USC researchers discover abundant source for neuronal cells
(University of Southern California) USC researchers seeking a way to study genetic activity associated with psychiatric disorders have discovered an abundant source of human cells -- the nose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals how Chinese travellers use technology abroad
(University of East Anglia) Traditional cultural values and government policy influence how Chinese backpackers use technology while travelling, according to new research by the University of East Anglia (UEA).The study looked at how independent Chinese tourists use the internet during their trips abroad and found strong social influences on their digital behaviour. These result from their embedded culture, social circles, and the trust placed in word-of-mouth review platforms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Lancet Neurology: Cannabis-based drug in combination with other anti-spasticity
(The Lancet) Oral spray containing two compounds derived from the cannabis plant reduced spasticity compared with placebo in patients already taking anti-spasticity drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers uncover molecular mechanisms linked to autism and schizophrenia
(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) Two UCLA-led studies published in Science have linked DNA changes to their molecular effects in the brain, uncovering new mechanisms for psychiatric diseases. The findings provide a roadmap for developing a new generation of therapies for conditions like autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Book publications still going strong in humanities and social sciences
(Kazan Federal University) As it appeared, not many countries maintain statistics of such ratios in their scholarly publications. Norway, in particular, is a pioneer in creating a comprehensive database of such type. 336,681 peer-reviewed publications were covered in total. For the five statistical sets, the number of monographs varied from 2 percent in Flanders to 10.6 percent for Poland, while book chapters went from 20.5 percent for Flanders up to 55.8 percent for Poland. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify widespread brain alterations in children with callousness
(Elsevier) Children with elevated levels of callous traits--such as a lack of remorse and disregard for other people's feelings--show widespread differences in brain structure compared with children with lower levels of the traits, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study investigates treatments for prurigo nodularis
(George Washington University) A team from the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found emerging treatments, such as neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists, were the most promising against prurigo nodularis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parents' brain activity 'echoes' their infant's brain activity when they play together
(PLOS) Research shows for the first time that when adults are engaged in joint play together with their infant, the parents' brains show bursts of high-frequency activity, which are linked to their baby's attention patterns and not their own. The study publishes December 13 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology and was conducted by Dr Sam Wass of the University of East London in collaboration with Dr Victoria Leong (Cambridge University and Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Video game players frequently exposed to graphic content may see world differently
(University of New South Wales) Disturbing imagery disrupts perception, but not as much among violent video game players, UNSW Sydney psychologists have shown. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The long dry: why the world's water supply is shrinking
(University of New South Wales) A global study has found a paradox: our water supplies are shrinking at the same time as climate change is generating more intense rain. And the culprit is the drying of soils, say researchers, pointing to a world where drought-like conditions will become the new normal, especially in regions that are already dry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccine could help address the opioid epidemic
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Synthetic psychoactive drugs have become a serious public health threat in recent years. This is particularly true of the fentanyls, a large family of synthetic opioids, which can be up to 10,000 times more potent than morphine. Synthetic opioids are highly addictive and, because of their potency, often prove fatal: among the roughly 72,000 drug overdose deaths in the US in 2017, some 30,000 were related to synthetic opioids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research suggests how parents protect children from the long-term effects of stress
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) When young children experience violence or poverty, the effect can last well into adulthood. But new research from the Emory School of Medicine suggests that a strong parental relationship could override some of these effects, by changing how children perceive the environmental cues that help them distinguish between what's safe or dangerous. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deportation: Noncitizens fare better in counties that are 20-40 percent Hispanic
(University of California - Santa Cruz) An exhaustive new analysis of deportation practices across the country reveals a 'protective effect' for noncitizens living in communities that are 20 percent to 40 percent Hispanic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Calories in popular restaurant chain meals 'excessive' warn experts
(University of Liverpool) The calorie content of popular main meals served in UK and international restaurant chains is excessive and only a minority meet public health recommendations, finds a University of Liverpool study published in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
(University of Washington) In 2016, Seattle Public Schools pushed back start times for its 18 high schools by 55 minutes. In a paper published Dec. 12 in Science Advances, researchers at the University of Washington and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies announced that, as a result, teens at two Seattle high schools got more sleep on school nights -- a median increase of 34 minutes of sleep each night -- and showed improved attendance and grades. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Delayed high school start times in seattle increase sleep, grades and attendance
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) In Seattle, Washington, delaying the start time of two high schools by nearly an hour lengthened students' daily sleep by more than half an hour, and was associated with reduced sleepiness and increased academic performance. Notably, in the students at the school that was more economically disadvantaged, the delayed start time was also associated with an increase in punctuality and attendance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are suicidal thoughts, attempts more likely in people with eczema?
