Measures of personal social capital over time: A path analysis assessing longitudinal associations among cognitive, structural, and network elements of social capital in women and men separately
Publication date: Available online 18 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Spencer Moore, Richard M. CarpianoAbstractStudies on personal social capital and health have relied on several key measures of social capital – trust, participation, network capital – all with the aim of capturing the resources to which individuals or groups might have access through their social networks. As this work has evolved, researchers have sought to differentiate among key measures, often arguing that each represents a different type of social capital. Despite the importance of this work, few studies have...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 18, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Embodiment and the foundation of biographical disruption
Publication date: Available online 16 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Athena EngmanAbstractThe concept of biographical disruption has now enjoyed nearly 40 years of use in medical sociology. This paper argues that taking an embodied approach to biographical disruption helps to explain the concept's enduring efficacy. Drawing on the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and contemporary theories of embodiment inspired by his phenomenology, this paper advances that biographical disruption involves, in the first instance, a disruption to the ability to enact an embodied orientation towards the world. Biog...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Health literacy as a social practice: Social and empirical dimensions of knowledge on health and healthcare
Publication date: Available online 16 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Silja SamerskiAbstractHealth literacy has become a hot topic in health research and public health promotion. Most definitions specify health literacy as an individual cognitive skill, and surveys such as the EU-HLS which ask people to self-rate their decision-making capacity in the health system, grade a majority of the population as having an inadequate health literacy. Inspired by a praxeological understanding of knowledge and based on an empirical study on welfare bricolage in superdiverse urban neighborhoods, this paper e...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

All in the mind? Estimating the effect of mental health on health behaviours
ConclusionsGiven the substantial burden of disease associated with unhealthy behaviours, further research examining potential causal pathways from mental health to health behaviours should be a priority, as there is the potential to reduce health burden through mental health improvements. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Sugar-sweetened beverage price elasticities in a hypothetical convenience store
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Miranda R. Blake, Emily Lancsar, Anna Peeters, Kathryn BackholerAbstractAn increase in sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) prices has been suggested to reduce SSB intake to improve population health. Using a discrete choice experiment, we tested the effect of price changes on beverage choices in an online hypothetical convenience store setting amongst 1,008 Australian adults in May to June 2016. From this we calculated pre-packaged beverage price elasticities overall and for health policy-target consumer subgroups; and identified ...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 16, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Government of Malawi's unconditional cash transfer improves youth mental health
Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Gustavo Angeles, Jacobus de Hoop, Sudhanshu Handa, Kelly Kilburn, Annamaria Milazzo, Amber Peterman, Sara Abdoulayi, Gustavo Angeles, Clare Barrington, Kristen Brugh, Sudhanshu Handa, Kelly Kilburn, Adria Molotsky, Frank Otchere, Susannah Zietz, Peter Mvula, Maxton Tsoka, Jacobus de Hoop, Tia Palermo, Amber PetermanAbstractWe explore the impacts of Malawi's national unconditional cash transfer program targeting ultra-poor households on youth mental health. Experimental findings show that the program significantly improved men...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 15, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Reports of rationing from the neglected realm of capital investment: Responses to resource constraint in the English National Health Service
This study explores the constraints on the allocation of capital budgets in health care, before addressing the question: what is the role of priority setting and rationing in responses to these constraints? The paper presents findings from interviews conducted with senior finance professionals in 30 National Health Service local provider organisations across England. Findings suggest a pervasive sense of impending crisis, with capital restrictions limiting investment in buildings, infrastructure and equipment. The paper applies a conceptual classification scheme from the classic rationing literature (the forms of rationing...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Negotiating jurisdictional boundaries in response to new genetic possibilities in breast cancer care: The creation of an ‘oncogenetic taskscape’
