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Concomitant Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Influenza B Virus Pneumonia in a Child without Evidence of Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infection
We describe an 8-year-old boy who was admitted to our hospital with pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae and influenza B virus without evidence of influenza A (H5N1) virus infection, during a concurrent H5N1 virus outbreak among domestic chickens in Kelantan, a state in Malaysia. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Azian Harun, Chan Yean Yean, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mimi Azliha Abu Bakar Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Promoting Good Laboratory Practices for Waived Infectious Disease and Provider-Performed Microscopy Testing
Laboratory testing at the point of patient care was documented hundreds of years ago and has greatly expanded in the last 25 years due to improvements in technology, miniaturization, and the availability of rapid tests for a wide variety of analytes and microorganisms. Since the implementation of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, the number of non-traditional testing sites that provide testing with minimal oversight through a Certificate of Waiver (CW) or Certificate of Provider-Performed Microscopy (PPM) has increased. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Nancy Anderson, Heather Stang Source Type: news

Lab Tests Online: a Ground-Breaking and Enduring Health Resource
Long before patients were allowed to order lab tests themselves, many patients were confused about even routine tests that their doctor ordered. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry recognized early on the need for concise, peer-reviewed descriptions of individual tests. They set up a system that discussed (i) the reason to get tested, (ii) when to get tested, (iii) the sample required, (iv) any test preparation needed, (v) what was being tested, (vi) when the test should be ordered, and (vii) what the test result meant. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 2, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Dominique Smith Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 2, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Laboratory Diagnosis of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Infections in Bronchiectasis Patients: Issues and Controversies
Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental microbes that can cause pulmonary infection and are especially problematic in bronchiectasis patients with or without cystic fibrosis (CF). Microbiological identification of NTM in these patients is difficult given the high microbial burden in the lungs and the need to differentiate between colonization and transient and true infection. Determining if and when to initiate antimicrobial treatment against this multi-drug-resistant group of organisms is also challenging. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Kara J. Levinson, Peter H. Gilligan Source Type: news

USPS Statement of Ownership
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Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Frequent Relapse of Plasmodium vivax Infection: Case Report and Literature Review
We describe a 52-year-old man with frequent episodes of reoccurring Plasmodium vivax infection that was successfully treated with a combination of artemether-lumefantrine and primaquine. This is the first reported case of relapsing P. vivax infection in Malaysia that was successfully treated with this ACT. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Habsah Hasan, Zeehaida Mohamed, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

The Changing Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Valley Fever
Coccidioidomycosis, commonly known as valley fever, is a disease caused by two species of fungi, Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii. Coccidioidomycosis is often self-limiting; however, in some patients, the disease can rapidly progress to a severe and potentially life-threatening illness. Proper diagnostics for coccidioidomycosis are important because acute disease can manifest as community-acquired pneumonia, and can be misdiagnosed as a viral or bacterial infection. Improper diagnosis can lead to unnecessary antibacterial therapy and may encourage extra-pulmonary proliferation of the fungus, which then requi...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Bridget M. Barker Source Type: news

Point-of-Care Testing for Group A Streptococcus Infection and Influenza
Point of care (POC) testing has emerged as a critical tool in the early and rapid diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. While the mainstay of these POC tests has been lateral-flow-based antigen detection assays, recent technological advances in nucleic acid detection combined with regulatory changes has allowed more sensitive detection of infectious etiologies in the near-patient setting. This advancement is particularly impactful in the ambulatory setting, where rapid diagnosis can ensure appropriate treatment at the early stages of infection, both preventing more serious sequelae and also improving physician wo...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jennifer Woo, Valerie Arboleda, Omai B. Garner Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

The Emergence of Streptococcus anginosus Group as a Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen
Molecular profiling studies have identified potential emerging pathogens, such as Streptococcus anginosus group, that may play a role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease by either directly causing infection or upregulating the virulence factors of classic CF pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Routine surveillance of CF pathogens using traditional microbiology culture guides treatment and management of CF patients; however, routine CF culture protocols have not been modified to select for, detect, and further determine the role these emerging pathogens play in the progression of CF lung disease. (Source: Clinical M...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Emily M. Hill Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Clinical Impact of Multiplex Syndromic Panels in the Diagnosis of Bloodstream, Gastrointestinal, Respiratory, and Central Nervous System Infections
Recent technological advances are revolutionizing clinical microbiology. In place of the traditional diagnostic approach in which a clinician suspecting an infectious disease is required to test for the most likely etiology, perform follow-up testing for rarer causes, and then perhaps be left with a diagnosis of exclusion, many laboratories are now offering multiplex syndromic panels to provide a comprehensive diagnostic approach to bloodstream, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and central nervous system infections. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: April N. Abbott, Ferric C. Fang Source Type: news