This study evaluated the association between eczema and suicidal thoughts and attempts by analyzing the combined results of 15 studies including 310,000 patients with eczema and 4.4 million people without eczema. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antipsychotic treatment and risk of unexpected death in children, young people
(JAMA Network) Antipsychotic medications can have adverse effects, including those that are life-threatening. This observational study examined the association of antipsychotic medications prescribed for children and young adults without psychosis and risk of unexpected death, which includes deaths due to unintentional drug overdose or cardiovascular/metabolic causes. About 250,000 children and young people (ages 5 to 24) enrolled in Medicaid in Tennessee were included. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers developing nonopioid drug for chronic pain
(Virginia Tech) Researchers from the Virginia Tech School of Neuroscience are teaming with the University of California San Diego and the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop a drug -- now in its earliest stages -- that can treat certain types of chronic pain without the addictive consequences of opioids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attention, please! Anticipation of touch takes focus, executive skills
(University of Washington) A study by the University of Washington and Temple University examines what happens in children's brains when they anticipate a touch to the hand, and relates this brain activity to the executive functions the child demonstrates on other mental tasks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The reading behavior of students in the digital age
(University of Erlangen-Nuremberg) Knowing how to study properly takes practice, and this is especially true when students are working on academic texts. However, the way we read in this digital age and thus how we understand texts and generate knowledge has changed. Researchers at Carl von Ossietzky Universit ä t Oldenburg and Friedrich-Alexander-Universit ä t Erlangen-N ü rnberg (FAU) are now researching how to innovatively design university-level teaching in this digital age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How bullying affects the brain
(Springer) The effects of constantly being bullied are more than just psychological. Research now shows that there may be physical structural differences in the brains of adolescents who are regularly victimized, and this could increase the chance that they suffer from mental illness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insight into cause of rare disorder may aid quest for treatments
(University of Edinburgh) New findings about the causes of a rare genetic disorder that affects mainly boys, known as MeCP2 duplication syndrome, may inform the development of treatments for the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research questions the 'Glass Cliff' and corroborates the persistent 'Glass Ceiling'
(Elsevier) Are women more likely to be appointed to leadership positions in crisis situations when companies are struggling with declining profits? (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3D printing offers helping hand to patients with arthritis
(Michigan Technological University) 3D printing can cut the cost of adaptive aids that help people with hand arthritis. Current products are quite expensive, and more so to create customized versions, but 3D printing drops the cost by an average of 94 percent for 20 different handheld devices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High-dose antipsychotics place children at increased risk of unexpected death
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Children and young adults without psychosis who are prescribed high-dose antipsychotic medications are at increased risk of unexpected death, despite the availability of other medications to treat their conditions, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published today in JAMA Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new algorithm improves flight safety and reduces delays
(Universidad Carlos III de Madrid) The Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) has taken part in a European research project named TBO-Met which has developed an algorithm that maximizes the predictability of flights and reduces the risk of running into (potentially dangerous) storms. Thanks to this, safety can be improved, the abilities of air traffic can be increased and delays can be reduced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fishery length, angler effort: How they relate
(Dauphin Island Sea Lab) A new study suggests reducing the number of fishing days in a season doesn't reduce catch as much as some would predict. The publication, Compression and relaxation of fishing effort in response to changes in length of fishing season for red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in the northern Gulf of Mexico, was released by NOAA in the November 2018 National Fishery Bulletin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study finds employee incentives can lead to unethical behavior in the workplace
(Virginia Tech) Findings suggest that setting compensation goals can increase dishonesty when managers are also paid a bonus for hitting certain targets. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
(University of Washington) A new University of Washington-led study examines one key stress-inducing circumstance -- the effects of social hierarchy -- and how cells respond to the hormones that are released in response to that stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trying to get people to agree? Skip the French restaurant and go out for Chinese food
(University of Chicago Booth School of Business) When people in a business negotiation share not just a meal but a plate, they collaborate better and reach deals faster, according to new research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New evidence that females might benefit most from a low-salt diet
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) A low-salt diet may be more beneficial in lowering blood pressure in females than males, report scientists who found that while actual salt retention isn't higher in females, there is still an effect that drives pressure up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What more could we do to prevent veteran suicides? Survey reveals clues
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Every day, 20 veterans die by suicide -- and most choose a firearm to do it. A new survey of veterans who receive VA mental health care could guide suicide prevention efforts. Ninety-three percent said they would approve of the VA offering options to address firearm access - such as having health providers ask about veterans' access to firearms, providing gun locks, or teaching veterans' family and friends about suicide warning signs and firearm safety. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Music evokes powerful positive emotions through personal memories
(University of Jyv ä skyl ä - Jyv ä skyl ä n yliopisto) Music is known to evoke emotions through a range of mechanisms. A new study gives insights into the way positive emotional reactions can be triggered by music and pictures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New tool delivers swifter picture of cognitive deficit