Publication date: Available online 13 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Sarah Wright, Mary Porteous, Diane Stirling, Oliver Young, Charlie Gourley, Nina HallowellAbstractChanges in the nature and structure of healthcare pathways have implications for healthcare professionals' jurisdictional boundaries. The introduction of treatment focused BRCA1 and 2 genetic testing (TFGT) for newly diagnosed patients with breast cancer offers a contemporary example of pathway change brought about by technological advancements in gene testing and clinical evidence, and reflects the cultural shift towards genomic...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Preventing adverse information effects on health outcomes: A self-affirmation intervention reduced information-induced cognitive decline in gastrointestinal cancer patients
ConclusionsNocebo effects may be reduced by allowing patients the opportunity to restore their self-integrity at the implicit level. Self-affirmation has the potential to reduce AIE in patient populations without withholding relevant information about potential treatment side effects. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 14, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Secondary effects of myPlaybook on college athletes’ avoidance of drinking games or pregaming as a protective behavior strategy: A multisite randomized controlled study
ConclusionsFindings from the present study as well as other research suggest that general alcohol-focused interventions may not have secondary effects on reducing students’ participation in drinking games and pregaming and as such, more specific targeted interventions should be investigated. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Peer worker involvement in low-threshold supervised consumption facilities in the context of an overdose epidemic in Vancouver, Canada
Publication date: Available online 10 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Mary Clare Kennedy, Jade Boyd, Samara Mayer, Alexandra Collins, Thomas Kerr, Ryan McNeilAbstractOverdose prevention sites (OPS) are a form of supervised consumption facility that have been implemented in Vancouver, Canada as an innovative response to an ongoing overdose epidemic. OPS are primarily staffed by peers – people who use(d) drugs (PWUD) – trained in overdose response. We sought to characterize peer worker involvement in OPS programming, including how this shapes service dynamics and health outcomes among...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Powerful audiences are linked to health information avoidance
ConclusionsFindings demonstrate that people are concerned with audience perceptions of their health and these concerns may adversely affect decision making and behavior. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Implementation and effectiveness of free health insurance for the poor pregnant women in Tanzania: A mixed methods evaluation
This study used a mixed methods evaluation to determine the effect of a targeted health insurance scheme on access to affordable quality maternal and child care, and assess implementation fidelity and how this affected programme outcomes.Programme effects on service access, affordability and quality were evaluated using difference in difference regression analysis, with outcomes being measured through facility, patient and household surveys and observations of care before the intervention started and eighteen months later. A simultaneous process evaluation was designed as a case study of the implementation experience. A to...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Clustered risk: An ecological understanding of sexual activity among adolescent boys and girls in two urban slums in Monrovia, Liberia
This study examines the intersection of psychosocial and interpersonal factors with the social and physical environment to form an ecological understanding of how the determinants that shape sexual activity differ between boys and girls in two urban slums in Monrovia, Liberia. This study focuses on three different levels: 1) intrapersonal and psychosocial factors, 2) the role of the family and other interpersonal relationships, and 3) the overall community structure.Fifty-three adolescents aged 15–17 years (27 males and 26 females) were recruited to participate in a concept mapping exercise. Concept mapping is a part...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 9, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Maternal employment and child health in Nepal: The importance of job type and timing across the child's first five years
Publication date: Available online 6 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Sarah Brauner-Otto, Sarah Baird, Dirgha GhimireAbstractThe increase in female labor force participation (FLFP) in the paid labor market since the mid-1900s is one of the most pronounced family transitions and increasingly a global phenomenon. While this may improve income and bargaining power of the women, it may also increase stress and decrease time with children. Using the Chitwan Valley Family Study in Nepal, we explore the consequences of this transition for children's health by combining newly collected data on child hea...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The hidden cost of informal care: An empirical study on female caregivers' subjective well-being
Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Lu Chen, Hongli Fan, Lanlan ChuAbstractUsing data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), this study investigated the impact of informal care on female caregivers' subjective well-being in China. We found that informal care significantly reduced the subjective well-being of female caregivers using the instrumental variable (IV) ordered probit model. Our results revealed that the care effect on subjective well-being was more significant for rural caregivers than for urban caregivers. The more hours or more recipients...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The ‘double precarity’ of employment insecurity and unaffordable housing and its impact on mental health
Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Rebecca Bentley, Emma Baker, Zoe AitkenAbstractThis paper describes who is most likely to experience household employment insecurity and housing affordability stress – double precarity – and estimates the degree to which housing affordability mediates the effect of employment insecurity on mental health.We use a cohort of 24,201 participants in 2016 Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey (6.2 repeated measures on average). We estimate the likelihood of onset of household employment insecurity, ho...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Unconditional cash transfers and parental obesity
In this study, we evaluate the impact of unconditional family cash transfers on the body mass index (BMI) and obesity of parents. Our approach is based on the implementation of the Universal Child Care Benefit in 2006 for all children in Canada under 6 years of age. We show that the reform caused decreases in BMI and the prevalence of overweight and obesity in mothers with young children. We also report larger changes at the upper tail of the distribution of BMI in both lower-educated mothers and single mothers. In terms of fathers, we find that the policy had no impact on weight outcomes. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Economic conditions at birth and cardiovascular disease risk in adulthood: Evidence from post-1950 cohorts
Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Rob J.M. Alessie, Viola Angelini, Gerard J. van den Berg, Jochen O. Mierau, Laura VilumaAbstractMuch of the literature that studies long-run effects of early-life economic conditions on health outcomes is based on pre-1940 birth cohorts. Early in these individuals’ lives, public social safety nets were at best rudimentary, and female labor force participation was relatively low. We complement the evidence by studying the effects of regional business cycle variations in the post-1950 Netherlands on cardiovascular disease ...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The disciplining of self-help: Doing self-help the Norwegian way
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): M. Hedlund, B.J. Landstad, J.Q. TritterAbstractWe explore how Norwegian self-help groups are defined and managed to create a particular form of health system governmentality. Self-help groups are typically framed as therapeutic communities where participants define the agenda creating a space where open and equal interaction can produce individual learning and personal growth. In Norway, however, self-help groups are managed in a way that integrates them in to the health system but insulates them from clinical medicine; an app...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Income-related inequality and inequity in children’s health care: A longitudinal analysis using data from Brazil
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Anderson Moreira Aristides dos Santos, Julian Perelman, Paulo de Andrade Jacinto, César Augusto Oviedo Tejada, Aluísio J.D. Barros, Andréa D. Bertoldi, Alicia Matijasevich, Iná S. SantosAbstractThe Brazilian Unified Health System was created in the late 1980s to ensure free universal access to health care and was funded by taxes and social contributions. The persistent inequity in access to health services in favour of richer individuals in Brazil has been observed in the literature. However, to the...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

20 Years in the world of work: A study of (nonstandard) occupational trajectories and health
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Francesco Giudici, Davide MorselliAbstractLongitudinal research emphasizes that nonstandard (i.e., temporary contracts, part-time and multiple jobs) and discontinuous occupational trajectories (i.e., intermittent unemployment or inactivity) are associated with lower levels of mental health. A branch of this research highlights, over many years of observation the importance of the time of exposure to nonstandard occupational trajectories as a social determinant of health. However, the timing of the observed period and the multi...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Saved by retirement: Beyond the mean effect on mental health
Publication date: Available online 4 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Ingo W.K. Kolodziej, Pilar García-GómezAbstractWe analyze the causal effect of retirement on mental health, exploiting differences in retirement eligibility ages across countries and over time using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. We estimate not only average effects, but also use distributional regression to examine whether these effects are unequally distributed across the mental health distribution. We find unequally distributed protective effects of retirement on mental health...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 5, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Perceived social support in African American breast cancer patients: Predictors and effects” [Soc. Sci. Med. 192 (2017) 134–142]
Publication date: Available online 1 February 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Tess Thompson, Maria Pérez, Matthew Kreuter, Julie Margenthaler, Graham Colditz, Donna B. Jeffe (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 2, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Children's mobility and environmental exposures in urban landscapes: A cross-sectional study of 10–11 year old Scottish children