Campylobacter fetus Pleuropneumonia and Bacteremia in an Adult Immunocompetent Patient
Campylobacter fetus is a commensal in the intestinal tract of many domestic animals but can also cause infections in animals and humans [1]. Campylobacter species usually cause acute gastrointestinal infections, with Campylobacter jejuni being the most frequent cause. C. fetus is rarely isolated and mainly causes infections in neonates, elderly persons, immunocompromised patients, and those having underlying chronic diseases [2]. Few cases of C. fetus infection in immunocompetent individuals have been reported [3,4]. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 17, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Boris Luk šić, Svjetlana Karabuva, Marina Radić, Jakica Karanović, Bruno Lukšić Source Type: news

Rapid Molecular Panels: What Is in the Best Interest of the Patient? A Review of Patient Outcome Studies for Multiplex Panels Used in Bloodstream, Respiratory, and Neurological Infections
In the clinical microbiology laboratory, the focus when choosing new tests is often on performance, turnaround time, and labor needs. This review examines available rapid, multiplexed tests from a different perspective: that of the patient. It considers whether published evidence supports the notion that use of rapid, on-demand tests (as opposed to batched testing) leads to better patient outcomes and whether broad, syndrome-based, multiplexed panels translate into better patient care than narrower monoplex or duplex assays. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 10, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Kaede V. Sullivan Source Type: news

Lactococcus garviae Prosthetic Mitral Valve Endocarditis: a Case Report and Literature Review
We report a new case of L. garviae prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis that was managed with antibiotic therapy alone. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 10, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Ewout Landeloos, Guy Van Camp, Hans De Beenhouwer Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

A Special Invitation to Authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 10, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Fatal Wohlfahrtiimonas chitiniclastica Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient
We report the first fatal case of Wohlfahrtiimonas chitiniclastica bacteremia in Malaysia, confirmed by 16S rRNA sequencing. The isolate was originally misidentified when two different, commercially available identification systems were used. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 8, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Siti Suraiya, Nik Zuraina, Fadzhilah Ahmad, Zaidah Abdul Rahman Source Type: news

Atopobium vaginae Bacteremia Associated with a Subchorionic Hematoma
We report a case of an Atopobium vaginae and Dialister micraerophilus bacteremia in an HIV-positive, pregnant woman diagnosed with a subchorionic hematoma by using a prenatal ultrasound scan. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 8, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Hugues Jacqmin, Paul deMunter, Jan Verhaegen, Liesbeth Lewi Source Type: news

Right-Sizing Technology in the Era of Consumer-Driven Health Care
Technology for modern clinical and public health microbiology laboratories has evolved at an impressive rate over the last two decades. Contemporary diagnostics can rapidly provide powerful data that can impact patient lives and support infectious disease outbreak investigations. At the same time, dramatic changes to health care delivery are putting new pressures on a system that is now focusing on patient-centric, value-driven, convenient care. For laboratories, balancing all these demands in a cost-contained environment remains a challenge. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Eszter Deak, Elizabeth M. Marlowe Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Best Practices in Diagnosing Respiratory Viral Disease
We describe several strategies for using these assays to best serve patient needs while accounting for the infrastructure and resources of the testing facility. In this context, the pros and cons of testing strategies using specific patient-centered approaches, as well as testing strategies using more simplified broad approaches, are discussed. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 6, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Abraham J. Qavi, Neil W. Anderson Source Type: news

Clinical microbiology Q & A
A 2-week-old boy is brought to the emergency department with fevers and fussiness. He appears very ill, so a lumbar puncture is performed. Blood cultures are also collected. The Gram stain of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shows abundant polymorphonuclear cells and moderate Gram-negative rods. A photo of the CSF Gram stain is shown in Fig. 1. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 6, 2017 Category: Microbiology Tags: Q & A Source Type: news

Candida auris for the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: Not Your Grandfather's Candida Species
Candida auris is a newly emerging species that was first identified in Asia in 2009 but has rapidly spread across the world. C. auris differs from most other Candida species in that antifungal resistance is the norm rather than the exception, it is a commensal of human skin rather than the human gut, and it can be easily transmitted from person to person in a health care setting. This review discusses the emergence of C. auris, global epidemiology, identification, antifungal susceptibility testing, and precautions to be taken when it is identified from a patient specimen. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Shawn R. Lockhart, Elizabeth L. Berkow, Nancy Chow, Rory M. Welsh Source Type: news

