New Sleep Articles Available from May
Review the latest sleep articles available from this past month. Learn about the new medication Hetlioz and its use to treat Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder in blind people. Consider who should use it and how its effectiveness compares to melatonin. Explore Non-24 and how it causes both insomnia and daytime sleepiness. Learn about QNASL nasal spray as a treatment option for nasal allergies. Finally, examine some common questions related to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use: can you wear earplugs with it, how might it help you breathe through your nose during the day, and can it make you sick? Read More: He...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - May 31, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from April
This month brings a bouquet of articles meant to address seasonal allergies, so common as spring flowers bloom. Included in this collection are both over-the-counter and prescription options, pills and sprays that can be used to treat allergic rhinitis. Explore these options, including: Allegra, Claritin, Zyrtec, Singulair, Nasacort, Veramyst, and Zetonna. In addition, learn how a backpack might help you to prevent snoring and sleep apnea that occurs when sleeping on your back. Read More: How a Backpack Might Prevent Snoring and Sleep Apnea Over-the-Counter Allegra Medication for Allergies Over-the-Counter Claritin M...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - April 28, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

How Long Does a CPAP Prescription Last?
If you use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or bilevel to treat your sleep apnea, you may wonder: how long does a CPAP prescription last? Though the answer may vary somewhat based on your insurance, there are a few rules of thumb that can be followed. In most cases, the prescription your sleep specialist gives you for CPAP and the associated equipment will be good for 1 year from the time it is issued. This ensures that you are regularly checking in with your physician to ensure that your treatment is optimized. Your doctor can help you address any problems and update you on new masks, comfort features, or other...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 26, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Why Periodic Limb Movements Are Not Restless Legs Syndrome
This is an issue that confuses patients and sleep specialists alike: what is the difference between periodic limb movements of sleep and restless legs syndrome? And why does it matter? Movements of the legs at night can disturb sleep and lead to insomnia. However, not all movements are alike. In order to understand the difference between overlapping disorders, it is important to get back to the basics. Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a condition that leads to discomfort in the legs and may even be associated with intentional, conscious movements. It consists of four key features: An urge to move the legs, usually acco...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 22, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Sleep Apnea and the Effects on Your Health
Sleep is not always a benign state. Snoring may not be harmless. In fact, a related condition that affects breathing during sleep may have important consequences. This disorder, sleep apnea, can have significant effects on your overall health. There are certain symptoms and signs associated with obstructive sleep apnea that can affect day-to-day life. Excessive daytime sleepiness, mood complaints like anxiety or depression, or difficulty with thinking may undermine concentration or memory. However, untreated sleep apnea can have other unwanted side effects. Sleep apnea may increase blood pressure, lead to insulin resista...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 21, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Battling the Bed Bugs
It is a perennial headline that appears in the news: "Bed Bugs Are Back!" You may wonder about these little critters and why they seem to bedevil us everywhere these days. Take a moment to review some information on what bed bugs are, what harm they may (or may not) be, the symptoms associated with bed bug exposure, and the treatment options available if you face an infestation. You don't have to let these creepy, crawly nuisances bother you. Sleep tight - and don't let the bed bugs bite! Read More About Bed Bugs: What Are Bed Bugs? Symptoms and Treatments of Bed Bugs What Harm Are Bed Bugs? Follow me on&...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 20, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Fellowship Training in Sleep Medicine
What does it mean for a physician to be fellowship-trained in sleep medicine? If you are a patient, why should you care? Learn how fellowship training may enhance your experience at your next doctor's visit to treat your sleep disorder. Medical training is really confusing. Even while I was in college, working in a sleep clinic over a summer and completing applications to medical school, I didn't really understand what all the titles meant. There is a litany: intern, resident, fellow, attending, house staff, and a smattering of others. In order to sort out the vocabulary, it can be helpful to understand the typical traini...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 15, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Edition of International Classification of Sleep Disorders Available
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) has released the 3rd edition of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD-3) as an eBook in its resource library. This authoritative text is used by clinicians and researchers alike for the diagnosis and treatment of sleep disorders. The previous edition was published in 2005. It is the collective opinion of sleep experts from the AASM who determine the names, symptoms, and diagnostic features of the most common sleep problems. These disorders are divided into six broad categories that include: Insomnia Sleep-related Breathing Disorders (snoring, sleep apne...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 14, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Board-certified Sleep Specialists Provide Better Sleep Apnea Care