This study developed a methodology for describing children's mobility and the complexity of their environmental exposure across a 1934 km2 study area, including urban, suburban and rural zones. It conceptualised and modelled this area as a landscape, comprised of spatially discrete amenities, infrastructure features, differing land covers/use and broader environmental contexts. The model used a 25 m2 grid system (∼3 million cells). For each cell, there was detailed built-environment information. We joined data for 100 10/11-year-old children who had worn GPS trackers to provide individual-level mobility information...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Intersectional decomposition analysis with differential exposure, effects, and construct
Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): John W. Jackson, Tyler J. VanderWeeleAbstractIn recent years a wide array of proposals for bringing intersectional perspectives into quantitative studies of health disparities have appeared, from studies of interaction, predictive discrimination, to mediation. Bauer and Scheim, in a companion set of articles, extend these proposals by developing new attribution-blind measures of perceived discrimination and using VanderWeele's 3-way decomposition to quantify its contribution to disparities through differential exposure and dif...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - February 1, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Economic development and health outcomes: Evidence from cardiovascular disease mortality in Europe
Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Jonathan Spiteri, Philip von BrockdorffAbstractThe impact of economic growth on health outcomes has generated various conflicting results in recent years, particularly with the emergence of cardiovascular disease as one of the most salient global health issues. This paper looks at the relationship between economic development and health outcomes. We first estimate an empirical model using data on annual cardiovascular disease mortality in a panel of 27 European countries, over the period 2003 to 2014, together with per capita ...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Quantifying intersectionality: An important advancement for health inequality research
ConclusionsThe pair of articles in this issue by Scheim and Bauer (2019), and Bauer and Scheim (2019), offer important new data collection instruments and data analytic strategies to advance our ability to measure discrimination intersectionally. When using these new tools, it is important to not lose track of the origins and historical underpinnings of intersectionality and to focus on the transformative goal of intersectionality to eradicate inequality. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Effect of physicians' knowledge on antibiotics rational use in China's county hospitals
ConclusionResults confirmed that physicians' knowledge significantly influences rational antibiotic use. Targeted training programs to promote physicians’ knowledge of antibiotic especially at county hospitals in the western regions of China are urgently needed. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Out-of-pocket expenditure and correlates of caesarean births in public and private health centres in India
Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Sanjay K. Mohanty, Basant K. Panda, Pijush Kanti Khan, Priyamadhaba BeheraAbstractIncreasing caesarean births is a global trends and of recent origin in India. Besides its utility and disutility, increasing caesarean births exerts higher economic burden on households and the nation. Using 148,746 births from the National Family Health Survey, 2015–16, this paper examines the correlates and provides comparable estimates of out of pocket expenditure (OOPE) on caesarean births in public and private health centres in India. ...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 31, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Multi-contextual influences on adolescent pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections in the United States
ConclusionAdolescent individual beliefs emerged as the most salient predictors of both pregnancies and STIs. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Do children's food choices go with the crowd? Effects of majority and minority peer cues shown within an audiovisual cartoon on children's healthy food choice
ConclusionsThis study has provided some indications into how healthy food presentations within an audiovisual stimulus can influence children's food choice. Prompting children's healthy eating behaviors by presenting healthy foods in media content is not as easy as prompting unhealthy food choices by presenting unhealthy foods. Children's natural preference for fruit is attenuated by peer cues shown in media when a peer is in a minority. Overall, content producers should be aware of the risks of minority peer cues. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Accepters, fence sitters, or rejecters: Moral profiles of vaccination attitudes
ConclusionGiven the sensitivity of fence sitters and rejecters to liberty-related moral concerns, our research cautions against the use of adversarial approaches—e.g., No Jab, No Pay legislation—that promote vaccination uptake by restricting parental freedoms, as they may backfire amongst parents ambivalent toward vaccination. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Suffering and response: Directions in empirical research