Chryseobacterium indologenes Urinary Tract Infection: a Case Report
The genus Chryseobacterium consists of Gram-negative, nonfermentative, nonmotile, catalase- and oxidase-positive, aerobic bacilli. Chryseobacterium meningosepticum is the most pathogenic species of the genus, but Chryseobacterium indologenes is a common cause of infection in immunocompromised patients or those with various indwelling devices [1]. C. indologenes is found in soil, on plants, and in both fresh and sea water. Despite its extensive distribution in nature and its ability to survive in chlorinated drinking water, the organism is not found as normal flora in humans. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Pallavi Tripathi, Anjani Singh, Vandana Lal Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

The Potential Role of Polymerase Chain Reaction in Diagnosis of Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection: Is Viral Culture Outdated?
Even in the era of effective antiviral therapy, neonatal herpes simplex viral infection causes significant morbidity and mortality in newborns. Prompt diagnosis is the cornerstone of treatment of these infants. Outside and inside the neonatal clinical practice, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is replacing culture as a method of facilitating a speedy diagnosis of herpes simplex virus infection. New pediatric guidelines call for testing of high-risk asymptomatic infants, and thus, many more surface cultures and PCRs are being performed. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 6, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Nicole L. Samies, Swathi M. Gowtham Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 6, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Optimal use of Rapid Diagnostics in Infection Control and Prevention
Clinical laboratories have implemented rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for the identification of bacterial pathogens, with subsequent improvements in antimicrobial stewardship, but these tests may also have a role in infection prevention. Early identification of pathogens by RDTs should allow faster implementation of infection prevention strategies with the goal of reducing transmission. In this review, we assess the use of RDTs as an infection control tool by exploring their role in screening, as well as diagnosis, of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), carbapenem-resistant gram-negative organisms, Clostridi...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Mary Elizabeth Sexton, Jesse T. Jacob Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

The Multipurpose Tool of Social Media: Applications for Scientists, Science Communicators, and Educators
Social media has become the fastest way to disseminate new information, share personal experiences, and discuss scientific reports in an open-access setting. It acts as an aggregator of news and reports, a platform for education, a means of public outreach, and a tool for scientific research. Each social media service offers unique communication benefits. This review discusses how scientists are using social media to inform and learn from social media communities, concentrating on microbiology and infectious disease. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 4, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Julie M. Wolf Source Type: news

Multidrug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Issues and Controversies
The treatment of tuberculosis is complicated by the emergence of drug resistance. There are several risk factors for developing multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MDR-TB) infection, such as patient noncompliance, treatment interruption, and HIV infection. Treatment regimens for MDR-TB infection depend on the results of anti-tuberculous susceptibility testing, as well as consideration of the patient's overall health. Therapy usually consists of a combination of three or more anti-tuberculous agents. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 4, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Habsah Hasan, Siti Suraiya, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan, Alwi Muhd Besari Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 4, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Trends in Laboratory Utilization
Laboratory utilization is definitely a hot topic in clinical laboratory medicine, but what's all the buzz about? Laboratory utilization encompasses a number of efforts aimed at managing laboratory resources and improving patient care. Many laboratory utilization programs have proven to dramatically decrease clinical laboratory spending. Likewise, many have proven to benefit patient care by decreasing blood loss due to phlebotomy, reducing the risk of spurious results, and helping to get the right test for the right patient at the right time. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 22, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Sarah B. Riley Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 22, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Statistics for Method Verification of Qualitative Assays in Clinical Microbiology
Despite improvement over the last decade, inadequate method verification strategies and documentation are still common laboratory inspection deficiencies. Some of the gaps occur because microbiologists may not use scientific experiment concepts, such as experimental design, data validation, biostatistics, and electronic documentation, that can improve their verification strategies for new test methods. Other gaps occur because laboratory resources are often limited. Clinical laboratories face tough choices when they consider implementing a new test method, and this review summarizes the basic statistical concepts that micr...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 5, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Donna M. Wolk Source Type: news

