AGS honors expert and emerging geriatrics leaders of 2020
(American Geriatrics Society) The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) annually honors researchers, clinicians, educators, and emerging health professionals who have made outstanding contributions to high-quality, person-centered care for older people. This year's award recipients include more than 20 leaders representing the breadth of disciplines championing care for us all as we age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forecasting urbanization
(University of Delaware) A new global simulation model offers the first long-term look at how urbanization -- the growth of cities and towns--will unfold in the coming decades. The research team projects the total amount of urban areas on Earth can grow anywhere from 1.8 to 5.9-fold by 2100, building approximately 618,000 square miles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dearth of medical resources in Africa for COVID-19 reminiscent of early HIV/AIDS pandemic
(Georgetown University Medical Center) 'We have seen this before.' Global health scholars have issued a clarion call about the needless loss of life expected because of a foreseeable prospect of 'slow and inadequate access to supplies' to control COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa. They say what is unfolding now is similar to when lifesaving diagnostics and treatments came to the region long after they were available elsewhere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What are your chances of having a second IVF baby after fertility treatment for the first?
(European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology) As the restrictions on fertility clinics start to be lifted and IVF treatment resumes, research published in Human Reproduction journal offers reassuring news to women who have had to delay their treatment for a second IVF baby because of the coronavirus. The study analysed data from women in Australia and New Zealand to assess, for the first time, their chances of having a second child with the help of fertility treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 baby boom? This new study suggests perhaps not
(Taylor& Francis Group) Over 80% of people surveyed in a study do not plan to conceive during the COVID-19 crisis, perhaps putting to rest suggestions that the lockdown could lead to rise in birth numbers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Middle age may be much more stressful now than in the '90s
(Penn State) A new Penn State study found that life may be more stressful now than it was in the 1990s, especially for people between the ages of 45 and 64. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Twitter -- not just pointless babble
(Queensland University of Technology) It started life as the concept drawing for a mobile 'status update' tool only geeks could love. Now we cannot imagine a world without Twitter, its hashtags, and the worldwide movements it has helped create. A new book tracks its journey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Delaying bariatric and metabolic surgery during COVID-19 pandemic puts patients at risk, experts warn
(King's College London) New guidance identifies patients with the greatest need for bariatric and metabolic surgery as experts warn delaying treatment could put them at a greater risk of complications from their disease as well as from COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stirling projects to safeguard wellbeing of carers during pandemic
(University of Stirling) Three University of Stirling projects will play a key role in safeguarding carers and support workers during the COVID-19 pandemic -- and assessing the impact the experience has on them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can we estimate the time until the next recession?
(International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis) As the world economy is falling into one of the biggest contractions of the last decades, a new study of economic recession patterns finds that the likelihood of a downturn was high even before the onset of the Coronavirus crisis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Variance in tree species results in the cleanest urban air
(University of Helsinki) What kind of an effect do trees have on aerosol particle concentrations in cities? Modelling carried out at the University of Helsinki revealed that the air was cleanest on the street level with three rows of trees of variable height situated along boulevard-type city street canyons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using digital twins to design more sustainable cities
(Gauss Centre for Supercomputing) Over the past several years, a collaboration at HLRS has been developing a digital twin of Herrenberg, a small city just outside of Stuttgart, Germany. The Herrenberg study has already provided valuable information for city planners and government officials in the state of Baden-W ü rttemberg, and paves the way for improving the model to include additional kinds of data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Do I look mad? Reading facial cues with the touch-screen generation
(University of California - Los Angeles) Are today's children, who grew up with mobile technology from birth, worse at reading emotions and picking up cues from people's faces than children who didn't grow up with tablets and smartphones? A new UCLA psychology study suggests today's kids are all right. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep difficulties linked to altered brain development in infants who late
(University of Washington) New research led by the University of Washington finds that sleep problems in a baby's first 12 months may not only precede an autism diagnosis, but also may be associated with altered growth trajectory in a key part of the brain, the hippocampus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How nonprofits can boost donations using the marketing mix
(American Marketing Association) Nonprofits may better meet their missions by learning to effectively employ the entirety of the marketing mix to attract individuals to available donation opportunities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 7, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTEP researcher earns NSF grant for COVID study
(University of Texas at El Paso) The National Science Foundation has approved a $114,000 RAPID award to The University of Texas at El Paso's April Gile Thomas, Ph.D., assistant professor psychology, to conduct research related to COVID-19. The study began May 1 and will involve 105 adolescents and parents from throughout El Paso, to include some who are incarcerated or on probation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Police stop fewer black drivers at night when a 'veil of darkness' obscures their race
(Stanford School of Engineering) After analyzing 95 million traffic stop records, filed by officers with 21 state patrol agencies and 35 municipal police forces from 2011 to 2018, a Stanford-led research team concluded that 'police stops and search decisions suffer from persistent racial bias.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Events of the past can help us make decisions during the crises of today