Discussion is given to the concept of suffering itself; existing empirical measures are reviewed and critiqued and a new multi-item measure of suffering, for use in both clinical and non-clinical populations, is put forward. The existing empirical research on suffering is briefly reviewed with considerable discussion given to potential future research directions on understanding the distribution and determinants of suffering, potential responses to suffering and their effectiveness, and the role of caregiving in the alleviation of suffering. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Does eating fruit and vegetables also reduce the longitudinal risk of depression and anxiety? A commentary on 'Lettuce be happy'
Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Redzo Mujcic, Andrew J. OswaldAbstractThis commentary provides evidence of a longitudinal connection between current diet and later mental health. We build upon a research study, Ocean, Howley, and Ensor (2019, forthcoming), which uses UK data to argue that consumption of fruit and vegetables may be able to improve people's self-assessed mental-health scores on the general health questionnaire (GHQ) and life-satisfaction scores. We show, in Australian data, that an equivalent result may be true for actual clinical diagnosis of...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 30, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The promise and pitfalls of intersectional scale development
Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Catherine E. Harnois, João L. Bastos (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 29, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Patient choice and provider competition – Quality enhancing drivers in primary care?
Publication date: Available online 29 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Sofie Vengberg, Mio Fredriksson, Ulrika WinbladAbstractPatient choice of provider and provider competition have been introduced with the claim that they would lead to improved quality. For this to occur, certain conditions must be fulfilled on both the demand and the supply side. However, supply side-mechanisms – with provider behaviour as central – have been largely neglected in the literature, especially in primary care markets. In this article, we focus on provider behaviour and explore if and how choice and com...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 29, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Contributions of personality to social influence: Contingent associations between social network body size composition and BMI
Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Brea L. Perry, Gabriele CiciurkaiteAbstractSocial influence is a key determinant of health behaviors and outcomes. Research in the social network tradition emphasizes social structural mechanisms like network content (i.e., the degree to which particular attitudes, attributes, or behaviors are present in the network) and social proximity (i.e., opportunities for social interaction). In contrast, psychologists are oriented toward the individual, identifying how personality traits like self-monitoring affect susceptibility to pe...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The global diabetes epidemic and the nonprofit state corporate complex: Equity implications of discourses, research agendas, and policy recommendations of diabetes nonprofit organizations
Publication date: Available online 23 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Claudia Chaufan, Daniel SalibaAbstractImportant insights have been gained from studying how corporate social actors -- such as Big Tobacco or Big Food -- influence how global health issues are framed, debated, and addressed, and in so doing contribute to reproducing health inequities. Less attention has been paid to the role of nonprofit organizations (NPOs), even when all too often NPOs actively contribute to these inequities through normalizing discourses and practices that legitimize establishment views, poor public policie...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

How to be a very safe maternity unit: An ethnographic study
This study enhances understanding of what makes a maternity unit safe, paving the way for better design of improvement approaches. It also advances the debate on quality and safety improvement by offering a theoretically and empirically grounded analysis of the interplay between interventions and context of implementation. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Informal caregiving and mortality―Who is protected and who is not? A prospective cohort study from Japan
In conclusion, informal caregiving did not increase mortality as a whole, nor for most subgroups, while some sub-groups such as women in the lower socioeconomic status groups may be vulnerable to the adverse health effects of caregiving. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The body language of place: A new method for mapping intergenerational “geographies of embodiment” in place-health research
Publication date: Available online 21 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Ryan J. Petteway, Mahasin Mujahid, Amani Nuru-Jeter, Rachel Morello-FroschAbstractResearch on place and health has grown rapidly in recent years, including examining the physiological embodiment of place-based exposures. While this research continues to improve understanding of why place matters, there is particular need for work capable of revealing: 1) which places matter, i.e. spatially-specific notions of “place”); 2) how these places matter—processes and mechanisms of the physiological embodiment of plac...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Benefits and risks of suicide disclosure