Self-Collected Specimens for Infectious Disease Testing
Self-collected specimens for infectious disease testing are becoming more commonplace. There are multiple published studies demonstrating that self-collected vaginal swabs for detection of sexually transmitted pathogens are as accurate as physician-collected endocervical swabs. Similarly, self-collected penile-meatal swabs are also acceptable for detecting sexually transmitted pathogens; however, unlike self-collected vaginal swabs, penile-meatal swabs are not considered an “on-label” specimen for U.S. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Fred C. Tenover, Ellen Jo Baron, Charlotte A. Gaydos Source Type: news

Clinical Microbiology Q & A – Question
Question: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

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Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Clinical Microbiology Q & A – Answer
Answer: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Mycobacterium chimaera: Coming out of Nowhere to Dominate 2016 Infection Prevention Discussions
Mycobacterium chimaera is a bacterium of the 21st century. The organism was named in 2004 when molecular assays showed it to belong to the Mycobacterium avium complex. More specifically, it was found to be a close relative of Mycobacterium intracellulare. Merely a decade later, M. chimaera turned out to be the cause of infections associated with heater-cooler units used during open-heart surgery. There are still less than 100 confirmed cases worldwide, but the mycobacterial species has captured the attention of patients and caregivers alike because many of these infections are manifested months to years following surgery. ...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Fran Schaeffer, Brooks Kennedy, Nehemiah Landes, Ernest Trevino, Paula Vance, Alice S. Weissfeld Source Type: news

Strongyloides stercoralis Hyperinfection Causing Abdominal Pain and Hypoxia
Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode with the unique ability to replicate within humans, resulting in autoinfection. Strongyloides can cause a hyperinfection or disseminated disease that typically occurs in immunocompromised individuals [1]. Our case was unique in that our patient developed disseminated strongyloidiasis in the absence of any immunocompromising risk factors. Her initial Strongyloides infection probably resulted in an autoinfection that subsequently led to hyperinfection with severe gastrointestinal and pulmonary complications. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Rebecca Rawl, Linda Matthews, Robert L. Sautter, Martin Scobey Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

“Did I Hear You Correctly? The Organism Identified Was Corynebacterium diphtheriae?”
Diphtheria is a bacterial infection caused by Corynebacterium diphtheriae and is primarily transmitted from person to person through close physical and respiratory contact; disease can involve almost any mucous membrane and is classified depending on the anatomic site of infection. Diphtheria is an acute, toxin-mediated disease whose occurrence is characterized by periodicity and epidemic waves, with a high incidence and mortality. Once one of the leading causes of childhood death, global diphtheria incidence declined approximately 70% through implementation of widespread vaccination programs. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 18, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Betty A. Forbes Source Type: news

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Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 18, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Come in Out of the Cold: Alternatives to Freezing for Microbial Biorepositories
Biorepositories are “libraries” in which biospecimens, bacteria, or DNA and RNA extracts are stored for either clinical or research purposes. Such specimens enable modern molecular-based research and could support method verification, validation, quality control, and, in some cases, proficiency testing in clinical laboratories. Cryopreservation of extracted nucleic acids ensures the stability and longevity of DNA and RNA from patient samples, with the most common methods used for long-term storage of samples being the use of −80°C freezers or liquid nitrogen. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 4, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Erica Isaacs, Monika Schmelz Source Type: news

Erratum
In the “Clinical Microbiology Q& A ” feature which appeared in the January 1, 2017 issue of CMN (Vol. 39, No. 1), the correct answer listed on page 10 is (a), NOT (d). We apologize for this error. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 4, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Listeria monocytogenes Contamination of Ice Cream: a Rare Event That Occurred Twice in the Last Two Years
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that approximately 1,600 illnesses and 260 deaths due to Listeria monocytogenes occur annually in the United States. Most of these infections are caused by ingestion of contaminated food. The most common foods are soft cheeses, deli meats, hot dogs, raw milk, packaged salads, and cantaloupes. Thus, it was unusual for infections to occur from ice cream manufactured by Blue Bell Creameries of Brenham, Texas, in 2015, and it was even more unusual that a second ice cream manufacturer, Jeni's Splendid Ice Creams based in Columbus, Ohio, isolated L. (Source: Clinical...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Alice S. Weissfeld, Nehemiah Landes, Hannah Livesay, Ernest Trevino Source Type: news

Disseminated Nocardia farcinica Infection in a Patient with Steroid-dependent Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Case Report and Literature Review
We describe a 64-year-old female with autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) who was steroid dependent and on cyclosporine immunosuppressive therapy. Nocardia farcinica was recovered from the patient's bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimen and several blood cultures. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Habsah Hasan, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan, Alwi Muhd Besari Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

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Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 20, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news