[Perspectives] A literary pain scale
As an English professor, I often teach classes that examine how medical institutions, medical science, and medical practitioners appear in literature. Again and again, as students read plays, novels, non-fiction, and essays, they take note of the language gap between physicians and patients —the gap in how doctors discuss disease or disorder and how patients represent the experience of illness. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Ann Jurecic Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Doctors disagree with proposed medical bill in India
A controversial bill to reform medical education in India, the National Medical Commission bill, prompted doctors to call for a nationwide strike. Patralekha Chatterjee reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Patralekha Chatterjee Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Iranian protests and Rouhanicare
Iranians have risen up to protest economic and job instability. How is President Hassan Rouhani's once popular health-care project, the so-called Rouhanicare, fairing? Sharmila Devi reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sharmila Devi Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Malaysia: a refugee conundrum
Malaysia is home to hundreds of thousands of registered and unregistered refugees, most of whom are Rohingya, but it does not recognise the refugee status. Adam Bemma reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Adam Bemma Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: Time to act on minimum unit pricing of alcohol
On Jan 22, the UK's House of Commons Health Select Committee, together with the Home Affairs Committee, will hold one of the most important meetings in the recent domestic political history of public health —on minimum unit pricing of alcohol. Chaired by independent-minded Conservative Member of Parliament and former general practitioner, Sarah Wollaston, the committee will review evidence for and against minimum unit pricing at a moment when liver disease is on a trajectory to become the biggest cau se of death in England and Wales. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Chronic liver disease: scavenger hunt for novel therapies
Chronic liver disease (CLD) is a major cause of global mortality and morbidity. However, therapeutic breakthroughs have been made in the field of viral hepatitis, with the development of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) to treat hepatitis C virus infection.1 Despite this breakthrough, the incidence of liver disease continues to rise, driven in particular by the increase in obesity-related fatty-liver disease and the consequences of excess alcohol consumption.2 Patients with CLD are at an increased risk of developing progressive liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and liver failure. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Daniel A Patten, Shishir Shetty Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Scaling up integration of health services
Almost 40 years after the Alma-Ata Declaration1 championed a comprehensive vision of health service delivery (panel), the movement towards universal health coverage (UHC) has seen the global health policy pendulum swing back towards the need for integrated people-centred health systems.2 –4 For UHC to be sustainable, resources cannot be wasted on services that are inaccessible, fragmented, and of poor quality. There is a growing need to increase the responsiveness and efficiency of service delivery and to put the needs of people and communities back at the centre of health systems . (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Erin K Ferenchick, Kumanan Rasanathan, Nuria Toro Polanco, Olga Bornemisza, Edward Kelley, Viviana Mangiaterra Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Oral fexinidazole for human African trypanosomiasis
Human African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense (g-HAT) is transmitted to human beings by tsetse flies in western and central Africa. Human beings are the only significant reservoir of the protozoan parasite, and disease control is focused on the detection and treatment of infected individuals, with or without vector control. Screening for cases can be passive (individuals are examined at fixed centres) or active (mobile teams travel to villages). The card agglutination test for trypanosomiasis and recently developed rapid diagnostic tests are the serological methods used for screening. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Fran çois Chappuis Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Sanctioning the most vulnerable —a failed foreign policy
Over past months, US-led threats of, or implementation of, economic sanctions have multiplied. On Jan 4, the USA suspended assistance to Pakistan until it takes “decisive action” against Afghan Taliban and the Haqqani network militant groups. From Jan 2, President Donald Trump indicated he would pull funding for the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees saying Palestinians were “no longer willing to talk peace”. This followed the adoptio n by the UN security council, in December, 2017, of draconian US-drafted sanctions on North Korea in response to a ballistic missile test. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] A new vaccine for typhoid control
Last week, WHO announced prequalification of the first conjugate vaccine to prevent typhoid (Typbar TCV, manufactured by Bharat Biotech, India) after the publication of randomised controlled trials, including that by Celina Jin and colleagues in The Lancet on Sept 28, 2017. WHO has decided that Typbar TCV was successfully assessed for quality, safety, and efficacy, and it is now approved for distribution by UN agencies. Already in use in India and Nepal in babies older than 6 months, the vaccine is to be licensed for use in infants younger than 2 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Children and social media
Social media is an increasingly common and integral part of people's lives, including those of children, despite a minimum access age of 13 years for some platforms. The reach of social media has outpaced research into potential benefits and harms for younger users. To address this gap, the Children's Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, published Life in ‘likes’ on Jan 4, to explore the social media experience of children aged 8–12 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Department of Error] Department of Error
Discussion. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Department of Error Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Hypothyroidism and hypertension: fact or myth? – Authors' reply
