel Aviv University and Bar-Ilan University create ancient alcohol from ancient yeast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Predictors of refugee adjustment: The importance of cognitive skills and personality
(Saarland University) An increased willingness to take risks, reciprocating friendliness, and a conviction that they are in control of their own lives lead to refugees gaining a foothold in Germany faster. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children of both young and old parents share risk for certain neurodevelopment disorders
(Elsevier) Results of a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that parental age is linked to the risk for the development of neuropsychiatric disorders in children, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD); attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD); obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD); and Tourette's disorder/chronic tic disorder (TD/CT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The cultural significance of carbon-storing peatlands to rural communities
(University of Cambridge) A group of UK and Peruvian researchers have carried out the first detailed study of how rural communities interact with peatlands in the Peruvian Amazon, a landscape that is one of the world's largest stores of carbon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global climate change emergency leads to first World Forum on Climate Justice
(Elsevier) Elsevier and the Glasgow Caledonian University Centre for Climate Justice are pleased to announce a partnership that will provide the platform to discuss the impacts of climate change on weather forecasting, people trafficking and growing spread of mosquito-borne malaria, among other topics, at the first World Forum on Climate Justice, June 19-21, 2019 at Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Implicit measures' better assess vocabulary for those with autism than standard tests
(University of Vermont) In a new study, researchers demonstrate that assessment tools capturing implicit signs of word knowledge among those with severe autism like eye movement can be more accurate than traditional assessments of vocabulary, pointing the way toward better inventions and spurring much needed new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
(University of Virginia Health System) Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. Based on their findings, the researchers are urging HIV clinics to expand their mental health services on site. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discrimination against older people needs attention, study says
(University of Alberta) Ever cracked a joke about old people? It might seem funny, but in a world where the population aged 60 or over is growing faster than all younger age groups, ageism is no laughing matter, says a University of Alberta researcher. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Testifying while black: A linguistic analysis of disparities in court transcription
(Linguistic Society of America) A new study has found that court reporters transcribe speakers of African American English significantly below their required level of accuracy. The study 'Testifying while black: An experimental study of court reporter accuracy in transcription of African American English,' by Taylor Jones (University of Pennsylvania), Jessica Kalbfeld (New York University), Ryan Hancock (Philadelphia Lawyers for Social Equity), and Ryan Clark (University of Pennsylvania) will be published in the forthcoming June 2019 issue of the scholarly journal Language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA research addresses evolving learning needs
(University of Texas at Arlington) George Siemens, UTA professor of psychology, has received a grant from The Boeing Company to construct an integrated data infrastructure that will centralize digital learning and engagement tools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want to eliminate workplace bias? Watch your rating system, study says
(University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management) A new study looking at student ratings of university teaching performance shows that a substantial gender gap under a 10-point system disappears when the system used only has six points. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PSU wins $1 million contract to empower Vietnam's provincial capacity and performance
(Portland State University) PSU's Mark O. Hatfield School of Government will serve as the lead academic partner for a newly awarded USAID Strengthening Provincial Capacity (SPC) contract to support economic and political governance reform in Vietnam. Chemonics International Inc., an international development organization in Washington, D.C., will serve as prime contractor for the five-year, $13.3 million award, in a partnership that also includes J.E. Austin Associates Inc. of Arlington, Va. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flamingoes, elephants and sharks: How do blind adults learn about animal appearance?
(Johns Hopkins University) They've never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Food insecurity in Nunavut increased after Nutrition North Canada introduced
(Joule Inc.) Food insecurity, meaning inadequate or insecure access to food because of a lack of money, has worsened in Nunavut communities since the introduction of the federal government's Nutrition North Canada program in 2011, found research published in CMAJ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New podcast explores why 'statistically significant' is so misunderstood
(Taylor& Francis Group) It's a controversial topic. Probability values (p-values) have been used as a way to measure the significance of research studies since the 1920s, with thousands of researchers relying on them since. With this reliance, though, comes misunderstanding and, therefore, misuse.This misunderstanding is what the latest episode of the How Researchers Changed the World podcast explores, in conversation with statistician Ron Wasserstein. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CBD reduces craving and anxiety in people with heroin use disorder
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) Mount Sinai study highlights the potential of cannabidiol as a treatment option for opioid abuse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penguins and their chicks' responses to local fish numbers informs marine conservation
(British Ecological Society) Endangered penguins respond rapidly to changes in local fish numbers, and monitoring them could inform fisheries management and marine conservation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bad marketing encourages consumers to opt for lower quality products
(ESMT Berlin) A new framework to enable retailers to better position their products to consumers has been devised by Tamer Boyaci and Frank Huettner at ESMT Berlin together with Yalcin Akcay from Melbourne Business School. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chinese-Americans abused earlier in life face greater abuse risk as elders
(Rutgers University) Chinese-Americans who were victims of child abuse or intimate partner violence are at a greater risk of abuse when they are elderly, according to a Rutgers study in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The healing power of a smile: A link between oral care and substance abuse recovery
(University of Utah Health) A new study links the benefits of comprehensive oral care to the physical and emotional recovery of patients seeking treatment for substance use disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Farmers have less leisure time than hunter-gatherers, study suggests
(University of Cambridge) Hunter-gatherers in the Philippines who adopt farming work around ten hours a week longer than their forager neighbours, a new study suggests, complicating the idea that agriculture represents progress. The research also shows that a shift to agriculture impacts most on the lives of women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Statin use associated with reduced risk of dementia after concussion in older adults
(JAMA Network) Concussion is a common brain injury. This observational study of nearly 29,000 adults (66 and older) diagnosed with concussion examined whether statin use was associated with risk of long-term dementia after a concussion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence system spots lung cancer before radiologists
(Northwestern University) Artificial intelligence was able to detect malignant lung nodules on low-dose chest computed tomography scans with a performance meeting or exceeding that of expert radiologists, reports a new study from Google and Northwestern Medicine.This deep-learning system provides an automated image evaluation system to enhance the accuracy of early lung cancer diagnosis that could lead to earlier treatment. Lung cancer is most common cause of cancer deaths in US and is harder to treat when diagnosed at advanced stages. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using AI to remix radio for people living with dementia
(University of Plymouth) A £ 2.7m project is to use artificial intelligence to adapt and personalise live radio, with the aim of transforming life for people living alone with dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anxious people quicker to flee danger
(California Institute of Technology) By better understanding anxiety circuits in our brain, researchers may one day learn what goes awry in people with anxiety disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers receive $1.94 million to study connection between autism, microbiome
(Oregon State University) An Oregon State University researcher is part of a $1.94 million grant to look for possible connections between the human microbiome and autism spectrum disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news