2268 Estimating the Determinants of Cycling: From Area to Road Network Levels
Conclusions Newly available data, combined with emerging high performance and open source statistical software, mean that large natural experiments on the impact of new infrastructure on mode choice can now be performed at the national level using geographically detailed data at the origin-destination level. This has the potential to make the prioritisation of new infrastructure much more evidence-based and holds the promise of allowing a-priori benefit-cost estimates to be automated to support transport planners to enable a rapid transition away from fossil fuels and towards healthy travel patterns across the world, in ur...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2263 Environmental Preferences for Transportation Cycling Among Older Adults: An Experiment with Manipulated Photographs
Conclusions To promote transportation cycling among older adults through environmental modifications, the provision of cycle paths separated from motorized traffic and pedestrians should be prioritized. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2262 Do Electric Bicycles Contribute to Active Ageing?
Conclusions Our findings suggest that e-bikes contribute to active ageing, especially among those known to be at risk for physical inactivity. Future research should examine e-bikes’ effects on total physical activity and health outcomes using objective measures in longitudinal and experimental designs. Furthermore, research about the crash risks related to e-bike use among older adults is warranted. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2261 Estimating the Health Benefits of a Proposed Regional Transportation Plan
Conclusions The projected health impacts of the RTP are substantial, yet conservative since they consider only mortality and diabetes incidence. The results provided an additional health-based argument for government investment, as well as signaled public health's interest in building healthier communities. In addition to initial media coverage, the report has been repeatedly cited at local, provincial and national levels. While impossible to directly attribute causality, subsequent government policies have included strengthening the accountability for integrated land use and transportation planning, as well as substantial...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2259 Funding Transportation for Prosperity Sustainability & amp; Equity
Publication date: June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9, Supplement Author(s): Rick Rybeck Studies have shown that urban sprawl creates auto-dependency, contributes to crash deaths and injuries, sedentary lifestyles and increases per-capita energy consumption and associated air pollution. Sprawl also increases impervious surfaces (roofs, streets, parking lots, driveways, etc.) which exacerbate stormwater runoff and water pollution. Some extol compact development (“smart growth”) as the antidote. But, if smart growth is so “smart,” how come there's so much “dumb grow...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

2253 No Small Potatoes: Making the Health and Economic Case for Walking and Bicycling in Rural Idaho
Publication date: June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9, Supplement Author(s): Donald Kostelec Baked. Fried. Scalloped. Mashed. Boiled. The diversity of Idaho communities is almost as diverse as the ways to serve the state's most famous crop; potatoes. And the way Idaho addresses walking and bicycling is just as creative. As Idaho's rural areas remain challenged by a loss of manufacturing, logging, and mining, the small cities that dot the state have worked to re-tool their image and find creative, low-budget ways to improve walking and bicycling and promote a healthy community. This session wil...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A pedestrian experience framework to help identify impediments to walking by mobility-challenged pedestrians
Publication date: Available online 23 June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Dong Yeong Jeong, Jiyoung Kwahk, Sung H. Han, Joohwan Park, Mingyu Lee, Hyeji Jang This paper presents a strategic framework that can help researchers collect and analyze experiences of mobility-challenged pedestrians (MCPs) effectively and comprehensively. The framework is necessary since previous studies have focused only on pragmatic quality of an environment for MCPs. Focusing on pragmatic quality may be insufficient to improve experience in walking environment of MCPs. The framework that covers both pragmatic and h...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 23, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The relationship of car driving and bicycle riding on physical activity and social participation in Japanese rural areas
This study focused on car driving and bicycle riding and aimed to examine the association of these transportation methods with physical activity and social participation in Japanese older adults. This cross-sectional study included 374 Japanese older adults living in a rural area. Physical activity was evaluated using the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly. The data on transportation mode and 4 types of social participation were obtained from a self-reported questionnaire. An analysis of covariance and a multivariate Poisson regression analysis were conducted to evaluate associations. The sample comprised 304 particip...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 21, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Examining influences on active travel by sex among college students
