Parents' mental health problems increase risk of reactive attachment disorder in children
(University of Turku) Children's risk of being diagnosed with reactive attachment disorder (RAD) increases if parents are diagnosed with any type of mental health disorder, discovered researchers from the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry of the University of Turku, Finland. Particularly parents' alcohol and drug addiction and mother's depression were associated with reactive attachment disorder in children. The nationwide population-based study is the most extensive study on the risk factors of RAD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Payments to physicians may increase opioid prescribing
(Society for the Study of Addiction) US doctors who receive direct payments from opioid manufacturers tend to prescribe more opioids than doctors who receive no such payments, according to new research published by Addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WSU sociologist sees environmental support slip under democratic presidents
(Washington State University) Erik Johnson has what looks like a surefire way to hurt support for spending to protect the environment: Elect a Democratic president. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers for the first time identify neurons in the human visual cortex that respond to faces
(Bar-Ilan University) A new study identifies the neurons in the human visual cortex that selectively respond to faces. The researchers showed that the neurons in the visual cortex (in the vicinity of the Fusiform Face Area) responded much more strongly to faces than to city landscapes or objects. In an additional experiment, the neurons exhibited face-selectivity to human and animal faces that appeared within a movie. The results provide unique insights into human brain functioning at the cellular level during face processing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In China, a link between happiness and air quality
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) In a paper published in the journal Nature Human Behaviour, a research team led by Siqi Zheng, the Samuel Tak Lee Associate Professor in MIT's Department of Urban Studies and Planning and Center for Real Estate, and the Faculty Director of MIT China Future City Lab, reveals that higher levels of pollution are associated with a decrease in people's happiness levels. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study: On Facebook and Twitter your privacy is at risk -- even if you don't have an account
(University of Vermont) New research shows that on social media, like Facebook, privacy can be at risk, even if a person doesn't have an account. Scientists at the University of Vermont demonstrated that a person's identity and actions can be predicted from their friend's posts and writings online. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Managing gender dysphoria in adolescents: A practical guide for family physicians
(Canadian Medical Association Journal) As a growing number of adolescents identify as transgender, a review aims to help primary care physicians care for this vulnerable group and its unique needs. The review, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at emerging evidence for managing gender dysphoria, including social and medical approaches for youth who are transitioning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers conduct first population-based study of suicide risk in people with autism
(University of Utah Health) Researchers at the University of Utah Health conducted the first population-based study of suicidality in individuals with ASD in the United States. The 20-year retrospective study found that for individuals with autism, particularly females, the risk of suicide has increased through time compared to their non-autistic peers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain training app improves users' concentration, study shows
(University of Cambridge) A new 'brain training' game designed by researchers at the University of Cambridge improves users' concentration, according to new research published today. The scientists behind the venture say this could provide a welcome antidote to the daily distractions that we face in a busy world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seven UNIST researchers named 'world's most highly cited researchers'
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) Seven faculty members of South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) have distinguished themselves with inclusion in the Global Highly Cited Researchers 2018 List. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST student wins prestigious 2018 Red Dot Award: Design concept
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) A student, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has been named a winner of the 2018 prestigious " Red Dot Award " for design concept. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene therapy promotes nerve regeneration
(Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience - KNAW) Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the Leiden University Medical Center have shown that treatment using gene therapy leads to a faster recovery after nerve damage. By combining a surgical repair procedure with gene therapy, the survival of nerve cells and regeneration of nerve fibers over a long distance was stimulated. The discovery, published in Brain, is an important step towards the development of a new treatment for people with nerve damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is marketing of opioids to physicians associated with overdose deaths?
