Public transit use and physical activity in community-dwelling older adults: Combining GPS and accelerometry to assess transportation-related physical activity
Conclusions Active transportation, including public transit use, may contribute meaningfully to daily physical activity levels in community-dwelling older adults. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 19, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Longer or more frequent walks: Examining the relationship between transit use and active transportation in Canada
Conclusion Beyond the walks to public transit stops or stations, transit users perform more active transportation to destinations by taking more walk trips for various purposes. Developing transit infrastructure and providing proximity destinations in surrounding neighborhoods may provide health benefits beyond a reduction in travel related energy use and emissions. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 5, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Can transit-oriented developments help achieve the recommended weekly level of physical activity?
This study aims to describe travel behavior of residents in Transit-oriented developments (TODs) and its impacts on levels of physical activity through utilitarian trips (i.e., routine trips to school, work and grocery shopping). Data is drawn from a survey of residents living in seven geographically-dispersed North American TODs in 2013. Approximately 20% of survey respondents achieved weekly recommended levels of physical activity through their utilitarian trips. Trip frequency was an important factor in achieving recommended weekly physical activity levels; individuals with higher levels of public transport use were mor...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 5, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

There׳s an app for that: development of a smartphone app to promote active travel to a college campus
Conclusion: The formative research process allowed for a better understanding of the AT behavior for campus members. Feedback from the formative research allowed the developers and research team to build an app addressing the preferences of the community. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 5, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Thank you – from the prize-winning Journal of Transport and Health
Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 3, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Active commuting to school in Portuguese adolescents: Using PALMS to detect trips
Conclusion Walking to school and back home can contribute with up to 40% of recommended daily MVPA, so increasing this behavior may be of particular relevance to increase PA levels. On the other hand, cycling is underused in home-school trips and strategies to promote the use of bicycle could also be of interest, especially in trips longer than 2.0km. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 3, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Bicycling and walking in the Southeast USA: Why is it rare and risky?
Publication date: Available online 12 February 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Ariel Godwin, Anne M. Price Although the Southeast USA region of the United States has warm weather and relatively flat terrain, bicycling and walking for transportation are less prevalent in the region than in the rest of the United States. Moreover, these modes have higher rates of traffic crashes and fatalities in the Southeast USA than elsewhere. We examine factors that may contribute to this outcome, including urban sprawl, historical development patterns, policies, goals, legislation, infrastructure, and fu...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 29, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Potential health implications and health cost reductions of transit-induced physical activity
Publication date: Available online 24 February 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Ipek N. Sener, Richard J. Lee, Zachary Elgart Transit has the potential to increase an individual׳s level of physical activity due to the need to walk or bike at the beginning and end of each trip. Consideration of these health benefits would allow transit proponents to better demonstrate its true costs and benefits. In light of transit׳s potential health-related impacts, this study contributes to the growing discussion in the emerging field of health and transportation by providing a review of the current lev...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 25, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Does truck driver health and wellness deserve more attention?
Publication date: Available online 23 February 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Wesley S. Boyce Numerous external costs of logistics exist that can have an indirect impact on business or society. This paper outlines the external cost of truck driver health and how it may have a negative impact on supply chains. As key contributors to logistics and transportation, truck drivers have a substantial impact on the global economy. However, the high demands of their jobs can often lead them to overlook their health and well-being, which can negatively impact drivers, their firms, and supply chains. ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 24, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Traffic stress and bicycling to elementary and junior high school: Evidence from Davis, California
Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Dillon T. Fitch, Calvin G. Thigpen, Susan L. Handy The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of stress stemming from proximity to automobile traffic on bicycling to elementary and junior high school. A growing body of evidence shows that students who walk or bike to school have higher levels of overall physical activity. Turning around the decline in active travel to school in the U.S. could thus produce improvements in the health and wellbeing of students. Despite considerable research on the influe...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 20, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Cycling and cycling cessation in later life: Findings from the city of Malmö