Conclusions Findings from the present study suggest that among college students AT was higher among men than women. Targeting women over men for PA and AT interventions in a university setting may be warranted. Identifying populations at risk for physical inactivity may be useful in developing and implementing tailored multi-factor interventions. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Going peripatetic
Publication date: June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health, Volume 9 Author(s): Seraphim Alvanides (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 14, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Leisure-time physical activity, objective urban neighborhood built environment, and overweight and obesity of Chinese school-age children
This study aims to investigate the associations between objective urban neighborhood built environment, leisure-time physical activity, and overweight and obesity of Chinese school-age children between 6 and 13 years old. This study conducted surveys at thirty-two public elementary schools, evenly chosen from four strata of residential building density and located in 16 urban districts of Shanghai, China. A total of 719 completed surveys were collected between May 2015 and April 2016. There were 447 records geocoded to their home address. Objective neighborhood built environmental attributes were measured in 200-m and 400-...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The healthy immigrant effect and active commuting
This study examines two hypotheses: foreign-born individuals have increased odds of active commuting compared to Canadian-born individuals – a ‘healthy immigrant effect’; and among the foreign-born, there is an inverse association between time since immigration and time spent active commuting – loss of this effect over time. Data was compiled from more than 59,000 individuals from the 2013–2014 cycle of the Canadian Community Health Survey and probability weighted to account for the survey sampling method. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine relationships. Four active c...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Human health risk assessment of major air pollutants at transport corridors of Delhi, India
Publication date: Available online 13 June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Amrit Kumar, Rajeev Kumar Mishra The present study undertake an assessment of human health risk regarding mortality and morbidity induced by multiple air pollutants prevailing at 36 transport corridors of the National Capital Territory (NCT) of Delhi, India. The study, covering PM10, PM2.5, SO2 and NO2, utilized the Risk of Mortality/Morbidity due to Air Pollution (Ri-MAP) model in a bid to assess the direct health impacts in the year 2016. The World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines were used to calculate mortality ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 13, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Traffic-related air pollution and solid organ transplant failure in Great Britain: A retrospective cohort study
Conclusions Our analysis does not confirm previously reported associations between traffic-related air pollution exposure and the risk of transplant failure. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 10, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Pedestrian hybrid beacon signals: Identifying characteristics associated with negative consequences to reduce danger at mid-block locations
Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Srinivas S. Pulugurtha, Venu Madhav Kukkapalli, Ajinkya S. Mane The focus of this paper is on an evaluation of negative consequences due to the installation of pedestrian hybrid beacon (PHB) signals and to identify associated characteristics to proactively plan and reduce danger at mid-block locations. Data for thirteen mid-block locations with a PHB signal in the city of Charlotte, North Carolina was gathered to conduct before-after analysis using Empirical Bayes (EB) method. Data for fifty-nine mid-block locations with...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Perception of road hazards in a Tanzanian Secondary School before and after a traffic psychology intervention
Publication date: Available online 7 June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Paolo Perego, Federica Biassoni, Mark J. King, Maria Rita Ciceri In Tanzania in 2014, 3760 people were killed on the roads, and 14,530 were injured (Tanzanian Traffic Police, 2015). One barrier to addressing this problem is the fatalistic belief, common in Africa, that a road crash happens ‘because it has to happen’. However, another possible reason is a lack of knowledge about sources of risk when using the road. The purpose of this research was to test a traffic psychology training program designed to impro...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Latent profile analysis of young adolescents ’ physical activity across locations on schooldays
Conclusions Although most participants did not meet the MVPA guideline, the six Active profiles showed the places in which many adolescents were able to achieve the 60-min/day guideline. The home and school neighborhood (partly through walking to school), other locations, and to a lesser extent the home, appeared to be key sources for physical activity that distinguished active from insufficiently active adolescents. Finding the right match between the individual and physical activity source/location may be a promising strategy for increasing active travel and MVPA in adolescents. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 8, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Potential health and economic benefits of banning diesel traffic in Dublin, Ireland
