More exercise, fewer screens: New Australian guidelines for kids in OSHC
(University of South Australia) Groundbreaking research from the University of South Australia has delivered world-first national-level guidelines to better inform children's physical activity and screen time in Outside School Hours Care (OSHC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Racial diversity within a church is associated with higher average attendance over time
(Baylor University) United Methodist churches -- whether the congregation is white or not -- have higher attendance when located within white neighborhoods. But racial diversity within a church is associated with higher average attendance over time, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 29, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient genomes trace the origin and decline of the Scythians
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) Generally thought of as fierce horse-warriors, the Scythians were a multitude of Iron Age cultures who ruled the Eurasian steppe, playing a major role in Eurasian history. A new study published in Science Advances analyzes genome-wide data for 111 ancient individuals spanning the Central Asian Steppe from the first millennia BCE and CE. The results reveal new insights into the genetic events associated with the origins, development and decline of the steppe's legendary Scythians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social, not just biological factors, key in increased knee injuries among girls and women
(University of Bath) A new British Journal of Sports Medicine paper argues that the reason women are more prone to sports injuries has more to do with gendered environments than female biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hypnosis changes the way our brain processes information
(University of Turku) In a new study, Finnish researchers showcased that the way our brain processes information is fundamentally altered during hypnosis. The research helps to understand how hypnosis produces changes in a hypnotised person's behaviour and subjective experiences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI and satellite images come together to discover hidden archaeological sites
(Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia - IIT) The project has born from the collaboration between Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia and the ESA in order to detect archaeological sites from above by analyzing satellite images through artificial intelligence (AI). IIT's researchers of the Centre of Cultural Heritage Technology in Venice, led by Arianna Traviglia, will introduce AI to help archaeologists trace back the ancient presence of humans by revealing hidden traces in the soil. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

British Academy awards interdisciplinary 'Back Chat' project a prestigious grant
(University of Huddersfield) The project - 'Back Chat' - will work inclusively with children living in different and disadvantaged localities in the north of England, prioritising hearing directly from children about the impacts of pandemic policies on their lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Studying the health and wellbeing of police officers during the global pandemic
(University of Huddersfield) The University's Professor Jason Roach will work alongside the National Police Wellbeing Service on a research project that will study to what extent the health and wellbeing of the nation's police officers has been affected by the pandemic (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Signals from muscle protect from dementia
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Scientists at St. Jude are studying how signals sent from skeletal muscle affect the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