This study examined the association between pharmaceutical company marketing of opioids to physicians and subsequent death from prescription opioid overdoses across US counties. The study, which analyzed industry marketing information data and national data on opioid prescribing and overdose deaths, reports almost $40 million in opioid marketing was targeted to more than 67,500 physicians across more than 2,200 counties from August 2013 to December 2015. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST professor honored with '2018 National Top 12 R & D Performance'
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) Recent work by Professor Eunmi Choi at South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has been honored with '2018 National Top 12 R&D Performance'. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UNIST faculty member named as potential Nobel Prize winner
(Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology(UNIST)) Distinguished Professor Rodney S. Ruoff from South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has been named among '2018 Citation Laureates' by Clarivate Analytics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers examine how musicians communicate non-verbally during performance
(McMaster University) A team of researchers from McMaster University has discovered a new technique to examine how musicians intuitively coordinate with one another during a performance, silently predicting how each will express the music. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does being bilingual make children more focused? Study says no
(University of Tennessee at Knoxville) Bilingual children do not have more advantages than monolingual children when it comes to executive function, which includes remembering instructions, controlling responses, and shifting swiftly between tasks, according to a new study published in PLOS One. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ESMT professor awarded with Nelson Prize for work on crowd science
(ESMT Berlin) Henry Sauermann, associate professor of strategy at ESMT Berlin, has been awarded with the 2018 Richard R. Nelson Prize for his research on 'crowd science'. The term refers to scientific projects that actively involve the general public in the research process and are typically organized via online platforms--ranging from discovering new planets to collecting data on bird migration to solving math problems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fighting deadly drug resistant bacteria in intestines with new antibiotic
(Flinders University) Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a potentially deadly infection in the large intestine most common in people who need to take antibiotics for a long period of time, particularly in Australia's ageing population. But when doses of a new antibiotic called Ramizol were given to hamsters infected with a lethal dose of the bacteria, a significant proportion of hamsters survived the infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New survey identifies the social influences in people attending A & E
(University of Liverpool) A survey of 20 disadvantaged neighborhoods across the North West (UK) has revealed the social influences on why people attend their local Accident& Emergency department. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Erucic acid
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) Erucic acid occurs in vegetable oils and fats. It is a natural component of plant seeds of the Brassicaceae family (crucifers such as rape and mustard). Chemically, it is a long-chain, simple, unsaturated omega-9 fatty acid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain vital signs capture undetected impairments in ice hockey players with concussions
(Chiang Public Relations) A team of brain researchers have published results from a multi-year hockey concussion study, which tracked young Junior A male ice hockey players using a new brainwave monitoring method called 'brain vital signs.' The study showed that 'brain vital signs' -- a breakthrough for analyzing complex brainwave data to provide a simple and objective physiological evaluation of brain function -- is more sensitive in detecting brain function changes related to concussion than existing clinical tests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Local focus could help tackle global problems
(University of Exeter) People's love for their local areas could be harnessed to tackle global environmental problems, researchers say. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What happened 4,000 years ago in the Urals?
(Goethe University Frankfurt) In collaboration with researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz and Russian colleagues, archaeologists from Goethe University want to find out what could have led to major transformations in the way of life in the Urals in the second millennium BC. The project has been awarded funds of € 600,000 by the German Research Foundation, initially up until the end of 2020. The research work follows on from an earlier project undertaken between 2009 and 2014. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Epigenetics contribute to male and female differences in fear memory
(Elsevier) In a mouse model of traumatic memory, male mice recall fear-related memories better than female mice, according to a study in Biological Psychiatry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study highlights lack of fair access to urban green spaces
(University of British Columbia) People with higher incomes and more education tend to have greater access to urban green spaces than their less privileged neighbors, a new University of British Columbia study of parks and greenery in 10 major North American cities has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coming soon: A blood test for Alzheimer's disease?
(American Chemical Society) People with symptoms of Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as cognitive difficulties, behavior changes and mood swings, may wait months or even years to get a definitive diagnosis. That's because doctors lack a simple, accurate and inexpensive test for it. But according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are getting much closer to developing the elusive blood test for AD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Reinforcement learning expedites 'tuning' of robotic prosthetics
(North Carolina State University) Researchers have developed an intelligent system for 'tuning' powered prosthetic knees, allowing patients to walk comfortably with the prosthetic device in minutes, rather than the hours necessary if the device is tuned by a trained clinical practitioner. The system is the first to rely solely on reinforcement learning to tune the robotic prosthesis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WPI computer scientist developing new technology to 'contain' hackers' attacks
(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) With support from the National Science Foundation, a computer scientist at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is developing a new technology to protect companies -- and computer users -- from malware attacks. Known as single-use services or 'containerization,' the technology aims to prevent an attack on a website from compromising other servers, data, and users. Instead of being given direct access to the webserver, each user interacts with a temporary copy that is destroyed when the session ends. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How the human brain works during simultaneous interpretation
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Researchers at the Centre for Bioelectric Interfaces and the Centre for Cognition& Decision Making of the Higher School of Economics utilized electroencephalogram (EEG) and the event-related potential (ERP) technique to study neural activity during simultaneous interpretation of continuous prose. Using event-related potentials as an index of depth of attention to the sounding fragment, the researchers assessed the competition between memory and auditory perception during simultaneous interpretation. The results of the study were published in the journal PLOS ONE...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Awareness is barrier to 'plastic-free periods'
(Anglia Ruskin University) New research indicates that more needs to be done to raise awareness of the amount of plastic contained in commonly-used menstrual products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Telling stories using rhythmic gesture helps children improve their oral skills