New research in the March 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine suggests that patients with obstructive sleep apnea who are treated by board-certified sleep specialists have improved adherence to therapy. The most common treatment of sleep apnea is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, which remains the gold standard to cure the condition. This treatment can sometimes require accommodations to make it more comfortable, however. If early interventions are not made when problems arise, patients are less likely to continue using it. The study, "A Multicenter Prospective Comparative Effectiven...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 14, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Why It's Important to Bring Your CPAP to See Your Doctor
If you use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat your sleep apnea, you are likely quite familiar with the machine and its accompanying supplies. It may have a fixed place in your home next to your bed, but why might it be important to occasionally pack it up and bring it with you to see your doctor? Whether you use CPAP, or other related treatments like bilevel, the machine is an integral part of your experience. Compliance to therapy is often dependent on having the right device, proper settings, and the related equipment to support your efforts. The supplies may include the mask interface, headgear, tubing...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 28, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Refusing Weight Checks at Your Doctor Only Harms Your Health
My office is across from the station we use in our clinic to measure vital signs. When I leave my door open, I can overhear patients interact with the medical assistant as they are checked in. I am shocked by the number of patients, usually women, who refuse to have their weight measured as part of the intake process. This may have serious consequences. As one of my professors taught us in medical school, vital signs are just that: vital. They are extremely important and each and every one can tell us much about the state of a patient's health. These vital signs include blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, blood ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 27, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Driving Under the Influence of Ambien
In the trial of Kerry Kennedy, she recently disclosed in testimony her belief that she mistakenly took Ambien instead of her thyroid medication and that his contributed to an accident in 2012 in which she swerved and hit a tractor trailer. This raises important concerns about the effects of Ambien on driving, both when taken accidentally in the day or when its effects last into the morning. Ambien is typically prescribed as a sleeping pill. It is sold under the generic name of zolpidem. It may come in an extended-release form called Ambien CR or as a lower dose to be taken in the middle of the night called Intermezzo. Onc...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 26, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Blood Test May Be Closer for Narcolepsy
Recent advances by Dr. Emmanuel Mignot's research group at Stanford University may move us closer to being able to diagnose narcolepsy with a blood test, as discussed in a recent piece on The Huffington Post.   Historically, narcolepsy has been difficult to diagnose and prior to the identification of its cause, was often dismissed as a psychiatric manifestation. The condition is relatively rare, affecting 1 in 2,000 people. It is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, hallucinations associated with sleep transitions, sleep paralysis, and often cataplexy. Cataplexy is weakness that may manifest as knee buckli...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 25, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from February
This month's articles include some important pieces on children's sleep and related testing. Review how a standard sleep study, called a polysomnogram, differs in children. On a related topic, also find out how multiple sleep latency testing (MSLT) is done in children and why. Consider 10 signs that your child may have a sleep problem. Learn how imipramine may be used to treat bedwetting in children. If you use CPAP to treat your sleep apnea, you may want to know some ways you can talk while wearing your mask. Reflect on some of the most important consequences of insomnia, a condition that plagues millions. Finally, learn ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 23, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Wired Doctors Can Improve Patient Health
You may have already noticed, but there is change afoot: your doctor is likely becoming more wired, further integrating technology and social media into the practice of medicine. How will this impact the health of patients? As a younger physician, I have grown up with the explosion of computer technology. In grade school, I played Number Munchers and Oregon Trail on the Apple IIe computers that populated the computer labs of my school and the local library. When I was 8, we got our first Zenith computer at home. It couldn't do much, really. It didn't even run Windows. It did, however, have a Lotus word processing applicat...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 22, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Lack of Federal Oversight on Supplements Endangers Lives, Wastes Money