We thank Louis Hofstetter and Franz H Messerli for their interest in our Seminar on hypothyroidism in The Lancet.1 We agree that hypothyroidism is rarely the sole underlying cause of hypertension in the general population and that hypertension should always be treated in the context of primary cardiovascular disease prevention. However, several observational studies have shown a difference in blood pressure between those with hypothyroidism (clinical or subclinical) and euthyroid individuals, even after adjusting for age. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Layal Chaker, Antonio C Bianco, Jacqueline Jonklaas, Robin P Peeters Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Hypothyroidism and hypertension: fact or myth?
We read with interest the thorough Seminar on hypothyroidism (Sept 23, 2017, p 1550),1 in which the authors implicate that hypothyroidism is a cause of hypertension. However, hypertension is not a typical sign of hypothyroidism. This misconception is more than 80 years old with Owen Thompson and colleagues2 reporting a high incidence of hypertension in myxoedema. Since then, many uncontrolled observational studies have shown that elevated blood pressure in patients with hypothyroidism returns to within normal range after thyroid hormone substitution. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Louis Hofstetter, Franz H Messerli Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] How does azithromycin improve asthma exacerbations? – Author's reply
Two key findings of the AMAZES trial1 are relevant to asthma management. First, the addition of low-dose azithromycin to a combination of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting bronchodilators led to a clinically significant reduction in asthma exacerbations in adults with poorly controlled asthma. This finding provides an additional therapeutic option for these patients. Second, the effect occurred equally in both eosinophilic and non-eosinophilic asthma, by an as yet unidentified mechanism, but acting on pathways other than type 2 inflammation. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Peter G Gibson Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] How does azithromycin improve asthma exacerbations?
We read with interest the Article by Peter G Gibson and colleagues (July 4, 2017, p 659),1 which clearly showed the beneficial effects of macrolide therapy on the incidence of asthma exacerbations. Increasingly, asthma is recognised as a heterogeneous disease with multiple phenotypes and endotypes. By contrast with the effects of anti-inflammatory treatment with inhaled corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, and biological therapies —for which therapeutic efficacy depends on the inflammatory profile—Gibson and colleagues showed no differential benefit in terms of eosinophilic inflammation over non-e...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michael G Crooks, Shoaib Faruqi, Alyn H Morice Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Targeted radiotherapy for early breast cancer – Authors' reply
We reject the inference of a survival benefit for patients receiving partial-breast irradiation within the IMPORT LOW trial and caution against any such interpretation when the number of events reported is so small.1 There is no suggestion of a difference in disease-free and overall survival across IMPORT LOW treatment groups.1 The TARGIT trialists' claim of survival benefit in their own trial relates to non-breast cancer deaths, and the data they cite are from a selected subset of patients. In IMPORT LOW, there were nine cardiac deaths occurring 6 –36 months following randomisation, four after left-sided and five af...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Charlotte E Coles, Joanne S Haviland, Anna M Kirby, Jenny Titley, Maggie Wilcox, Judith M Bliss, John R Yarnold Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Targeted radiotherapy for early breast cancer
We congratulate Charlotte E Coles and colleagues (Sept 9, 2017, p 1048)1 on their randomised trial (IMPORT LOW) ratifying partial-breast irradiation and confirming the original hypothesis2 proposed in The Lancet 20 years ago.3 In 2010, the independent commentary accompanying the first results of the TARGIT-A trial4 of single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT-IORT), published in The Lancet by the authors of this letter, presented partial-breast irradiation as the new standard for suitable patients. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Jayant S Vaidya, Max Bulsara, Frederik Wenz, Jeffrey S Tobias, David Joseph, Michael Baum Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Reducing childhood obesity in the UK and France
The Lancet's Editorial (Aug 26, 2017, p 822)1 suggested that the UK's plan for reducing childhood obesity was inadequate as Public Health England announced it will be “working closely” with the food industry in seeking voluntary calorie reductions in high-energy food sources popular with children and young people. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alain Braillon Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Reducing childhood obesity in the UK
The Lancet's Editorial (Aug 26, 2017, p 882)1 is right about childhood obesity remaining an urgent public health challenge. Unfortunately, there is a certain naivety to The Lancet's view of Public Health England's (PHE) role in policy development. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Duncan Selbie Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] WHO washes its hands of older people
Older people ( ≥60 years) constitute more than 12% of the world's population, which will rise to 16·5% by 2030.1 This age group will represent 10% of the population in less developed regions by 2030. Although older people account for a greater proportion of the global burden of disease and health-care needs tha n younger people, their positive societal contribution should not be overlooked. This age group often provide unpaid care for children or grandchildren, or other adults with disabilities. Improved health of older people is an essential goal to reduce health-care costs and maintain the societal suppo rt old...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Peter Lloyd-Sherlock, Martin McKee, Shah Ebrahim Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Another perspective on the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World
Much has, and is, being said about the Foundation for a Smoke-Free World,1 an independent foundation funded by Philip Morris International, but one elemental point has been overlooked. A principal focus of the foundation, as stated on its website, is on treatment of addicted smokers to decrease mortality, including promoting the switch to reduced-risk products, such as e-cigarettes. Geoffrey Rose, in his masterful monograph The Strategy of Preventive Medicine, pointed to the so-called risk paradox, giving the example “whereby it was seen that many people exposed to a small risk may generate more disease than a few ex...
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Norbert Hirschhorn Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Obituary] Geoffrey Christopher Schild
Influenza virologist. He was born in Sheffield, UK, on Nov 28, 1935, and died in Bergen, Norway, on Aug 3, 2017, aged 81 years. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Geoff Watts Tags: Obituary Source Type: research