Conclusion: While the study methodology did not allow for an exploration of which benefits or risks may be most salient for suicide attempt survivors, this study lays groundwork for future research on disclosure of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Furthermore, these results can be used by service providers to support suicide attempt survivors in strategic disclosure decisions that maximize benefits and reduce risks. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Coercion and power in psychiatry: A qualitative study with ex-patients
ConclusionsTo understand the relational quality of coercion, interventions like seclusion and house rules should also be understood within this structure of de-subjectivation. We need to tackle this dynamic if we want to reduce coercion in psychiatric care. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 22, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Methods for analytic intercategorical intersectionality in quantitative research: Discrimination as a mediator of health inequalities
We describe actual and adjusted intersectional inequalities in psychological distress and decompose them to identify three component effects for each of 11 intersectional comparison groups (e.g., Indigenous SGM), versus the reference intersectional group that experienced the lowest levels of discrimination (white non-SGM). These reflect the expected inequality in outcome: 1) due to membership in the more discriminated-against group, if its members had experienced the same lower levels of discrimination as the reference intersection; 2) due to unequal levels of discrimination; and 3), due to unequal effects of discriminatio...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

The Intersectional Discrimination Index: Development and validation of measures of self-reported enacted and anticipated discrimination for intercategorical analysis
Publication date: Available online 21 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Ayden I. Scheim, Greta R. BauerAbstractBackground and objectiveAlthough intersectional approaches have gained traction in population health research, quantitative discrimination and health studies have tended to focus on a single axis of discrimination (e.g., racism, homophobia). As few discrimination measures function across multiple social identities or positions, we developed the Intersectional Discrimination Index (InDI) for intercategorical intersectionality research, including measures of Anticipated (InDI-A), Day-to-Day...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Political parties and mortality: The role of social status and personal responsibility
Publication date: Available online 21 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Viji Diane Kannan, Theodore M. Brown, Stephen J. Kunitz, Benjamin P. ChapmanAbstractPrevious research findings across a variety of nations show that affiliation with the conservative party is associated with greater longevity; however, it is thus far unclear what characteristics contribute to this relationship. We examine the political party/mortality relationship in the United States context. The goal of this paper is two-fold: first, we seek to replicate the mortality difference between Republicans and Democrats in two sampl...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Modeling the intersectionality of processes in the social production of health inequalities
ConclusionsWhether a study is descriptive or analytic, engagement with theory is essential in order to maintain the critical and transformative edge of intersectionality. Theories of population health such as fundamental causes, social production, and ecosocial theory, should be framed and applied in explicitly intersectional terms. As the field moves toward intersectional evaluations of social processes, attention should be given to all ecological levels but especially the structural/institutional level. This attention includes considering interactions between intersectional social strata and contexts and considering the ...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Parental concern about concussion risk for their children
ConclusionsMany parents are worried about concussion, and this worry is greatest among the most socioeconomically disadvantaged parents. Further research is needed to determine the cause of this difference. Such work can identify whether there are appropriate individual or community-level targets for intervention to improve the ability of parents to understand and address the potential threat of concussion to their child. (Source: Social Science and Medicine)
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 21, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research

Conceptualizations of climate-related health risks among health experts and the public in Ghana
Publication date: Available online 18 January 2019Source: Social Science & MedicineAuthor(s): Lucia Kafui Hussey, Godwin Arku
AbstractOne major area that has gathered public attention in relation to climate change is health risks. Studies into risk perceptions have acknowledged differences between public and expert knowledge. What is less known is how perceptions of climate change related health risk vary between the public and health experts and how these differentiated perceptions are shaped and modified by everyday complex climate change narratives from multiple actors, and contextual ecologies of social and physi...
Source: Social Science and Medicine - January 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research