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently announced its intent to hold a meeting in late March to discuss changes in how it regulates over-the-counter drugs. Although this could be a welcome change, it is clear that a lack of federal oversight regarding other supplements continues to endanger lives. The current review system for over-the-counter medications has been in place since 1972. It is painstakingly slow, with many products on the shelves that are still, technically, under FDA review. This process is nowhere near as strict as the guidelines and requirements in place for prescription medications. So-calle...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 21, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from January
As we welcome 2014, it is a great time to expand your knowledge of sleep apnea and the most common treatment, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Take a few minutes to learn about the anatomy associated with the incidence of sleep apnea, as well as factors that might make it worse. Discover how menopause increases the risk of sleep apnea in women. If you are using CPAP, consider what might happen if you don't use it one night. Is it possible to travel with CPAP? Finally, if you are thinking about using CPAP, you might wonder what should be done if you consistently breathe through your mouth at night. Finally, expan...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 28, 2014 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Jahi McMath Died and What Followed Has Been Tragic
This afternoon the latest chapter in the demise and subsequent saga of 13-year-old Jahi McMath has been started when a judge granted an extension of life support through Jan. 7. Since her surgery and subsequent cardiac arrest on Dec. 9, this case has become the topic of conversation throughout the nation. The unusual situation has attracted the commentary of medical providers, lawyers, ethicists, public relations agents, and religious figures. It has sparked an intense, emotional debate across water coolers and dining room tables. It deserves our considerate reflection for what it can teach us about medical science, the en...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - December 31, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from December
As we close out 2013, check out some of the latest sleep articles from December. Review what your goal apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) should be when you use CPAP or BiPAP to treat sleep apnea. If you are new to using CPAP, you may want to learn about how much you are required to use the device so that insurance will pay for it. Learn how often you should replace each of your CPAP supplies, including the mask, headgear, tubing, filters, and humidifier tank. Discover how Zzoma Positional Therapy may help to treat mild to moderate sleep apnea and snoring. Expand your vocabulary by learning the definition of glutamate. Consider so...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - December 29, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

More Extensive Sleep Apnea Surgery Revealed in Girl with Brain Death
In a court hearing Friday, further details were revealed in the case of 13-year-old Jahi McMath, the teenager who suffered complications leading to brain death after surgery to treat sleep apnea. While awaiting the opinion of an independent neurologist as ordered by the court, additional information about the procedures preceding the tragic turn of events has been disclosed. She did not have a routine tonsillectomy. Rather, she had three procedures to treat her condition: adenotonsillectomy, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP), and turbinate reduction. Tonsillectomy with or without removal of the adenoids is commonly perfor...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - December 21, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Teenage Girl Suffers Brain Death After Tonsillectomy
By now you may have heard about the unfortunate story involving a teenage girl in Oakland, Calif. who suffered brain death after a routine tonsillectomy to treat her sleep apnea. This tragic story tugs at heartstrings and may raise concerns among parents seeking treatments for their own children. First, tonsillectomy is routinely indicated for the treatment of sleep apnea in children and adolescents. When tonsils or adenoids are enlarged, these tissues can obstruct the airway. During sleep, this may lead to interruption of breathing and pauses that characterize sleep apnea. This can have serious consequences, including im...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - December 17, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from November
This month's articles include content on treatments for insomnia, including how to stop racing thoughts at night and the treatment called cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI). Consider why older people may not want to use over-the-counter sleeping pills that contain diphenhydramine. You can learn how to change filters on your CPAP machine. Discover the relationship between the sudden painless vision loss of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) and obstructive sleep apnea. If you are pondering a job change, review 10 reasons to consider a career in sleep medicine. Finally, continue to expand your vocabulary...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - November 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles from October
It was another busy month with plenty of new information available about sleep disorders. Review some of the new sleep articles available from October. Discover surprising signs of obstructive sleep apnea and insomnia, as well as indications that your continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is not working properly. Expand your vocabulary by learning about three important neurotransmitters: GABA, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Consider some reasons why you may wish to avoid using sleeping pills altogether. Finally, learn about the use of the prescription medication amantadine to treat fatigue in multiple sclerosis. Re...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - October 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Why You Don't Need Those Sleeping Pills
