Avoiding the Headache: Laboratory Considerations for Implementation, Utilization, and Interpretation of Multiplex Molecular Panels for the Diagnosis of Meningitis and Encephalitis, Part I
Meningitis and encephalitis are infections of the central nervous system (CNS) that can range in severity from mild and self-limiting to severe and life threatening. These infections can be caused by a number of bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens. Appropriate management of these infections is dependent upon an accurate and rapid identification of the infecting organism. Despite diagnostic advances with improved detection and turnaround time, currently, the etiological pathogen in central nervous system infections is identified in only 30 to 50% of symptomatic patients. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 11, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Blake W. Buchan Source Type: news

A special invitation to Authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - July 11, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Central Venous Catheter-Related Bloodstream Infection Caused by Brevibacterium casei in a Hematology Patient
We report a case of B. casei catheter-related bacteremia in a severely immunocompromised hematology patient. Our experience and data from other reported cases indicate that hematology patients with indwelling catheters are at increased risk for infection with unusual bacterial pathogens. These unusual pathogens should be identified accurately, especially in immunocompromised patients. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 29, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Giorgio Piccinelli, Enrico Morello, Valeria Cancelli, Alessandro Turra, Michele Malagola, Giuseppe Ravizzola, Francesca Caccuri, Domenico Russo, Arnaldo Caruso, Maria Antonia De Francesco Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Direct Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Clinical Specimens Using Nucleic Acid Amplification Tests
Tuberculosis continues to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis directly in clinical specimens using nucleic acid amplification tests enables infected patients to be placed on appropriate therapy much sooner than when results of conventional culture methods are used. The availability of rapid results also facilitates infection control measures to interrupt transmission of tuberculosis in healthcare settings. The era of commercially available molecular diagnostics for detection of M. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 29, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Ellen Jo Baron, Fred C. Tenover, Devasena Gnanashanmugam Source Type: news

Efficacy of Probiotics in Prevention and Treatment of Infectious Diseases
Deaths from infectious diseases and deep concerns about increases in microbial resistance make it necessary for scientists to develop innovative therapeutic solutions and complementary therapies. Growing evidence is available on the therapeutic effects of probiotics. There are also documents about the beneficial effects of probiotics, but it is difficult to draw a definitive conclusion regarding the results of these studies because of the small sample size, the limitations of the study methods, and the use of different strains of probiotic bacteria. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 7, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Farzaneh Mohammadzadeh Rostami, Hadis Mousavi, Morteza Rabi Nezhad Mousavi, Milad Shahsafi Source Type: news

Corynebacterium diphtheriae Infection: Two Case Reports and Literature Review
In this report, we describe two cases of C. diphtheriae infection. The first is a case of cutaneous diphtheria in a Malaysian woman caused by a toxigenic strain of C. diphtheriae. In the second case, a nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae strain was isolated from the blood of a fully vaccinated pediatric patient with underlying congenital heart disease. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - June 7, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Salmuna, Wan Amani Wan Abdul Azim, Murnihayati Hassan, Azian Harun, Siti Asma' Hasan, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mohd Rizal Mohd Zain Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Why Can't We Just Use PCR? The Role of Genotypic versus Phenotypic Testing for Antimicrobial Resistance Testing
There is a need for phenotypic susceptibility testing that is expeditious and that can be performed directly from clinical specimens. While rapid pathogen identification is important, it is the susceptibility result that is essential for antimicrobial optimization. The options for rapid susceptibility testing are limited, with the majority of commercial tests available offering genotypic resistance detection only. In this article, a laboratorian and a clinician discuss the benefits and limitations of genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility testing and provide examples of how results should be interpreted to maximize the cl...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 22, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jennifer Dien Bard, Francesca Lee Source Type: news