Publication date: Available online 2 June 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Shreya Dey, Brian Caulfield, Bidisha Ghosh Air pollution has been linked to 491,000 deaths in Europe annually and diesel vehicles are one of the major sources of two deadly air pollutants, PM2.5 (Particulate Matter) and NOx (Oxides of Nitrogen). Ireland has the highest number of newly registered diesel vehicles in Europe with a share of 43.57% in the overall fleet which is expected to increase to 73.9% by 2025. This will have significant health and financial impacts, especially in the urban areas. The present study quant...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - June 2, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Investigation of associations between marijuana law changes and marijuana-involved fatal traffic crashes: A state-level analysis
In conclusion, no significant changes in the number of marijuana-related crashes were observed after medical legalization only. Nevertheless, an increased number of marijuana-related crashes were observed after all other types of the marijuana law changes. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 26, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Facilitators and barriers to winter cycling: Case study of a downtown university in Toronto, Canada
Publication date: Available online 24 May 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Tamara Nahal, Raktim Mitra Cycling rates in many North American cities and regions decline significantly in winter months, which is a major challenge in advancing active transportation-related policy and programs. This research investigates travel behavior of current cyclists who commute to Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. By combining data from two transportation surveys, this research examines the correlates of self-reported propensity of cycling throughout the year (including winter months), in comparison to cyc...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 24, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Investigating the barriers in a typical journey by public transport users with disabilities
Publication date: Available online 21 May 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jun Park, Subeh Chowdhury Accessibility to public transport is increasingly recognized as a critical element in the livelihoods of people with disabilities. Although there have been advancements to better cater for the needs of people with disabilities, budgetary constraints mean that every issue cannot be addressed. There are still many barriers restricting independent travel for this group of people. Social exclusion is often a result of their inability to use or access a public transport system. The present study inve...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Choosing safe and suitable bicycle routes to integrate cycling and public transport systems
In this study, it was aimed to examine all these negative and positive effective parameters on safety and choice while integrating cycling with a public transport (bus link) system. To determine effective parameters on route choice, a Questionnaire Survey (QS) was carried out on 460 participants who are cycling for a long time in Isparta City/Turkey. It was obtained from the QS that Accident Prone Areas (APA) are the most important factor on cycling and public transport integration. The other parameters are determined as Bus Lane (BL), Road Side Car Park (RSCP), Bicycle Parks (BP), Road Grade (RG), Signalization (S), Traff...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Predicting walking and cycling behaviour change using an extended Theory of Planned Behaviour
Conclusions This is one of the first known studies to examine psychological predictors of change in walking and cycling for transport and recreation using an extended TPB. Future interventions to promote walking and cycling through individually delivered approaches might consider fostering the development of positive attitudes, perceived behavioural control, intentions, and habits for these behaviours. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 21, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Is Vision Zero important for promoting health?
Publication date: Available online 18 May 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Nicola Christie (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 19, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Decreased healthcare resource utilization associated with enhancement of a state graduated driver licensing law
Conclusions This study is the first to use linked data to evaluate the effects of GDL on healthcare resource utilization by teen drivers and their occupants. The post-GDL enhancement period was associated with reductions in MVC-related ED visits, inpatient hospitalizations, total hospital charges, and total days of hospitalization. Increases in mean inpatient hospital charges were noted and may indicate a reduction in minor injury crashes. Despite attempts to mitigate the confounding effects of the economy on teen driving, it is likely that economic influences are at least partially responsible for the observed decrease in...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

What articles are in scope for the Journal of Transport and Health?