(University of East Anglia) Making good decisions during difficult situations -- such as the COVID-19 pandemic -- is the subject of a new book by an academic at the University of East Anglia (UEA).Prompted by the unfolding coronavirus crisis, behavioural economist Dr Sheheryar Banuri looks at what we can learn from past actions in similar events to help give ourselves the best possible chance of choosing wisely. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cognitive therapy can help treat anxiety in children with autism
(Wiley) Cognitive behavioural therapy and other psychosocial interventions are effective for treating anxiety in school-aged children with autism spectrum disorder, according to an analysis of all relevant studies published in 2005-2018. The findings are published in Campbell Systematic Reviews. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cost-benefit analysis of funding a smoking cessation program before surgery
(Wiley) For patients undergoing surgery, smoking is linked with a higher risk of experiencing complications following their procedure, and quitting smoking before surgery may help reduce this risk. A new BJS (formerly British Journal of Surgery) study examined whether a smoking cessation intervention before surgery is economically worthwhile when funded by the National Health System (NHS) in Spain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Use of emergency contraceptive pills among Scandinavian women
(Wiley) Use of emergency contraceptive pills (ECPs) is common among Scandinavian women, with one-third having used them at least once, according to a study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Day services benefit patients with Alzheimer's disease
(Wiley) Day services--programs designed to provide stimulation in a safe environment during the day for adults with physical and mental impairments -- may help improve the cognitive function of adults with Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in Psychogeriatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Work-related PTSD in nurses
(Wiley) A recent Journal of Clinical Nursing analysis of published studies examined the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among nurses and identified factors associated with work-related PTSD among nurses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What influences adolescents to continuously use e-cigarettes?
(Wiley) In a Public Health Nursing study of adolescents who have used e-cigarettes in the past month, certain factors were associated with frequent use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Demand for US hospital inpatient, intensive care unit beds for patients with COVID-19
(JAMA Network) The intensive care unit and inpatient bed needs for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in two cities in China are described and compared to estimate the peak number of intensive care unit beds needed in US cities if an outbreak equivalent to that in Wuhan occurs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds 'volume dial' for turning neural communication up or down
(Picower Institute at MIT) MIT neuroscientists find that the protein Synaptotagmin 7 limits the supply of neurotransmitter-containing vesicles for release at synapses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could hotel service robots help the hospitality industry after COVID-19?
(University of Surrey) A new research study, investigating how service robots in hotels could help redefine leadership and boost the hospitality industry, has taken on new significance in the light of the seismic impact of the Covid-19 outbreak on tourism and business travel. The study by academics at The University of Surrey and MODUL University Vienna focuses on how HR experts perceive service robots and their impact on leadership and HR management in the hotel industry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Terrible twos' not inevitable: With engaged parenting, happy babies can become happy toddlers
(University of Cambridge) Parents should not feel pressured to make their young children undertake structured learning or achieve specific tasks, particularly during lockdown. A new study of children under the age of two has found that parents who take a more flexible approach to their child's learning can - for children who were easy babies - minimise behavioural problems during toddlerhood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Birth and pregnancy experts fail to deliver on contraception advice
(Flinders University) Health care professionals who provide contraceptive services outside of general practice are unlikely to discuss long-acting reversible contraception such as intrauterine devices (IUDs) or implants for women without children -- despite their proven safety, effectiveness and convenience.A review published in the Journal of Clinical Nursing analysed the views of non-GP practitioners often tasked with delivering contraceptive advice. It found lack of knowledge, time constraints and inaccurate personal beliefs shaped their reluctance to recommend these superior contraception methods. (Source: EurekAlert! ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The unexpected benefits of tailored exercise for aged care residents
(Edith Cowan University) Tailored exercise programs led by accredited exercise physiologists don't just provide physical benefits for residents living in aged care -- they improve mental wellbeing and social engagement, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Workers happy despite crisis and uncertainty
(University of Zurich) In general, workers in Switzerland and Germany are coping well with the COVID-19 crisis and the associated social disruption. They are feeling happier and finding it easier to unwind and balance work and private life. They are also more engaged at work than last year, a survey among 600 participants carried out by researchers of the University of Zurich shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We believe we're less likely than others are to fall for online scams
(New York University) We believe we are less likely than others are to fall for phishing scams, thereby underestimating our own exposure to risk, a new cybersecurity study has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Public would obey major changes to antibiotic advice, research shows
(University of Exeter) The public would comply with major changes to medical advice - but would then be less likely to follow other new guidelines in the future, research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Living in a rural environment enhances mental well-being among the elderly
(Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona) The mental well-being of the elderly refers to how they perceive their everyday existence, i.e., if their outlook is positive or negative, which, in turn, makes their life pleasant or unpleasant.The positive feeling of emotional well-being allows people to live fully and feel integrated in society; moreover, people enjoying good mental health are better capacitated to recover from sudden illness, change or misfortune. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Home Office funded report urges greater action for cybercrime victims