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) For the first time it has been shown that a brief training session with rhythmic gestures has immediate benefits for narrative discourse in children of 5 and 6 years of age in a study published recently in Developmental Psychology led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor and coordinator of the Prosodic Studies Group and of the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, together with her collaborators, Ingrid Vil à -Gim é nez and Alfonso Igualada (Cognition and Language Research Group, Open University of Catalonia). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can a critic-turned-believer sway others? The case of genetically modified foods
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) When an advocate for one side of an issue announces that he or she now believes the opposite, can that message affect others' views? Research from the Annenberg Public Policy Center shows that such a conversion message can influence public attitudes. Using video of environmentalist Mark Lynas speaking about his change from an opponent of genetically modified crops to an advocate, researchers found that message had a greater impact than his direct advocacy message. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2017 Women's March solidarity events drew 100 times national protest average, study shows
(University of Notre Dame) Based on a survey of sister marches across the United States, key characteristics of the events were massive turnout, majority female leadership, low rate of counterdemonstrators, substantial grassroots mobilization and strong support from faith-based groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

J-PAL and Pratham awarded philanthropic funding toward education systems change
(Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab) On January 15, Co-Impact, a global philanthropic collaborative for systems change, announced a commitment of US$80 million and technical support to five initiatives with proven systems changing strategies in education, health, and economic opportunity. Teaching at the Right Level (TaRL) Africa, led jointly by MIT's Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) and the Indian NGO Pratham, was selected as one of the five initiatives receiving funding under this commitment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds dangerous increases in patients mixing opioids, benzodiazepines or Z-drugs
(St. Michael's Hospital) The number of Americans taking a dangerous combination of both opioids and benzodiazepines -- a group of drugs commonly prescribed for pain, insomnia and anxiety -- increased by 250 percent over a 15-year period, while there was an 850 percent increase in patients taking benzodiazepines and so-called Z-drugs, according to a new study published in the journal Sleep. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers led By Georgia State economist find a global tax on carbon may be feasible
(Georgia State University) There is a consistently high level of public support across nations for a global carbon tax if the tax policy is carefully designed, according to a survey of people in the United States, India, the United Kingdom, South Africa and Australia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Wearable sensor can detect hidden anxiety, depression in young children
(University of Vermont) Anxiety and depression in young children are hard to detect and often go untreated, potentially leading to anxiety disorders and increased risk of suicide and drug abuse later. In a PLOS ONE study, researchers showed a wearable sensor detected these 'internalizing disorders' in children with 81 percent accuracy, reducing to 20 seconds what would take clinicians months to diagnose, opening the door to inexpensive screening that could be part of routine developmental assessments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protecting oligodendrocytes may reduce the impact of multiple sclerosis
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating inflammatory disorder in which autoreactive T cells migrate into the central nervous tissue and damage oligodendrocytes and myelin, which protect nerve cells. Sephin1 prolongs a cytoprotective response in oligodendrocytes, protecting those cells and myelin from this inflammatory attack. It dampens central nervous system inflammation, limits myelin damage and reduces the reactivation of T cells (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moving more in old age may be linked to sharper memory
(American Academy of Neurology) Older adults who move more, either with daily exercise or even simple routine physical activity like housework, may preserve more of their memory and thinking skills, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study published in the Jan. 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An ancient relative of humans shows a surprisingly modern trait
(Ohio State University) A relative of modern humans that lived at least 104,000 years ago in northern China showed evidence of dental growth and development very similar to that of people today, a new study found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moving more in old age may protect brain from dementia
(Rush University Medical Center) lder adults who move more than average, either in the form of daily exercise or just routine physical activity such as housework, may maintain more of their memory and thinking skills than people who are less active than average, even if they have brain lesions or biomarkers linked to dementia, according to a study by Rush University Medical Center published in the January 16, 2019, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Poll: Majority of millennials do not like Trump, Twitter
(University of Massachusetts Lowell) A new national poll of millennials looks at opinions on President Trump, social media, key issues and potential 2020 presidential candidates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Schizophrenia linked to genetic structural abnormality in adolescent brain
(University of Warwick) Schizophrenia could be caused by a genetic mutation that causes a structural abnormality in the brain during adolescence. Therefore testing for the gene SLC39A8, and brain scans for schizophrenia could predict whether or not someone will develop it -- researchers at the University of Warwick have found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Born to run: just not on cocaine
(Florida Atlantic University) A study finds a surprising response to cocaine in a novel strain of mutant mice -- they failed to show hyperactivity seen in normal mice when given cocaine and didn't run around. In other tests, they still found cocaine appealing, but displayed an inability to shake the memory of cocaine's actions when the drug was no longer administered. The key change that blocks cocaine's stimulant effects in these mice is serotonin, not dopamine, which is responsible for producing a high. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Identifying 'friends' in an objective manner
(Kobe University) Dr. Teruyoshi Kobayashi of Kobe University and his team developed a new method for identifying individuals that have essential connections between them -- what they call 'significant ties'. Dr. Kobayashi says: " The point is that we need to distinguish between the contact events that could happen by chance and the events that would not happen without a significant relationship between two individuals. " Their findings were published in Nature Communications on January 15. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nudging does not necessarily improve decisions
(University of Zurich) Nudging, the concept of influencing people's behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and itis often viewed as a one-size-fits-all solution. Now, a study by researchers from the University of Zurich puts things into perspective: Whether a nudge really does improve decisions depends on a person's underlying decision-making process. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Statistics anxiety' is real, and new research suggests targeted ways to handle it
(University of Kansas) A new study uses an analytical technique called 'network science' to determine factors contributing to statistics anxiety among psychology majors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best
(Cornell University) Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army researchers explore benefits of immersive technology for soldiers
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Army researchers are exploring the benefits of immersive technology for warfighters. They have developed a platform to assess this technology called AURORA-MR. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news