It's an easy trap to fall into. You have a bad night of sleep and before you know it, this stretches into a run of bad nights. You try to observe good sleep hygiene, making a few changes to make things better, but your insomnia persists. You mention it to your doctor and you receive a prescription for a sleeping pill. Then the real trouble begins. Sleeping pills are one of the most widely prescribed medications in the world. In a recent report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, it was estimated that between 2005 and 2010 about 4 percent of U.S. adults aged 20 and older used sleeping pills in the previous m...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - October 8, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from September
This month was an excellent opportunity to expand your knowledge of sleep and sleep disorders. Learn some new vocabulary about important structures and chemicals in the brain, including: pineal body, dopamine, serotonin, and tryptophan. Better understand the causes and treatment of CPAP-related gas and how to keep your CPAP mask on at night if you find yourself removing it unconsciously. Consider whether CPAP pressure directly correlates to the degree of sleep apnea severity and what other factors might be involved. Finally, discover 10 surprising signs of sleep apnea as it occurs in children. Read More: The Causes and...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - September 29, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Beauty Sleep? Study Suggests CPAP Therapy May Lead to More Alert, Youthful, and Attractive Appearance
This study may add to the motivation of patients to find ways to make it work for them. Follow me on Twitter or Facebook to receive notice of all the latest updates to this site.Beauty Sleep? Study Suggests CPAP Therapy May Lead to More Alert, Youthful, and Attractive Appearance originally appeared on About.com Sleep Disorders on Friday, September 13th, 2013 at 12:00:49.Permalink | Comment | Email this (Source: About Sleep Disorders)
Source: About Sleep Disorders - September 13, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from August
Explore the latest articles on sleep-related topics for August. Consider the long-term prognosis of common sleep disorders, including insomnia, restless legs syndrome (RLS), and sleep behaviors called parasomnias. Learn the definition of tachyphylaxis and tolerance and how these concepts relate to the use of sleeping pills. Moreover, what is dependence? Discover what it means to become physically and psychologically dependent on sleeping pills and which ones carry higher risks. How does the effectiveness of sleeping pills change over time? Finally, review the most common side effects associated with the use of Ambien for i...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - August 31, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from July
Check out some of the latest articles that have been published on the site in July. Learn about rapid maxillary expansion and how it might be used to treat sleep apnea in children. Review some of the most common misunderstandings about parasomnias like sleepwalking and night terrors. Better understand the meaning of apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in both adults and children. Consider the reasons why insomnia may happen and whether narcolepsy and sleep apnea ever go away. Finally, expand your sleep vocabulary and learn the definition of micrognathia. Read More: What Is Rapid Maxillary Expansion? Misunderstandings about Par...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - July 20, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from June Focus on Sleep Eating
Explore some of the latest sleep articles from June, many of which focus on sleep-related eating. Learn about night eating syndrome and what distinguishes it from sleep eating disorder. Discover the causes of sleep eating, how it is diagnosed, and the treatment options that are available. Review information about the medication Topamax, one of the treatments available for sleep eating, including the possible side effects. Finally, learn how to get used to using CPAP and how to adjust to a new time zone to avoid jet lag. Read More: What Is Night Eating Syndrome? What is the Difference Between Sleep Eating Disorder and ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - June 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

SLEEP 2013: Melatonin May Improve Sleep and Cognition at High Altitudes
According to a new study conducted at Mt. McKinley, the highest peak in North America with a summit height of 20,320 feet, melatonin may help to improve sleep and even cognition at high altitudes. The study, conducted by Christopher Jung, PhD from the University of Alaska at Anchorage, demonstrated that after taking melatonin, subjects fell asleep faster and experienced less wakefulness during the night. In addition, the average reaction times the next day were improved, as measured by the Stroop test, which could aid safety in the dangerous environment. "Many high altitude climates are extreme and dangerous, often ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - June 4, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

SLEEP 2013: Patients with Diabetes, Hypertension Must Be Evaluated for Sleep Apnea