A special invitation to Authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 22, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Aerococcus urinae, Alloscardovia omnicolens, and Actinotignum schaalii: the AAA Minor League Team of Urinary Tract Infection Pathogens
In clinical microbiology laboratories, advancements in the methods used for routine organism identification have facilitated more accurate species level resolution. This, along with increasing knowledge regarding “new” pathogens, has provided new insights into biology and has revealed clinical associations not previously known. Aerococcus urinae, Alloscardovia omnicolens, and Actinotignum schaalii are Gram-positive bacteria associated with urinary tract infections but can also be members of the urinary t ract microbiota. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 9, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: William Lainhart, Mark D. Gonzalez Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - May 9, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Streptobacillus moniliformis Native Valve Endocarditis
We report a case of S. moniliformis native mitral valve endocarditis in a 33-year-old female who most likely acquired her infection from her pet rat. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 21, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Celeste Nelson, Russell A. Rawling, Paul A. Granato Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

The Canary in the Coal Mine: Clinical and Public Health Laboratories Respond to Biosafety Risks
This article presents an overview of responses to recent events and provides resources for laboratories that can be utilized to prepare and improve their biosafety programs. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 21, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Michael A. Pentella Source Type: news

Documenting Clinical Microbiology Impact: Performing Clinical Research to Document the Value of the Microbiology Laboratory
For those intending to achieve the maximum validity and usefulness of microbiology results, the interface between clinical medicine and diagnostic methods in laboratory medicine is a critical focus. As such, method verification studies and quality improvement projects in clinical microbiology should optimally be performed with the rigor of scientific research, even if the project intent is not clinical research. This review aims to translate the concepts of clinical research into laboratory strategies that are relevant to clinical microbiologists who are attempting to document the value of their laboratory programs. (Sourc...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 6, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Hosam A. Farag Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - April 6, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Clinical Decisions: How Relevant is Modern Bacterial Taxonomy for Clinical Microbiologists?
Bacterial taxonomy has radically changed over the past three decades largely due to innovative technologies, such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing and whole-genome sequencing (WGS). These changes have resulted in an explosion in the number of proposed new bacterial species that are based upon a very limited number of strains and changes to our perspectives on what constitutes a “bacterial species.” The format in which these new species have been proposed also presents challenges to both clinical and public health microbiologists. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 22, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: J. Michael Janda Source Type: news

Clinical Microbiology Q & A
(Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 22, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Christopher D. Doern, Jillian Raybould, Pamela Bailey Tags: Q & A Source Type: news

Documenting Clinical Microbiology Impact: Basic Concepts for Designing Clinical Studies and Outcome Research Using Principles of Biostatistics
While most clinical laboratorians do not consider themselves part of a formal clinical research group, many quality improvement projects and method verification studies are, or should be, performed with the rigor of scientific research, even if the project intent is not research. When describing pilot results for business plans and for documenting laboratory impact for interdisciplinary committees, planning for scientific rigor will prove to be very valuable. Clinical, operational, and quality improvement studies in laboratory medicine and clinical microbiology are becoming more data driven, outcome oriented, and evidence ...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - March 9, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Hosam A. Farag Source Type: news

Clinical Microbiology Q & A
(Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 23, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

40 Years of the Clinical Microbiology Newsletter
On the occasion of our retirement as editors of the Clinical Microbiology Newsletter (Newsletter), which is now in its 40th year, we are feeling a bit nostalgic. As such, we want to pay tribute to all the people who have ensured its success over the years. We want to thank our readers, who helped to make this Newsletter so successful, and the authors, who have contributed outstanding lead articles in clinical microbiology. Having worked together for so many years on the Newsletter — Betz Forbes for 12 years, Alice Weissfeld for 10 years — we were intrigued by its history. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 23, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Betty Ann Forbes, Alice S. Weissfeld Source Type: news

Digital PCR in the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory: Another Tool on the Molecular Horizon
Digital PCR was first described in 1999. Improvements in instrumentation and reagents have increased its routine use in molecular pathology laboratories. For clinical microbiology laboratories, digital PCR applications could cover a broad range of purposes, from absolute pathogen quantification to the detection of rare mutations that confer resistance to antibiotics. In this review, we describe several potential applications of digital PCR in the clinical microbiology laboratory. As this method continues to evolve, digital PCR may become an important tool on the horizon for clinical and molecular microbiology laboratories....
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 9, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Eleanor A. Powell, N. Esther Babady Source Type: news