School closures disproportionately hit disadvantaged students in the US
(Bocconi University) A study analyzing the distribution of school closures due to COVID concludes that racial minorities, students in need and with already poor academic performance have been more likely engaged in remote schooling since September 2020 (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Climate change significantly increases population displacement risk
(ETH Zurich) The risk of people being forced from their homes by flooding increases by half for each additional degree of global warming, as an international research team led by the Weather and Climate Risks Group at ETH Zurich demonstrate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sanfilippo co-edits book on the relationships between privacy, governance, and information
(University of Illinois School of Information Sciences) A new book published by Cambridge University Press explores the complex and dynamic relationships between privacy, governance, and the production, cultivation, and sharing of knowledge. It features several case studies across academia, social media, mental health, and the Internet of Things (IoT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Duke-NUS clinician scientist and his team bag two prestigious awards
(Duke-NUS Medical School) Professor David Matchar and his team from the Health Services and Systems Research (HSSR) Programme at Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, bagged two prestigious awards at the International Stroke Conference 2021, held virtually on 17-19 March, 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Relieve your stress, relieve your allergies
(Osaka City University) Through a series of experiments using nasal polyp organ culture and mouse models of restraint stress, researchers unveil relationship between presence of corticotropin-releasing stress hormone and increase in and degranulation of allergy-causing mast cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient megafaunal mutualisms and extinctions as factors in plant domestication
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) The development of agriculture is often thought of as a human innovation in response to climate change or population pressure. A new manuscript published in Frontiers in Plant Science challenges that concept, suggesting that plants that had already evolved adaptive traits for life among large-bodied grazing and browsing animals were more likely to prosper on a highly disturbed anthropogenic landscape. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nearly half of poison control calls for supersized alcopops involve underage drinkers
(George Mason University) Supersized alcopops are ready-to-drink flavored alcoholic beverages that have up to five times the alcohol content of beer and appear to be marketed toward young drinkers. A new George Mason University study led by Dr. Matthew Rossheim found that calls to U.S. poison control centers for supersized alcopops disproportionately involved underage drinkers compared to calls for other alcohol products. Better regulation of their alcohol content and retail availability is urgently needed to protect youth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Warriors' down bedding could ease journey to realm of the dead
(Norwegian University of Science and Technology) Feathers, an owl head and oars suggest the people in this Iron Age grave were prepared for a long journey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seven new projects to start on EBRAINS research infrastructure, joining the HBP community
(Human Brain Project) Seven innovative projects will soon start on the EBRAINS research infrastructure, becoming members of the HBP community. The selected projects range from Neuroscience to Medicine, AI and Robotics, with successful applicants coming from science and industry in Italy, Spain, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When fly larvae are hungry
(University of Konstanz) Biologist Dr Katrin Vogt from the University of Konstanz is studying how hunger and other internal states control behaviour (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals how long-term infection and inflammation impairs immune response as we age
(Texas Children's Hospital) A study published led by Dr. Katherine King, associate professor at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, shows for the first time that long-term infection and chronic inflammation drive CH mediated by the loss of Dnmt3a function. In addition, the study offers key insights into the mechanism by which chronic inflammation leads to CH and demonstrates the critical role of DNMT3a in regulating normal HSC responses to infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does selfishness evolve? Ask a cannibal
(Rice University) Biologists have used one of nature's most prolific cannibals to show how social structure affects the evolution of selfish behavior. Researchers showed they could drive the evolution of less selfish behavior in Indian meal moths with habitat changes that forced larval caterpillars to interact more often with siblings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global evidence for how EdTech can support pupils with disabilities is 'thinly spread'
(University of Cambridge) An 'astonishing' deficit of data about how the global boom in educational technology could help pupils with disabilities in low and middle-income countries has been highlighted in a new report. The review also found that many teachers lack training on how to use new technology, or are reluctant to do so. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researcher receives navy grant to study creative decision making
(University of Arkansas) University of Arkansas psychology researcher receives Navy @USNavyResearch grant to study creative decision making, work that could guide how military personnel are trained on how to make battlefield decisions quickly and effectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tired of video conferencing? Research suggests you're right to question its effectiveness
(Carnegie Mellon University) The prevalent assumption is that technology that helps to mimic face-to-face interactions via a video camera will be most effective in achieving the same results, yet there's little data to actually back up this presumption. Now, a new study challenges this assumption and suggests that non-visual communication methods that better synchronize and boost audio cues are in fact more effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Narcissism driven by insecurity, not grandiose sense of self
(New York University) Narcissism is driven by insecurity, and not an inflated sense of self, finds a new study, which may also explain what motivates the self-focused nature of social media activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 'great leveler' revisited: Why the Corona pandemic might boost inequality in society
(Utrecht University) How will COVID-19 affect inequality in countries worldwide? The current pandemic is sometimes marked as 'great equalizer', but scientists from Utrecht and Wageningen University show why the opposite might be true. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA team working with communities to combat environmental racism, urban sprawl
(University of Texas at Arlington) A team from the College of Architecture, Planning and Public Affairs (CAPPA) is one of two nationwide to win a $40,000 SOM Foundation Research Prize to create a design playbook for Black settlements in North Texas. A second $20,000 grant from the Dallas Regional Chamber aims to elevate southern Dallas County to a more economically fertile, better-informed and healthier place to live. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Failed your New Year resolution again? Join the club
(Edith Cowan University) New Edith Cowan University (ECU) research which surveyed participants from the UK and Australia has found that despite having the best intentions, most people give up on their New Year resolutions within the first month. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lawyers used sheepskin as anti-fraud device for hundreds of years to stop fraudsters pulling the woo
(University of Exeter) Medieval and early modern lawyers chose to write on sheepskin parchment because it helped prevent fraud, new analysis suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Programs help shield Black youth from effects of racism
(University of Georgia) Family-centered prevention programs that foster protective caregiving can buffer the negative effects of racial discrimination on young Black people, according to a study published by University of Georgia researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Overhearing negative claims about social groups may influence development of bias in children
(Society for Research in Child Development) Throughout the world, societies discriminate against and mistreat members of certain social groups. Young children may express intergroup biases that lead to such outcomes, demonstrating preferences for their own over other groups. A new longitudinal study mimicked a situation in which children might overhear derogatory messages about a new social group. The study revealed that overhearing a stranger's negative claims about a social group, even in a brief comment, can have a lasting influence on children's attitudes towards the group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