According to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), it is recommended that anyone with diabetes or hypertension should be evaluated for sleep apnea by a board-certified sleep medicine physician. Sleep apnea consists of repeated partial or complete collapse of the airway during sleep that contributes to interrupted breathing, oxygen level drops, and fragmented sleep. The condition has been strongly linked to the incidence of both Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. "Diagnosis and treatment of sleep apnea from a board-certified sleep medicine physician will promote improvement in these conditions - includ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - June 3, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

SLEEP 2013: Sleep Deprived Men Over Perceive Women's Sexual Interest
A new study suggests that sleep deprivation among men leads to altered perceptions of women's interest and intent to have sex. This occurred after only one night of sleep deprivation. The study consisted of 60 college students who completed a questionnaire, including prompts such as: "When a woman goes out to a bar, how likely is it that she is interested in finding someone to have sex with that night?" After a night of sleep deprivation, opinions regarding sexual interest and intent were re-evaluated and the changes were noted. The authors suggest that sleep deprivation may cause problems in the frontal lobe, ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - June 3, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Latest Sleep Content Available from May
Explore some of the latest content from this past month. Learn how to sleep on a plane (and avoid snoring). If you have restless legs syndrome (RLS), you may want to review ways to improve your symptoms on a long flight. Consider some of the most common side effects with the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and an oral appliance to treat sleep apnea. Expand your vocabulary by learning the definitions of mandible and maxilla. Finally, read about the use of Klonopin to treat parasomnias, including sleepwalking and REM behavior disorder. These great articles will add to your knowledge of sleep and sleep disor...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - May 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Sleep 2013 Set to Get Underway in Baltimore
In just a few days, the national meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies - known as SLEEP 2013 - gets underway in Baltimore, Maryland. This promises to be an exciting time with education, new research revelations, and the unveiling of the latest sleep-related products. This 27th annual meeting is a joint affair between the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Sleep Research Society. There will be two keynote addresses. Gary Gibbons, M.D. will speak on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and advances in sleep research as well as future opportunities. Thomas Roth, Ph.D. will speak on the evolution o...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - May 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from April
Explore the latest in new sleep articles available from April. Learn how simple breathing exercises may help you to ease anxiety and improve your insomnia. Discover some of the serious consequences associated with sleep problems in pregnancy, including preeclampsia and gestational diabetes. What is ZzzQuil? Learn about this over-the-counter sleeping medication and how long it should be used to treat acute insomnia. Read about the Neupro patch, a medication that is delivered through the skin to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson's disease. Finally, add to your understanding of nasal sprays that can be used to ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - April 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Latest Sleep Articles Available from March
Explore the latest sleep articles published in March. You can learn ways to decrease your anxiety and relieve insomnia. Consider how to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS) with iron supplements. Finally discover why you feel so sleepy after lunch (hint: it's not the food). Review a detailed article describing how you can sleep better at night. Expand your understanding of anatomy by learning about adenoids, turbinates, and the nasal septum. Finally, read about the use of Flonase nasal spray to treat your allergies. There is always something new to learn about in the world of sleep! Read More: Ways to Decrease Anxiety an...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Provent Files for Bankrupty, Product Remains Available While Awaiting Acquisition
As an update to a prior blog on the availability of the Provent medical device, I had a chance to speak with Matt Williams who serves as the director of national sales for Ventus Medical, Inc. based in San Jose, California. As previously reported, the company has initiated a bankruptcy process. Fortunately, they remain in operation while awaiting acquisition of their assets by another company. It is anticipated that the assets will be bought out and that business will continue with the Provent product, according to Mr. Williams. For patients who currently use or who have an interest in using the Provent medical device, i...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 25, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Sleep Apnea Treatment Provent Reportedly Goes Out of Business
For those who have sought treatment of obstructive sleep apnea with the Provent medical device, it seems that this therapy option will no longer be available as the company in San Jose, California has reportedly gone out of business, according to those familiar with its operations. Provent consists of a small one-way valve that is secured at the nostril with an adhesive band. It allows a person to breathe in, but the valve closes with exhalation and retains some of the air. Gradually, pressure builds up within the airway. It was theorized that this would keep the airway from collapsing and prevent obstructive sleep apnea....