A Farewell Tribute to Retiring CMN Editors and their Contribution to Clinical Microbiology
Elsevier and the editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter celebrate Dr. Betty A. Forbes and Dr. Alice S. Weissfeld as they retire from their editorial responsibilities after 12 and 10 years, respectively – we value their contributions to the newsletter and to the subspecialty of clinical microbiology These two women are titans in the field of clinical microbiology. They share a wide breadth of knowledge, an unending commitment to the field of diagnostic microbiology, the highest of scientific ethi cs, a tireless work ethic, and extensive talents in teaching and mentoring, all with the kindest of hearts. (Source: C...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - February 9, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Donna M. Wolk, Elizabeth M. Marlowe Tags: Feature Source Type: news

Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Due to Non-O157 Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli: Possible Need for Method Improvement
We report here a case of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in a pediatric patient, caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O145 carrying genotype stx2a eae ehxA. STEC O145 strains are part of Karmali's serotype B classification. Karmali et al. [1] proposed a serotype classification that divided STEC strains into five groups on the basis of reported frequency of outbreaks and disease severity in humans. Serotypes other than O157, termed non-O157 STEC, have also been implicated frequently in outbreaks and severe disease in humans [2]. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 18, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Mar ía José González-Abad, Mercedes Alonso Sanz Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Impact of Reflex Algorithms on Urine Culture Utilization
Urine culture is the gold standard for the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI), one of the most common causes of bacterial infection. As such, urine specimens are responsible for a major share of the workload in clinical microbiology laboratories. The inclusion of metrics, such as the catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI) rate, that factor into hospital reimbursements and concerns surrounding the attrition of clinical laboratory personnel have prompted scrutiny of urine culture utilization in many organizations. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 18, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Melanie L. Yarbrough Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 18, 2018 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Need of the Hour: Addressing the Challenges of Multi-Drug-Resistant Health Care-Associated Infections and the Role of the Laboratory in Lowering Infection Rates
Over the past two decades, we have been confronted with an increase in the frequency and diversity of multi-drug-resistant microorganisms, leading in some cases to serious and life-threatening infections. To compound the problem, during the same timeframe, we have seen a significant decrease in the number of new, FDA-approved antimicrobial agents to treat these infections. In order to understand the gravity of the problem, we need to address the reasons behind the dramatic increase in antimicrobial resistance and the consequences facing us, as well as potential solutions to the problem. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 6, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Robert L. Sautter, Diane C. Halstead Source Type: news

The Genus Shewanella: a Hard-Wired Pathogen
We report a case of Shewanella algae septicemia in an intensive care unit (ICU) patient. It is important for both clinicians and laboratorians to know how unique this organism is and to recognize its potential as a human pathogen. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 6, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Mindy M Sampson, Cuc Mai, John T. Sinnott Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Coinfection with Acinetobacter baumannii Carbapenem-Resistant and Carbapenem-Susceptible Strains
Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic pathogen that is emerging as an important cause of health care-associated infections, especially in patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) [1]. Among the carbapenem-hydrolyzing class D β-lactamases (CHDL), OXA-23-like enzymes are the most prevalent, occurring worldwide [2]. We isolated carbapenem-resistant and -susceptible A. baumannii strains from different sites in the same patient. Here, we describe the characterization of these isolates and discuss the implications of these f indings and their clinical importance. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 27, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Karyne Rangel, Daniela Betzler, Cardoso Gomes, Gabrielle Limeira Genteluci, Maria Jos é de Souza, Maria Helena Simões Villas Bôas Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Fusarium spp., a Genus of Common Plant Pathogens That Can Cause Devastating, Opportunistic Human Disease
Fusarium spp. are environmental hyaline molds that are pathogens in plants and opportunistic pathogens in humans. In immunocompetent individuals, Fusarium sp. infections primarily include keratitis, onychomycosis, and localized infections due to trauma. However, in immunocompromised patients, particularly those with hematological malignancies, members of this genus can cause devastating, invasive, and disseminated infections with high mortality. In general, these species are resistant to therapy with a variety of antifungal agents. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 27, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: William Lainhart Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 27, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Clinical Microbiology Newsletter Welcomes New Editors
Dr. Christopher Doern is currently the Associate Director of Microbiology at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System in Richmond, Virginia and an Assistant Professor of Pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine. He is board-certified by the American Board of Medical Microbiology (ABMM). In 2008, Dr. Doern received his Ph.D. in Microbiology from Wake Forest University and then completed his fellowship in Medical and Public Health Microbiology at Washington University in St. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 27, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: M. Wolk, Elizabeth M. Marlowe Tags: Announcement Source Type: news