This study aims to gain a greater insight into cycling as an element of mobility among those in later life. The characteristics and views of those who cycle, those who have never cycled, as well as those who have discontinued cycling in later life are the main focus. Malmö, a city in the south of Sweden with a strong emphasis on bicycle planning, is the study area. This study employed a mixed methods approach. The quantitative element comprised a survey which aimed to capture the trends at play when it comes to cycling within this age group. The qualitative element encompassed two focus groups which were carried out i...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 17, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Associations of public transport accessibility with walking, obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes
Conclusions In this Australian sample, public transport accessibility was positively associated with walking at recommended levels, including for people who are not otherwise vigorously active. Significance Walking is crucial for increasing physical activity levels and population health, as well as maximising public transport system efficiency. Building evidence on public transport accessibility and walking will enable governments to exploit this important synergy. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Perceived accessibility is an important factor in transport choice — Results from the AVENUE project
Conclusions Our results showed a strong association between perceived accessibility and transport choice even after adjusting for personal and environmental characteristics. Our results suggest that perceived accessibility should be taken into account when stimulating a shift from car use to cycling or walking. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A time-series analysis of motorway collisions in England considering road infrastructure, socio-demographics, traffic and weather characteristics
Publication date: Available online 11 February 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Paraskevi Michalaki, Mohammed Quddus, David Pitfield, Andrew Huetson Traffic injuries on motorways are a public health problem worldwide. Collisions on motorways represent a high injury rate in comparison to the entire national network. Furthermore, collisions that occur on the hard–shoulder are even more severe than those that happen on the main carriageway. The purpose of this paper is to explore motorway safety through the identification of patterns in the sequence of monthly hard–shoulder and ma...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Bicycling and walking in the Central Deep South states: Why is it rare and risky?
Publication date: Available online 12 February 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Ariel Godwin, Anne M. Price Although the Central Deep South region of the United States has warm weather and relatively flat terrain, bicycling and walking for transportation are less prevalent in the region than in the rest of the United States. Moreover, these modes have higher rates of traffic crashes and fatalities in the Central Deep South than elsewhere. We examine factors that may contribute to this outcome, including urban sprawl, historical development patterns, policies, goals, legislation, infrastructu...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 12, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Contextualizing research on transportation and health: A systems perspective
Publication date: Available online 11 February 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Michael J. Widener, Marianne Hatzopoulou During the past few decades, there has been a surge of interest in research seeking to understand how personal and public health are affected by transportation systems. A large and diverse literature has recently emerged as a result, which complements a rich literature developed beginning in the early 20th century. In this manuscript, we identify five unique research trajectories in health and transportation that, in many cases, seem unrelated. After exploring these five a...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 11, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Public transport and health outcomes in rural sub-Saharan Africa – A synthesis of professional opinion
We report the results of a synthesis of professional opinion obtained from in-person interviews and an internet survey on health issues related to the provision of public transport in rural SSA. Field interviews were conducted as semi-structured dialogues with some 40 transportation and public health professionals in the capital cities of Ethiopia, Ghana and Kenya. Additionally, 86 responses to an Internet survey were received from 38 African countries. Poor mechanical conditions of vehicles and risky driving behaviours were reported to be an important source of injury from rural road crashes. The factors contributing to u...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - February 2, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Examining the relationships between perceived neighborhood mobility characteristics, perceived incivilities, travel attitudes, and physical activity amongst university faculty and staff
Publication date: Available online 29 January 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Victoria C. Morckel This paper discusses the results of a pilot study that used a structural equation modeling approach (SEM) to examine whether self-reported physical activity levels can be explained as a function of participants’ perceived neighborhood mobility characteristics, perceived neighborhood incivilities (i.e. social and physical conditions in a neighborhood that are viewed as troublesome and potentially threatening by residents and users of public spaces), and travel attitudes. Data was collected ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - January 30, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Are perceptions of the environment in the workplace ‘neighbourhood’ associated with commuter walking?
Publication date: Available online 29 January 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Emma J. Adams, Fiona C. Bull, Charlie E. Foster Walking for the daily commute is one potential strategy for increasing physical activity levels. Understanding the behaviour-specific environmental correlates associated with commuter walking will help effective interventions to be identified and developed. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of perceptions of the environment in the workplace ‘neighbourhood’ and commuter walking. Participants in the baseline survey of the Walking Works ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - January 30, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Built environment in local relation with walking: Why here and not there?