[Perspectives] In search of a teacher
“Written and Illustrated by…” These words were written on a blackboard in September, 1971, in crisp, authoritative chalk. We first graders at Colton Elementary School sat in awe as a young, energetic teacher took the stage in our lives. Ms Zive (and she was the first person we knew who ever us ed the term Ms) beguiled us with a dazzling smile, a secret store of Bugle corn snacks, plus the tantalising promise to let us in on the magic that adults possessed: reading. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Danielle Ofri Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[Perspectives] Using comics to change lives
Comics are a popular source of entertainment, activism, education, and subversion. Within health care the use of comics has been steadily growing for the past 50 years, with comics used to reach all age groups but particularly younger readers. I recall in the early 1980s sending a coupon I had clipped from a comic off to the Health Education Council for a smoking prevention information pack. This followed my reading about the evil Nick O Tine —overpowered by Superman (who never said yes to a cigarette) in a powerful anti-smoking story created by DC Comics. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Petra Boynton Tags: Perspectives Source Type: research

[World Report] Zimbabwe post-Mugabe era: reconstructing a health system
A once-functioning health system was weakened by Robert Mugabe's antagonistic policies. Some hope the Mnangagwa administration will bring renewal. Andrew Green reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Andrew Green Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[World Report] Syria: 7 years into a civil war
Years of conflict have killed thousands, but the toll of war on Syria's health systems extends the cost of war beyond the front lines as de-escalation efforts seem to be faltering. Sharmila Devi reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Sharmila Devi Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: From 1918 to 2018 —the lessons of influenza
Estimates of mortality during the 1918 –20 influenza pandemic range from 20 million to 100 million deaths. Mortality between countries varied enormously. A large part of this variation was related to wealth. Resource-poor countries, with weak health systems, pervasive undernutrition, and widespread poverty, had higher death rates. When 1918 mortality rates are modelled for the modern era, an epidemic of influenza with similar virulence and pathogenicity would cause around 62 million deaths, with younger age groups especially vulnerable. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] The polio endgame: securing a world free of all polioviruses
The global effort to eradicate poliomyelitis has reduced the incidence of cases caused by wild poliovirus by more than 99% since its launch in 1988, from 350  000 annual cases in 125 endemic countries to 20 cases in two countries in 2017.1 More than 16 million people who would otherwise have been paralysed by poliovirus infection are today walking, and 80%2 of the world's population lives in regions certified as polio free by WHO. Wild poliovirus now c irculates in only a few areas and remains endemic in Nigeria, Pakistan, and Afghanistan. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Michel Zaffran, Michael McGovern, Reza Hossaini, Rebecca Martin, Jay Wenger Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Renewing the focus on health care for sexually assaulted children and adolescents
Sexual assault and rape are in the media spotlight in the face of unfolding revelations of abuse of women in the entertainment industry and sports. These disclosures by public figures highlight some aspects of sexual abuse —namely, that it is often pervasive, an expression of power (rather than just about sex) and rooted in ideas of male sexual entitlement, and an experience that victims find shameful and often conceal.1,2 Far from the lights of Hollywood, many children and adolescents in low-income and middle-incom e countries (LMICs) face sexual abuse and often have little recourse to assistance. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Rachel Jewkes Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Editorial] Tuberculosis: criteria for global leadership?
Tereza Kasaeva is to be the new Director of WHO's Global Tuberculosis (TB) Programme. She joins WHO from Russia's Ministry of Health. But instead of a warm welcome, she will arrive in Geneva amid potentially disabling controversy. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] Vision quest: gene therapy for inherited vision loss
Biomedical research and clinical trials are fundamentally high-stakes endeavours, the results of which are often portrayed in hyperbolic categories. Failed phase 3 trials are called epic disappointments, while successful treatments become game changers or magic bullets. Better still, they receive US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Editorial] The NHS at 70 and Alma-Ata at 40
2018 welcomes two important anniversaries for health. In the UK, the National Health Service (NHS) will be 70 years old in July, and the global health community will mark the 40th anniversary of the Alma-Ata Declaration at a conference on Oct 25 –26 in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Common to both anniversaries will be recognition of universal health coverage (UHC) as a goal, and the place of primary health care in achieving that goal. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: The Lancet Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