Fastidious and Furious: Reporting Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing for Fastidious or Infrequently Isolated Bacteria
Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of fastidious bacteria is an essential yet challenging exercise for the clinical microbiology laboratory. An understanding of bacterial growth requirements is essential to ensure optimal recovery of pathogens. A working knowledge of reference methods for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, such as agar and broth microdilution, as well as knowledge of modifications to these systems, will aid the laboratory in the selection of the appropriate AST method to meet regulatory requirements and ensure quality results for patient care. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 6, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: D. Jane Hata Source Type: news

Concomitant Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Influenza B Virus Pneumonia in a Child without Evidence of Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infection
We describe an 8-year-old boy who was admitted to our hospital with pneumonia caused by M. pneumoniae and influenza B virus without evidence of influenza A (H5N1) virus infection, during a concurrent H5N1 virus outbreak among domestic chickens in Kelantan, a state in Malaysia. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Azian Harun, Chan Yean Yean, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mimi Azliha Abu Bakar Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

Promoting Good Laboratory Practices for Waived Infectious Disease and Provider-Performed Microscopy Testing
Laboratory testing at the point of patient care was documented hundreds of years ago and has greatly expanded in the last 25 years due to improvements in technology, miniaturization, and the availability of rapid tests for a wide variety of analytes and microorganisms. Since the implementation of the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, the number of non-traditional testing sites that provide testing with minimal oversight through a Certificate of Waiver (CW) or Certificate of Provider-Performed Microscopy (PPM) has increased. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Nancy Anderson, Heather Stang Source Type: news

Lab Tests Online: a Ground-Breaking and Enduring Health Resource
Long before patients were allowed to order lab tests themselves, many patients were confused about even routine tests that their doctor ordered. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry recognized early on the need for concise, peer-reviewed descriptions of individual tests. They set up a system that discussed (i) the reason to get tested, (ii) when to get tested, (iii) the sample required, (iv) any test preparation needed, (v) what was being tested, (vi) when the test should be ordered, and (vii) what the test result meant. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 2, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Dominique Smith Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - November 2, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Laboratory Diagnosis of Non-Tuberculous Mycobacterium Infections in Bronchiectasis Patients: Issues and Controversies
Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are environmental microbes that can cause pulmonary infection and are especially problematic in bronchiectasis patients with or without cystic fibrosis (CF). Microbiological identification of NTM in these patients is difficult given the high microbial burden in the lungs and the need to differentiate between colonization and transient and true infection. Determining if and when to initiate antimicrobial treatment against this multi-drug-resistant group of organisms is also challenging. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Kara J. Levinson, Peter H. Gilligan Source Type: news

USPS Statement of Ownership
(Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Frequent Relapse of Plasmodium vivax Infection: Case Report and Literature Review
We describe a 52-year-old man with frequent episodes of reoccurring Plasmodium vivax infection that was successfully treated with a combination of artemether-lumefantrine and primaquine. This is the first reported case of relapsing P. vivax infection in Malaysia that was successfully treated with this ACT. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Zeti Norfidiyati Ayub, Habsah Hasan, Zeehaida Mohamed, Alwi Muhd Besari, Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

The Changing Epidemiology and Diagnosis of Valley Fever
Coccidioidomycosis, commonly known as valley fever, is a disease caused by two species of fungi, Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii. Coccidioidomycosis is often self-limiting; however, in some patients, the disease can rapidly progress to a severe and potentially life-threatening illness. Proper diagnostics for coccidioidomycosis are important because acute disease can manifest as community-acquired pneumonia, and can be misdiagnosed as a viral or bacterial infection. Improper diagnosis can lead to unnecessary antibacterial therapy and may encourage extra-pulmonary proliferation of the fungus, which then requi...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - October 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Bridget M. Barker Source Type: news