Publication date: Available online 22 January 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Thierry Feuillet, Paul Salze, Hélène Charreire, Mehdi Menai, Christophe Enaux, Camille Perchoux, Franck Hess, Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Serge Hercberg, Chantal Simon, Christiane Weber, Jean-Michel Oppert Walking, as both a major mode of transport and the most common form of every-day physical activity, deserves further attention in health-related transportation studies. In this paper, we focused on the built environmental correlates of walking for errands and leisure in a sample of 4979 adult...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - January 22, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Secondary GIS built environment data for health research: Guidance for data development
Publication date: Available online 22 January 2016 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Orion T. Stewart, Heather A. Carlos, Chanam Lee, Ethan M. Berke, Philip M. Hurvitz, Li Li, Anne Vernez Moudon, Mark P. Doescher Built environment (BE) data in geographic information system (GIS) format are increasingly available from public agencies and private providers. These data can provide objective, low-cost BE data over large regions and are often used in public health research and surveillance. Yet challenges exist in repurposing GIS data for health research. The GIS data do not always capture desire...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - January 22, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The effect of active travel interventions conducted in work settings on driving to work: A systematic review
Conclusions Evaluations of active travel interventions with robust study designs such as controlled before–after studies and cluster-randomised controlled trials are needed to provide stronger evidence, and pragmatic approaches to implementing controlled trials will need to be considered. Consensus on outcome measures for intervention studies would assist future reviews and meta-analyses. Since most active travel interventions at present are not controlled studies, reviews which include uncontrolled studies are another important source of evidence to inform policy and practice. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - January 15, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Bicycle route preference and pollution inhalation dose: Comparing exposure and distance trade-offs
Publication date: Available online 28 December 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Alexander Y. Bigazzi, Joseph Broach, Jennifer Dill Do bicyclist preferences for low-traffic facilities lead to route choices that minimize air pollution inhalation doses? For both preferences and doses a routing trade-off can exist between exposure to motor vehicle traffic and trip duration. We use past studies of bicycle route preferences and pollution exposure levels to estimate exposure/distance trade-offs among roadway facility types. Exposure/distance trade-offs for preferences and doses are found to be sim...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - January 11, 2016 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Mobile phone use while driving: Underestimation of a global threat
Publication date: Available online 21 December 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Janet Ige, Amrit Banstola, Paul Pilkington The use of mobile phones (cell phones) has increased dramatically in the 21st century. The popularity of mobile phones and smart phones in the computer age can in part be associated with the growing problem of driver distraction. There are indications that the use of mobile phones while driving is one of the leading contributors to road traffic collisions (RTCs). However the true impact of the contribution of mobile phones to RTCs is masked by deficiencies in reporting....
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 22, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Variability in baseline travel behaviour as a predictor of changes in commuting by active travel, car and public transport: a natural experimental study
Conclusions People reporting a higher level of variability in mode choice were more likely to change their travel behaviour following an intervention. Future research should consider such variability as a potential predictor and effect modifier of travel and physical activity behaviour change, and its significance for the design and targeting of interventions. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 11, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Towards an understanding of the full spectrum of travel-related injuries among older people
Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Desmond O’Neill The development of a traffic system that is age-attuned needs to take account of both mobility and safety issues, in particular in terms of interventions which lead to a change in the relative proportion of modes of transport utilized, as has been postulated for the impact of medical screening of older drivers. Statistics for travel-related injury have been dominated by impacts between motorized vehicles and either other motorized vehicles or unprotected road users to the point of neglecting o...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - December 3, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Neighbourhood expectations and engagement with new cycling infrastructure in Sydney, Australia: Findings from a mixed method before-and-after study
Conclusion New cycling infrastructure provides opportunity for community growth and wellbeing. Community engagement, information and road education is needed to reduce barriers to allow car-orientated cultures to learn to interact with new cycling infrastructure. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 13, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Active travel is (generally) good for health, the environment and the economy
Publication date: Available online 10 November 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jennifer S Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 11, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Dynamic assessment of inhaled air pollution using GPS and accelerometer data
Publication date: Available online 6 November 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Bart Dewulf, Tijs Neutens, Delfien Van Dyck, Ilse de Bourdeaudhuij, Luc Int Panis, Carolien Beckx, Nico Van de Weghe Exposure to air pollution can have severe health impacts, especially for the elderly. To estimate the inhaled dose of air pollution, traditionally only the air pollution concentration at the home location is considered, without incorporating individual travel behavior and physical activity. This can lead to bias in health impact assessment and epidemiological studies, possibly underestimating e...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - November 7, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Inclusive and healthy cities: Commentary on transport, social exclusion and health
Publication date: Available online 31 October 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jason Corburn (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 31, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Tracking global bicycle ownership patterns