[Articles] Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of dolutegravir-rilpivirine for the maintenance of virological suppression in adults with HIV-1: phase 3, randomised, non-inferiority SWORD-1 and SWORD-2 studies
Dolutegravir-rilpivirine was non-inferior to CAR over 48 weeks in participants with HIV suppression and showed a safety profile consistent with its components. Results support the use of this two-drug regimen to maintain HIV suppression. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Josep M Llibre, Chien-Ching Hung, Cynthia Brinson, Francesco Castelli, Pierre-Marie Girard, Lesley P Kahl, Elizabeth A Blair, Kostas Angelis, Brian Wynne, Kati Vandermeulen, Mark Underwood, Kim Smith, Martin Gartland, Michael Aboud Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] Combination ART: are two drugs as good as three?
The first 10 years of the development of antiretroviral therapy (ART) were characterised by a series of studies that led to the conclusion that triple therapy was the minimum required to induce and maintain full suppression of HIV replication. Early reports of using monotherapy with a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) had shown only transient decreases in p24 antigen and arrest of HIV disease progression.1 Studies of dual NRTI therapy showed more robust responses, but again these responses were temporary and unsustained in most individuals in the studies. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 5, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Mark A Boyd, David A Cooper Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Seminar] Hepatocellular carcinoma
Hepatocellular carcinoma appears frequently in patients with cirrhosis. Surveillance by biannual ultrasound is recommended for such patients because it allows diagnosis at an early stage, when effective therapies are feasible. The best candidates for resection are patients with a solitary tumour and preserved liver function. Liver transplantation benefits patients who are not good candidates for surgical resection, and the best candidates are those within Milan criteria (solitary tumour ≤5 cm or up to three nodules ≤3 cm). (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Alejandro Forner, Mar ía Reig, Jordi Bruix Tags: Seminar Source Type: research

[Articles] Perioperative patient outcomes in the African Surgical Outcomes Study: a 7-day prospective observational cohort study
Despite a low-risk profile and few postoperative complications, patients in Africa were twice as likely to die after surgery when compared with the global average for postoperative deaths. Initiatives to increase access to surgical treatments in Africa therefore should be coupled with improved surveillance for deteriorating physiology in patients who develop postoperative complications, and the resources necessary to achieve this objective. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - January 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Bruce M Biccard, Thandinkosi E Madiba, Hyla-Louise Kluyts, Dolly M Munlemvo, Farai D Madzimbamuto, Apollo Basenero, Christina S Gordon, Coulibaly Youssouf, Sylvia R Rakotoarison, Veekash Gobin, Ahmadou L Samateh, Chaibou M Sani, Akinyinka O Omigbodun, Sim Tags: Articles Source Type: research