(University of Adelaide) A new tool, developed by researchers from the University of Adelaide, will assist clinicians to assess people suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New academic-service partnership to help support New York City Medicaid recipients
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) The CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy Center for Innovation in Mental Health (CIMH), a collaboration with the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH), has partnered with Coordinated Behavioral Care (CBC), a New York City not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the quality of care for Medicaid beneficiaries with serious mental illness, chronic health conditions, and/or substance use disorders, to evaluate programs across the CBC Network, conduct quality improvement initiatives, and establish innovative best practices. (Sou...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Citations show academic and non-academic researchers 'win' when they collaborate
(University of Maryland) Findings in new PNAS paper indicate that when academics work with business, government, and/or NGO partners they produce more cited, higher impact research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attention training improves intelligence and functioning of children's brain
(University of Granada) the study shows that the beneficial effects of training in the brain and intelligence are greater when an educator implement a coaching strategy design in order to help the child to understand their training process (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Meditation adapts the brain to respond better to feedback
(University of Surrey) In a new study in the Journal of Cognitive, Affective& Behavioral Neuroscience researchers from the University of Surrey have discovered a link between meditation and how individuals respond to feedback. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The contribution of international academics to UK must be recognised, says business school
(University of Bath) Immigrant academics play a critical role in the UK's international and national collaborations that bring social and economic benefits beyond academia, shows a new study of the public engagement activities of the UK's native-born and international academics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Great success for the promotion of young researchers at the University of Bern
(University of Bern) The Swiss National Science Foundation (SNSF) has pledged to finance nine new assistant professorships at the University of Bern within the framework of the first 'Eccellenza' call for proposals. At the same time, an 'Eccellenza' grant was also approved, resulting in a total of approximately 16.2 million in funding flowing to Bern. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research to examine why more men are not employed in early years education
(Lancaster University) Currently only around 2 percent of the UK's Early Years Education (EYE) workforce are male -- a figure that has remained stubbornly resistant to change for several decades. Now new research, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, at Lancaster University aims to improve understanding of the obstacles that stand in the way of more men taking up employment in the EYE workforce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Online game trains players how to sort waste correctly
(University of British Columbia) A simple online game can teach people to more accurately sort waste--with lasting results, a new UBC study has found. Study participants who played the game developed by UBC researchers received immediate feedback on their sorting choices. The second time they played--when feedback was no longer provided--players still improved their average accuracy from 69 per cent to 84 per cent. Even when a week passed between games, players still improved their accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientific assessment of endangered languages produces mixed results
(Linguistic Society of America) A new study of the progress made over the last 25 years in documenting and revitalizing endangered languages shows both significant advances and critical shortfalls. The article, " Language documentation twenty-five years on " , will be published in the December, 2018 issue of the scholarly journal Language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brainwaves suppress obvious ideas to help us think more creatively
(Queen Mary University of London) The human brain needs to suppress obvious ideas in order to reach the most creative ones, according to scientists at Queen Mary University of London and Goldsmiths, University of London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fewer than half of the countries provide tuition-free pre-primary education
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Researchers from the Higher School of Economics and UCLA Fielding School of Public Health ’ s WORLD Policy Analysis Center have found that 45 percent of countries, with only 15 percent of low-income countries, provide tuition-free pre-primary education. The results of the study will be published in the December 2018 issue of International Organisations Research Journal. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Houses in hurricane strike zones are built back bigger
(University of Southampton) A study of hurricane-hit areas of the United States has revealed a trend of larger homes being built to replace smaller ones in the years following a storm. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Estimates of ASD, ADHD risk in siblings born after older children with those disorders
(JAMA Network) Siblings born in a family after other children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) were more likely to be diagnosed with the same disorder or the other disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Obesity, risk of cognitive dysfunction? Consider high-intensity interval exercise
(Florida Atlantic University) Researchers have discovered what might be an effective strategy to prevent and combat cognitive dysfunction in obese individuals. They are the first to examine the modulatory role of an exercise-induced protein in the brain that promotes neuron survival and used high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in obese and normal-weight subjects. Obesity reduces the expression of this protein and lower levels are associated with Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and obesity. HIIE upregulated this protein in the obese subjects compared to normal-weight subjects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Memory tests predict brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease
(University of Helsinki) Use of two episodic memory tests help in predicting brain atrophy and Alzheimer's disease, as indicated by a study carried out at the University of Helsinki and the University of California. Researchers suggest that comprehensive use of memory tests could improve the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news