Publication date: Available online 26 September 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Olufolajimi Oke, Kavi Bhalla, David C. Love, Sauleh Siddiqui Over the past four decades, bicycle ownership has been documented in various countries but not globally analyzed. This paper presents an effort to fill this gap by tracking household bicycle possession. First, we gather survey data from 150 countries and extract percentage household bicycle ownership values. Performing cluster analysis, we determined four groups with the weighted mean percentage ownership ranging from 20% to 81%. Generally, bicycle o...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The mortality impact of bicycle paths and lanes related to physical activity, air pollution exposure and road safety
Conclusions The introduction of bicycle paths and lanes is likely to be associated with health benefits, primarily due to increased physical activity. More research is needed to estimate the absolute size of the health benefits. In particular, evaluations of the effects of bicycle infrastructure on time spent cycling are limited or of insufficient quality to infer causality. We recommend before-after studies measuring the effects of different interventions and in areas representing a wide range of base levels of cycling participation. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Travel by public transit to mammography facilities in 6 US urban areas
We examined lack of private vehicle access and 30min or longer public transportation travel time to mammography facilities for women 40 years of age or older in the urban areas of Boston, Philadelphia, San Antonio, San Diego, Denver, and Seattle to identify transit marginalized populations – women for whom these travel characteristics may jointly present a barrier to clinic access. This ecological study used sex and race/ethnicity data from the 2010 US Census and household vehicle availability data from the American Community Survey 2008–2012, all at Census tract level. Using the public transportation option on...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Indigenous ethnicity as a social determinant of exposure to riskier modes of transport: A survey study in Taiwan
This study tests (1) indigenous ethnicity as a predictor of PTW usage, and (2) educational attainment and personal income as mediators between indigenous ethnicity and PTW usage. Based on data from the Taiwan Social Change Survey (n=2209), results indicated that most indigenous respondents reported PTW as their primary mode of transport (73%), and that odds of PTW usage among indigenous persons were 2.80 times higher than non-indigenous Taiwanese. The association between indigenous ethnicity and PTW usage was significantly mediated by educational attainment. Lower educational attainment and personal income were correlated ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Engaging communities in changing the environment to promote transport-related walking: Evaluation of route use in the ‘Fitter for Walking’ project
Publication date: Available online 9 October 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Emma J. Adams, Nick Cavill Promoting walking for transport may help to increase physical activity levels. Associations between the built environment and walking for transport have been well reported. Engaging communities in making small-scale changes to local routes is one potential low-cost strategy to improve neighbourhood environments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in pedestrian use of local routes following environmental changes made by communities and local authorities (LAs) in the ‘F...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Heat exposure during non-motorized travel: Implications for transportation policy under climate change
In this study we develop a new method to assess outdoor heat exposure during non-motorized travel by combining simulated urban meteorology and transportation-activity data. We demonstrate its utility through application to several real-world planning issues using data from the San Francisco Bay Area. Specifically, we examine spatial and social disparities in heat exposure and find that socially disadvantaged (low-income people and zero-vehicle households) groups are disproportionately exposed to transport-related heat. Since the propensity to walk and bicycle tends to decrease with socioeconomic status (SES) and because lo...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Commentary on changes in school travel patterns
Publication date: Available online 21 October 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): J. Hine (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Gender-based differences in school travel mode choice behaviour: Examining the relationship between the neighbourhood environment and perceived traffic safety
This study makes a novel contribution by examining the relationship between the objectively measured neighbourhood characteristics and parental perceptions of traffic safety, and gender based differences in this relationship, as it relates to school travel mode choice behaviour (walking versus being driven) in Toronto, Canada. Structural equation models were estimated to explore home-to-school trip data on 720 students attending 5th/ 6th grade in 16 public schools. Results indicated that boys were more likely to walk to school than girls. Distance, sidewalk unavailability and intersection density were inversely correlated ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The tracking of active travel and its relationship with body composition in UK adolescents
Conclusions Maintenance of active travel behaviours throughout adolescence may help to protect against the development of excess BMI in males. In addition to encouraging the adoption of active travel to school, public health messages should aim to prevent drop out from active travel to promote good health in youth. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - October 28, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The association of trip distance with walking to reach public transit: Data from the California Household Travel Survey
Conclusions Individuals appear to be willing to walk further to reach transit than existing guidelines indicate. This implies that for any given transit stop, the zone of potential riders who will walk to reach transit is relatively large. Future research should clarify who transit-related walkers are, and why some are more willing to walk longer distances to transit than others. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 20, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Transport, social exclusion and health
Publication date: Available online 15 September 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Roger L. Mackett, Roselle Thoreau This paper explores the nature of social exclusion and how transport contributes to it by providing barriers to access. Transport influences health in several ways: by providing physical activity through walking and cycling, and by providing access to healthy food, recreation facilities and healthcare. Transport produces externalities including traffic casualties and vehicle emissions. These effects impinge on society unequally with socially excluded people able to access fewer ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 15, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Congestion pricing and active transport – evidence from five opportunities for natural experiment.