Source: About Sleep Disorders - March 22, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

Explore New Articles on Sleep from February
There has been an exciting new development in February: I am pleased to welcome and announce the contributions of a leading expert in surgeries to treat sleep apnea and snoring, Dr. Eric Kezirian. Highly regarded for his important work in this field, he will serve as a guest author and provide valuable insight and information for people interested in learning about the surgical options to improve sleep-disordered breathing. This month includes some of his initial articles on soft palate, tongue, and jaw surgery. In addition, there is an accompanying complement of anatomy terms that are integral to understanding the procedu...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - February 28, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

New Sleep Articles Available from January
There are many great new articles available from January. The largest is an extensive series of blogs that will give specific advice to help you to sleep better over the course of 30 days. This course can be a major pathway to finally ridding yourself of your sleep problem. You can also learn what may be causing you to wake up early in the morning. If you use continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) to treat your sleep apnea, you may question whether you should use it when you have a cold. You can also learn how to avoid getting water in the tubing of your CPAP. Expand your vocabulary by learning some new words related t...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 31, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: See a Sleep Doctor
At the conclusion of 30 days spent in an effort to sleep better, you may find yourself continuing to struggle. Through no fault of your own, restorative rest may still elude you. You may still struggle to sleep at night or wake feeling unrefreshed. What should you do now to improve your sleep? When should you see a sleep doctor? There are many things that you can do to improve your sleep. As observed over the past month, you can sleep better by keeping a regular sleep schedule. You can improve your sleep environment by removing electronics, pets, and even the alarm clock. You can meet your sleep needs, pay off your sleep ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 30, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Make Sleep a Priority
As the "30 Days to Better Sleep" blog series draws to a close, there are only a few finishing touches necessary to ensure a good night's sleep. One of the most important is completely within your control: it is the decision to make sleep a priority. Sleep concludes our day. It is, quite literally, the last thing we get to, but it is a finish line that we tend to postpone when necessity or preference dictates. Work, family obligations, and hobbies may intrude on the amount of sleep that we obtain. A late night with friends, a few hours surfing the internet or watching a movie, a project for work; there are endles...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 29, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Consider If You Are Too Sleepy
In the grand scheme of improving your sleep, it is important to assess the gains and recognize if you are simply too sleepy during the day. The irony is that the sleepier you are, the less you might recognize the degree of impairment in yourself. What are the causes of persistent excessive daytime sleepiness? How might being too sleepy affect your daytime function in regards to memory, focus, and mood? Take a moment and consider whether you may still be too sleepy and why. Remember the difference between sleepiness and fatigue. Sleepiness or drowsiness is a strong compulsion to fall asleep. When it occurs during the day, ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 28, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Get Rid of the Alarm Clock
For as long as you can remember, it has been the first thing you look at in the morning: the alarm clock. It is a symbol of obligation, intrusion of responsibility, and a marker of the modern working life. One of the highlights of retirement may be finally getting rid of it. What if you could hit the snooze for good? How is an alarm clock affecting your ability to sleep and wake feeling rested? Consider whether it may be time to get rid of the alarm clock. What does it mean to use an alarm clock? At its foundation, the implication is that you need to wake up at a certain time, probably before you would naturally wake on y...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 27, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Expose Yourself to Morning Sunlight