Point-of-Care Testing for Group A Streptococcus Infection and Influenza
Point of care (POC) testing has emerged as a critical tool in the early and rapid diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. While the mainstay of these POC tests has been lateral-flow-based antigen detection assays, recent technological advances in nucleic acid detection combined with regulatory changes has allowed more sensitive detection of infectious etiologies in the near-patient setting. This advancement is particularly impactful in the ambulatory setting, where rapid diagnosis can ensure appropriate treatment at the early stages of infection, both preventing more serious sequelae and also improving physician wo...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jennifer Woo, Valerie Arboleda, Omai B. Garner Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 21, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

The Emergence of Streptococcus anginosus Group as a Cystic Fibrosis Pathogen
Molecular profiling studies have identified potential emerging pathogens, such as Streptococcus anginosus group, that may play a role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease by either directly causing infection or upregulating the virulence factors of classic CF pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Routine surveillance of CF pathogens using traditional microbiology culture guides treatment and management of CF patients; however, routine CF culture protocols have not been modified to select for, detect, and further determine the role these emerging pathogens play in the progression of CF lung disease. (Source: Clinical M...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Emily M. Hill Source Type: news

A special invitation to authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact one of the Editors with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission: (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - September 7, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Clinical Impact of Multiplex Syndromic Panels in the Diagnosis of Bloodstream, Gastrointestinal, Respiratory, and Central Nervous System Infections
Recent technological advances are revolutionizing clinical microbiology. In place of the traditional diagnostic approach in which a clinician suspecting an infectious disease is required to test for the most likely etiology, perform follow-up testing for rarer causes, and then perhaps be left with a diagnosis of exclusion, many laboratories are now offering multiplex syndromic panels to provide a comprehensive diagnostic approach to bloodstream, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and central nervous system infections. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 24, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: April N. Abbott, Ferric C. Fang Source Type: news

Campylobacter fetus Pleuropneumonia and Bacteremia in an Adult Immunocompetent Patient
Campylobacter fetus is a commensal in the intestinal tract of many domestic animals but can also cause infections in animals and humans [1]. Campylobacter species usually cause acute gastrointestinal infections, with Campylobacter jejuni being the most frequent cause. C. fetus is rarely isolated and mainly causes infections in neonates, elderly persons, immunocompromised patients, and those having underlying chronic diseases [2]. Few cases of C. fetus infection in immunocompetent individuals have been reported [3,4]. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 17, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Boris Luk šić, Svjetlana Karabuva, Marina Radić, Jakica Karanović, Bruno Lukšić Source Type: news

Rapid Molecular Panels: What Is in the Best Interest of the Patient? A Review of Patient Outcome Studies for Multiplex Panels Used in Bloodstream, Respiratory, and Neurological Infections
In the clinical microbiology laboratory, the focus when choosing new tests is often on performance, turnaround time, and labor needs. This review examines available rapid, multiplexed tests from a different perspective: that of the patient. It considers whether published evidence supports the notion that use of rapid, on-demand tests (as opposed to batched testing) leads to better patient outcomes and whether broad, syndrome-based, multiplexed panels translate into better patient care than narrower monoplex or duplex assays. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 10, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Kaede V. Sullivan Source Type: news

Lactococcus garviae Prosthetic Mitral Valve Endocarditis: a Case Report and Literature Review
We report a new case of L. garviae prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis that was managed with antibiotic therapy alone. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 10, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Ewout Landeloos, Guy Van Camp, Hans De Beenhouwer Tags: Case Report Source Type: news

A Special Invitation to Authors
The editors of Clinical Microbiology Newsletter welcome proposals for review articles on topics relevant to clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians. If you would like to prepare a brief manuscript on such a topic, please contact Paul Granato with your proposal (see contact information and general guidelines below) to discuss the details of the potential submission. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 10, 2017 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Atopobium vaginae Bacteremia Associated with a Subchorionic Hematoma
We report a case of Atopobium vaginae and Dialister micraerophilus bacteremia in an HIV-positive pregnant woman diagnosed with a subchorionic hematoma by using a prenatal ultrasound scan. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - August 8, 2017 Category: Microbiology Authors: Hugues Jacqmin, Paul deMunter, Jan Verhaegen, Liesbeth Lewi Tags: Case Report Source Type: news