This study aims to examine the physical activity effects of congestion pricing, with the health benefits of physical activity well established. Congestion pricing schemes implemented internationally were considered as ‘natural experiments’ and evidence of modal shift from vehicle to active forms of transport or physical activity effect was reviewed. Twelve studies were included from a search of peer-reviewed and ‘grey’ literature, with overall evidence for a physical activity or modal shift effect considered weak. The quality of the available evidence was also considered to be low. This is not to sa...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 11, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Downtown vibrancy influences public health and safety outcomes in urban counties
Conclusions Urban counties with more vibrant downtowns may have more favorable population-level health and safety outcomes. Both composite and individual measures of vibrancy offer useful insights when considering mobility-related health and safety outcomes. Investments in vibrant centers that improve walkability and accessibility may encourage active transportation. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 11, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Health impact model for modal shift from car use to cycling or walking in Flanders: application to two bicycle highways
Publication date: Available online 8 September 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jurgen Buekers, Evi Dons, Bart Elen, Luc Int Panis In Flanders, a European hot spot for air pollution, alternatives to car transport are put in place to increase the daily level of physical activity (PA) among the population and reduce air pollution and global warming. To evaluate the economic impact of increased PA (cycling and walking), a health impact model was developed for a given volume of PA, relative to car use, within a defined population in Flanders. Flanders is an interesting region because of the co...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 8, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Exposure to walkable neighbourhoods in urban areas increases utilitarian walking: Longitudinal study of Canadians
Conclusions Exposure to more walkable neighbourhoods and moving from less walkable to more walkable neighbourhoods were associated with increases in utilitarian walking, even for individuals who were otherwise inactive in their leisure time. Walkable neighbourhood environments have the potential to increase utilitarian walking and walking-friendly neighbourhood design should be considered amongst policy options for increasing population level physical activity. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 8, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A pilot study exploring the measurement of intergenerational differences in independent mobility
Conclusion The results highlight the need for a standard measurement protocol for IM that facilitates comparability among studies. Maximum IM distance estimated via web-based interactive mapping may be a promising choice in this respect. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - September 8, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Of shoes and ships and sealing wax
Publication date: September 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 2, Issue 3 (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 21, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Inhalation of particulate matter in three different routes for the same OD pair: A case study with pedestrians in the city of Lisbon
Publication date: Available online 12 August 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Inês D. Do Vale, Ana S. Vasconcelos, Gonçalo O. Duarte Exposure to high levels of particulate matter (PM) can lead to an increased risk of development of several diseases. In a city, to ensure a sustainable quality of life for its population it is important to understand the way to measure and quantify the PM exposure, especially in areas that can be considered threatening. This paper defines a method, which is based on experimental data to measure the total amount of particulate matter inhalation in ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 12, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Do open streets initiatives impact local businesses? The case of Sunday Streets in San Francisco, California
Conclusions Sunday Streets increased business activity along its routes. Engaged businesses perceived greater benefits. Merchant engagement with open streets initiatives offers additional community benefits. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 11, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A15 An investigation of the relationship between active transport and cardiovascular disease that considers the importance of the inclusion of local people in transport planning policies
Publication date: June 2015 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 2, Issue 2, Supplement Author(s): James Rhodes (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - August 2, 2015 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research