What is the first thing you do when you wake up in the morning? Chances are that it doesn't involve getting prolonged direct exposure to sunlight. How might this undermine your ability to sleep? Learn how exposure to morning sunlight may help you to sleep better, especially if you have a circadian rhythm disorder. Light is the principal control of our day-night cycle, influencing everything from body temperature to metabolism to sleep. Without it, our bodies will run on a pattern determined by our genetics (called tau). This may not be quite 24 hours in length, and the daily discrepancy can add up. We also have natural te...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 26, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Focus on Weight Loss
Your ability to sleep well at night may be profoundly affected by being overweight or obese. The extra weight may contribute to various sleep disorders, including obstructive sleep apnea, obesity hypoventilation syndrome, and restless legs syndrome. There is a complex interplay between sleep and metabolism, and sleep deprivation may contribute to weight gain. What is the best way to lose weight? Focus on weight loss, including diet and exercise, and you may find that you are able to sleep better. The greatest concern related to being overweight or obese is the effect that this can have on breathing during sleep.  The...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 25, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Quiet Your Restless Legs
Resting at night depends on getting to sleep easily and staying asleep. Aside from insomnia, one of the sleep disorders that can make it difficult to fall asleep is restless legs syndrome (RLS). What is this condition and what are the major causes of RLS? Frequent bouts of restlessness in your legs may require treatment, so what are the options? Learning if you have RLS and finding an effective therapy will certainly help you to sleep better. Restless legs syndrome, or RLS, is a commonly experienced but infrequently discussed condition. It may affect up to 20% of adults. It typically involves an uncomfortable or disagreea...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 24, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Snoring and Sleepiness Equals Sleep Apnea
In reviewing the articles in this blog series, you may have become convinced that the only thing that affects sleep is not sleeping as part of insomnia. However, there are many other sleep disorders that can contribute to difficulty sleeping and waking refreshed. One of the major contributors to excessive sleepiness during the day is trouble breathing at night, best characterized by sleep apnea. Sleep apnea occurs when the upper airway collapses during sleep. Tissues in the airway, from the nose past the soft palate to the base of the tongue, may obstruct the flow of air. When this occurs, this obstruction may be partial ...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 23, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Address Underlying Mood Disorders Including Anxiety and Depression
Sleep walks hand in hand with mood. Anyone who has tried to go to bed upset knows that time is spent tossing and turning instead of sleeping. It is good advice to not go to bed angry, but what about other negative feelings? Mood problems such as anxiety and depression can severely affect sleep. Consider how addressing these psychiatric conditions may help you to sleep better. In order to sleep, we have to ensure that certain conditions are meant. It is a rich tapestry with the integration of distinctive elements. Some of these are physical; we have to have been awake long enough to feel sleepy, for instance. Some of these...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 22, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news

30 Days to Better Sleep: Don't Take Naps
What's the harm in taking a nap? If you have difficulty sleeping at night, you may do well to cut out napping during the day. How do you know if your nap is harming your ability to sleep? There are plenty of people who can get by taking a nap during the day with no ill effects on that night's sleep. Unfortunately, there are others who will struggle falling asleep as a result. The ability to sleep is dependent on two factors: homeostatic sleep drive and circadian rhythm. Sleep drive builds throughout the day: the longer you stay awake, the stronger the desire to sleep. It is similar to hunger and the desire to eat: the lon...
Source: About Sleep Disorders - January 21, 2013 Category: Sleep Medicine Source Type: news