[Comment] A snapshot of surgical outcomes and needs in Africa
It is estimated that two-thirds of the world's population do not have access to safe, affordable, and timely surgical care.1 Around 16 ·9 million people die from conditions that require surgical care each year, most of them in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs).2 In 2014, Jim Kim, President of the World Bank, challenged the global community to address this injustice, and to develop targets to measure progress on effect ive coverage of surgical interventions.3 In response, the global surgery community developed a set of core surgical indicators that measure timely access, provider density, operative volum...
Source: LANCET - January 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Anna J Dare, Bisola Onajin-Obembe, Emmanuel M Makasa Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Wakley Prize Essay] You don't know me
“You don't know who I am, do you?” (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Kate Rowland Tags: Wakley Prize Essay Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Concerns about cardiotoxicity in the HERA trial – Authors' reply
We would like to thank Antonin Levy and colleagues for their interest in our Article reporting the 11-year outcome data from the HERceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial,1 and their expressed concern that we might not have recorded all long-term cardiac consequences of treatment for early breast cancer, specifically, some that could be secondary to the use of radiotherapy. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: David A Cameron, Richard D Gelber, Marion Procter, Thomas Suter Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Concerns about cardiotoxicity in the HERA trial
In the HERceptin Adjuvant (HERA) trial (Feb 16, p 1195),1 the investigators reported that cardiac toxicity remained low in all groups and occurred mostly during the treatment phase. Cardiac assessments included repeated use of the New York Heart Association classification and left ventricular ejection fraction assessed by a cardiologist. However, the absence of information regarding radiation-related cardiac hazard might have caused misinterpretation of the data. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Antonin Levy, Cyrus Chargari, Eric Deutsch, Sofia Rivera Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Changes to NHS charges: what does this mean for our most vulnerable patients?
August, 2017, saw the introduction of new regulations on health-care charges to migrants and overseas visitors in England.1 Patients who are unable to prove entitlement to free care will receive an estimated treatment bill, which must be fully paid before receipt of care, and might increase exponentially. Urgent treatment, as defined by the treating clinician, should be provided and billed for afterwards. These regulations are the outcome of only 418 responses obtained by the Department of Health from their consultation exploring the extension of charging overseas visitors and migrants who use the National Health Service (...
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Behrouz Miguel Nezafat Maldonado, Lisa Murphy, Lucy Jones, Anna Miller, Deman Le Deaut Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] Are new technologies translatable to point-of-care testing?
The point-of-care testing (PoCT) market is rapidly expanding and its predicted worth by 2021 is US$36 ·96 billion.1 This market has many facets, one of which is tumour and cancer markers. To develop a new test for clinical use, a biomarker needs to be identified and a quick and simple detection method developed. This biomarker then goes through many steps before clinical use including the all-impor tant step—can it detect cancer earlier than existing methods? (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Danielle Bury, Pierre L Martin-Hirsch, Francis L Martin, Timothy P Dawson Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Correspondence] WHO leadership is essential for the elimination of NTDs
The second director of the Department of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs) of WHO retired at the end of September, 2017. He was appointed in 2014 to ensure administrative stability after 9 years of innovative growth of this WHO department, which was established in 2005 after the retirement of the first director.1 Sustaining the momentum for elimination of NTDs requires a timely appointment of a new director to lead an effective Department of NTDs in WHO. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Lorenzo Savioli, Denis Daumerie Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

[Highlights] Highlights 2017: health in focus
The fleeting moments captured in a photograph can tell powerful stories. Earlier this year we asked readers to send us striking pictures on any health topic for The Lancet's annual photography competition, Highlights. We were delighted by the response. Lancet editors selected these ten winning pictures from the varied and interesting photographs you sent us. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Joanna Palmer Tags: Highlights Source Type: research

[World Report] US Children's Health Insurance Program in jeopardy
Without adequate federal funding, CHIP is on the verge of collapse in several states. Susan Jaffe, The Lancet's Washington correspondent, reports. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Susan Jaffe Tags: World Report Source Type: research

[This Year in Medicine] 2017: a year in review
2017 was not only a year marred by conflict-driven humanitarian crises and political quagmires but also a year for biomedical innovation and women's empowerment. Farhat Yaqub looks back. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Farhat Yaqub Tags: This Year in Medicine Source Type: research

[Comment] Offline: Are China's global ambitions good for global health?
A bitter argument is taking place between two nations, a dispute that could have profound effects for the future of global health. China and Australia are geographic neighbours. During the past decade, both countries have worked hard to build strong trading and diplomatic relationships. They have succeeded. But those relationships are now being torn apart. China's Xinhua News Agency last week claimed that Australia's Government was “obsessed” with “criticising China”. Xinhua argued that Australia's Government was trying “to undermine bilateral political trust”. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Richard Horton Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] 2017 Wakley Prize Essay
We would like to thank the many readers who entered the 2017 Wakley Prize Essay. The winning essay published in this issue was selected by Lancet editors and is “You Don't Know Me” by Kate Rowland, an Assistant Professor at the Department of Family Medicine at Rush University, Chicago, IL, USA. Kate is board certified in family medicine and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Physicians. She's worked as a family physician for 10 years and her professional interests include understanding how doctors make decisions during patient care and learning about how new medical evidence is taken up in practice. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Joanna Palmer, Niall Boyce, Phoebe Hall, Rhiannon Howe Tags: Comment Source Type: research

[Comment] Is WHO ready to improve its country work?
The health status of people has changed dramatically across the world —in most cases for the better. People live longer and sometimes also healthier lives. In most countries, capacity to manage health issues has improved and health priorities have changed. However, WHO has not yet fully adjusted to these changing realities, but there is an opportunity now with a new Director-General and leadership team in place. (Source: LANCET)
Source: LANCET - December 22, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: Anders Nordstr öm Tags: Comment Source Type: research