1 ยบ of global warming causes a ~50% increase in population displacement risk
(IOP Publishing) Every year, millions of people around the world are displaced from their homes due to climate-related disasters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Towards a better understanding of societal responses to climate change
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) In an article published in Nature, an international team of researchers presents a newly developed framework to address the challenges common to studies of the history of climate and society. By applying their framework, the team uncovers five pathways that helped pre-modern populations adapt to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Early training delays symptom onset in mouse model of Rett syndrome
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers found that in a mouse model of Rett syndrome, intensive training beginning before symptoms appear dramatically improved the performance of specific motor and memory tasks and substantially delayed the appearance of symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alzheimer's patients' cognition improves with Sargramostim (GM-CSF), new study shows
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) A new study suggests that Sargramostim, a medication often used to boost white blood cells after cancer treatments, is also effective in treating and improving memory in people with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease. The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus presents evidence that Sargramostim has both disease-modifying and cognition-enhancing activities in Alzheimer's disease patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

News media keeps pressing the mute button on women's sports
(University of Southern California) Women's sports continue to be almost entirely excluded from television news and sports highlights shows, according to a USC/Purdue University study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Risk of suicide attempt after diagnosis of dementia
(JAMA Network) Researchers evaluated the association between a recent diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment or dementia and the risk of attempting suicide among older adults. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Remdesivir and clinical improvement in hospitalized patients with COVID-19
(JAMA Network) This comparative effectiveness research study that included a high proportion of non-White individuals assesses whether remdesivir administered alone or with corticosteroids is associated with time to clinical improvement or time to death in patients hospitalized with confirmed COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microaggressions against surgeons, anesthesiologists
(JAMA Network) This survey study investigated the frequency and nature of sexist and racial/ethnic microaggressions against female and racial/ethnic-minority surgeons and anesthesiologists and the association with physician burnout. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thirteen UNIST researchers awarded prestigious 2021 Sejong Science Fellowship!
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has announced that 13 UNIST researchers, including Dr. Jae Beom Lee have been awarded prestigious 2021 Sejong Science Fellowship. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gender bias in the workplace starts with communication during recruitment
(Bocconi University) A new study finds that a leadership role is described in a more positive way to a male than to a female candidate, all the more so if the person who outlines the role is a conservative (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds foster youth lack critical financial skills
(Washington State University) Researchers surveyed 97 foster care youths aged 14 to 20. They found that those who were age 18 and over had more advanced financial capability than younger kids, but still had not achieved key skills such as opening a checking account, building up savings or establishing a credit history. The paper recommends enhancements to the foster care system to fully prepare youth for independence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mixed reality gets a machine learning upgrade
(Osaka University) Osaka University researchers showed that mixed reality views of proposed buildings or landscapes can be generated rapidly with the help of machine learning. By using a mobile game engine, the future perspective can be rendered in real time. This work may lead to a renewed emphasis on sustainable architecture. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psychological forest: What trees reveal about Antarctic researchers
(Research Organization of Information and Systems) Relying on multiple tests, including a tree drawing task, researchers have completed a comprehensive psychological assessment of multiple Japanese Antarctic research teams, determining that most people cope with the harsh, isolated conditions through one of two methods: maintaining a strong internal connection to home or remaining adaptive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

During the first wave of coronavirus pandemic older adults left home mainly for physical activity
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) In spring 2020, when the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic hit Finland, older adults drastically reduced their out-of-home activities. During the period of government restrictions, physical exercise was the most common reason to leave home. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children exposed to tobacco smoke use more emergent health services
(University of Cincinnati) Tobacco smoke-exposed children utilize emergency and urgent care services more often than unexposed children, which contributes to a large toll on the nation's health care system, says research led by the University of Cincinnati. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shame of contracting Covid-19 can prevent individuals declaring infection to authorities
(University of Kent) New research from the University of Kent and Leeds Beckett University has found that feelings of shame and stigmatisation at the idea of contracting Covid-19 are linked to lower compliance of social distancing and the likelihood of reporting infection to authorities and potential contacts in Italy, South Korea and the USA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Building a picture of fathers in the family justice system in England
(Lancaster University) The invisibility of dads who lose access to their children because of concerns about child neglect or their ability to provide safe care comes under the spotlight in new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The world's earliest stone technologies are likely to be older than previously thought
(University of Kent) A new study from the University of Kent's School of Anthropology and Conservation has found that Oldowan and Acheulean stone tool technologies are likely to be tens of thousands of years older than current evidence suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USC researchers show path to zero-emissions L.A.
(University of Southern California) USC researchers partner with the U.S. Energy Department and city of Los Angeles to help chart a course to a zero-emissions future for the city -- one of the biggest studies of its kind by the federal government. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news