(University of Portsmouth) The first major UK study into victims of computer misuse crime has exposed the serious harm some victim's experience, as well as barriers to reporting such offences, receiving support, achieving justice and the precarious resources dedicated by the police to cybercrime. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Old democracies cope better with severe crisis than newer ones
(University of Gothenburg) In established democracies with long experience of democracy, the risk of democratic breakdown, in the face of a crisis like the current corona-crisis, is low. The outlook is very different for new democracies, especially those with weak civil society and weak political parties, according to research from the University of Gothenburg. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trump's election didn't cause a large increase in depression among US Democrats
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) " Broadly speaking, our data suggest that America did not get more depressed because of Trump, at least in the first year after his election, " says Prof. Michael Gilead, who heads the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Symbolic Cognition and Interaction Lab. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds stronger links between automation and inequality
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A new study co-authored by an MIT economist suggests automation has a bigger impact on the labor market and income inequality than previous research would indicate -- and identifies the year 1987 as a key inflection point in this process, the moment when jobs lost to automation stopped being replaced by an equal number of similar workplace opportunities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Car sharing minus the driver
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) In 15 years, the share of self-driving passenger vehicles on Moscow's roads will exceed 60%. However, this change will not have a significant impact if personal vehicle travel is not reduced and car sharing services are not expanded. For the first time, HSE University researchers have assessed the effects of self-driving cars on the city. In their study, Alexei Zomarev and Maria Rozhenko lay out predictions for 2030 and 2035. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More berries, apples and tea may have protective benefits against Alzheimer's
(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) Older adults with low intake of foods and drinks containing flavonoids, such as berries, apples, and tea, were more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and related dementias over 20 years, compared with people who consumed more of those items, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Laws that punish pregnant drug abusers aren't working, new study finds
(University of Central Florida) A new study shows that laws that punish substance use during pregnancy actually do more harm than good.These unintended consequences include keeping women from getting the treatment they need and failing to reduce the number of babies addicted to drugs.The study, which was published Monday in the journal Health Affairs, compared the effects of punitive polices in states that implemented them and those that didn't. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Colorado emergency departments take new steps to prevent youth suicide
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) new study conducted in seven Front Range emergency departments demonstrated success in helping parents make their homes safer when a teen is distressed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cognition and gait speed often decline together, study shows
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) Measures of cognition and gait speed largely paralleled each other in a San Antonio study of 370 participants that included 9 ½ years of follow-up. One-fifth of participants were classified into a cognitive and physical vulnerability group. Mexican American participants were almost four times more likely than European Americans to be in the cognitive and physical vulnerability group. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
(Northwestern University) Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How race affects listening during political conversations
(Ohio State University) A new study offers a rare look at how black and white people listen to each other during political discussions, including those that touch on controversial issues about race. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New book shows how ancient Greek writing helps us understand today's environmental crises
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) University of Illinois classics professor Clara Bosak-Schroeder writes about how the ancient Greeks thought about natural resources and how it is relevant to responding to climate change today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robots help some firms, even while workers across industries struggle
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) A new study co-authored by an MIT professor reveals an important pattern: Firms that move quickly to use robots tend to add workers to their payroll, while industry job losses are more concentrated in firms that make this change more slowly. The study, by MIT economist Daron Acemoglu, examines the introduction of robots to French manufacturing in recent decades, illuminating the business dynamics and labor implications in granular detail. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Evaluation of pedestrian walking speed change patterns at crosswalks in Palestine
(Bentham Science Publishers) One of the main pedestrian issues considered in facilities and traffic signal design is pedestrian walking speed. It is, therefore, necessary to evaluate the walking speed change patterns at crosswalks and the appropriate design walking speed for pedestrians, which can then be used to design pedestrian facilities and traffic signals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Considering how many firms can meet pollutant standards can spur green tech development
(Carnegie Mellon University) A new study developed a model of regulation in which the probability of a stricter standard being enacted increased with the proportion of firms in an industry that could meet the standard. The study found that regulations that consider the proportion of firms that can meet the new standard can motivate the development of a new green technology more effectively than regulations that do not consider this factor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Timing of maturity, feelings about ethnicity and race can positively affect black males' self-concept, well-being
(Society for Research in Child Development) Black males start puberty at younger ages than males of other racial or ethnic groups, and early puberty has been linked to risks for negative outcomes, yet we know little about how black males navigate the changes in their bodies or understand their social identities. A new study explored how young African-American and Caribbean black males understand these matters and how variations in their understanding affect their self-concept and well-being. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news