Publication date: Available online 18 May 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jennifer S. Mindell (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Impacts of roundabouts on urban air quality: A case study of Keene, New Hampshire, USA
This study seeks to understand how local air quality may have changed in the time since converting to roundabouts. A before-and-after comparison was performed using data gathered by the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services from 1999–2014. In the time period following roundabout conversion, ozone levels stayed the same but PM2.5 levels were as much as 40% lower. As a related result, the proportion of the year that was classified as “Unhealthy for Sensitive Groups” or “Unhealthy” was 0.3–1.8% lower in the “after” time period as well. Installing roundabouts at both...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 18, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Built environment associates of active school travel in New Zealand children and youth: A systematic meta-analysis using individual participant data
Publication date: Available online 1 May 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Erika Ikeda, Tom Stewart, Nicholas Garrett, Victoria Egli, Sandra Mandic, Jamie Hosking, Karen Witten, Greer Hawley, El Shadan Tautolo, Judy Rodda, Antoni Moore, Melody Smith This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the associations between active travel to school and the neighbourhood built environment in children and youth by systematically identifying and collating data from New Zealand studies. Data from five studies involving 2844 children and youth aged 6–19 years were included in the meta-analysis. D...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - May 1, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Inequalities in self-report road injury risk in Britain: A new analysis of National Travel Survey data, focusing on pedestrian injuries
Publication date: Available online 30 April 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Rachel Aldred In 2007, Britain's (since 2013 England's) National Travel Survey started asking respondents about experiences of ‘road accidents’. This paper conducts new injury analysis using NTS data from 2007-15. The resultant dataset contains 147,185 adult individuals (weighted), of whom 17,990 reported experiencing one or more ‘road accidents’ in the three years prior to the survey date. This dataset includes incidents involving other road users and those that did not, less likely in general ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Reversal of the road death trend in the U.S. in 2015 –2016: An examination of the climate and economic hypotheses
This study examines the association of road deaths per population among the 48 contiguous U.S. states to average annual temperature, precipitation, unemployment, insurance cost, gasoline prices, registered vehicles per population, mix of types of vehicles and median age of the population using logistic regression. Least squares regression is used to examine the association of miles traveled per vehicle to average annual temperatures, unemployment, insurance costs and gasoline prices. The association of national unemployment trend and road death trend is examined using least squares regression. Per population, road deaths a...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Cross-sector collaboration on Safe Routes to School policy advocacy and implementation: A mixed methods evaluation from Minnesota
Publication date: Available online 19 April 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jennifer E. Pelletier, Melissa N. Laska, Marilyn S. Nanney, Rebekah Pratt Cross-sector collaboration has been a crucial element of planning and implementing large-scale obesity prevention-related policies and programs in the United States, including Safe Routes to School (SRTS), which promotes walking and bicycling through physical infrastructure changes and programmatic efforts. Minnesota provides a unique opportunity to evaluate a collaborative partnership that successfully implemented and institutionalized one of th...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 19, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Impact of physical and social environments on the walking behaviour of Hong Kong's older adults
This study examined the associations between physical environment (facilitators and barriers), social environment, and walking among older adults in Hong Kong. Methods Between April and December 2016, a sample of 679 adults aged 65 years or above was recruited in Neighbourhood Elderly Centres from across the 18 council districts of Hong Kong. Participants were asked to complete validated questionnaires that were used to assess the above constructs; participants were asked to track their daily step counts over 7 days using an accelerometer. Structural Equation Modelling was performed to examine the studied relationships by ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Do differences in built environments explain age differences in transport walking across neighbourhoods?
Conclusion Neighbourhood-level factors semeed to influenced the WfT of younger and older adults differently, with older adults being more sensitive to their neighbourhood environment. In Brisbane, age differences in WfT were smaller in areas with higher residential density and street connectivity. These results favor the ongoing investigation of demographic heterogeneity around neighbourhood averages in other urban contexts to inform tailored ecological interventions that facilitate WfT for all age groups everywhere, supporting active aging communities. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The role of beliefs in the use of hands-free and handheld mobile phones while driving
Conclusions Differences in beliefs (particularly behavioural and control beliefs) were found between daily and less frequent users of handheld mobile phones, meaning that they may underlie the decision to engage in this risky behaviour. Likewise, several specific beliefs differed between daily and less frequent users of handheld and hands-free mobile phones (using their time effectively). These results may provide useful information for developing countermeasures aimed at curbing mobile phone use while driving. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Particulate air pollution and noise: Assessing commuter exposure in africa's most populous city
This study observed remarkably high particulate air pollution and noise exposures during commuting in the major African city. A major shift to modern mass transportation systems would limit commuter exposure. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 15, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

A conceptual framework to assess the unmet travel needs in later life
This study proposes a conceptual framework for improving the evaluation of unmet travel needs amongst the older population. Unmet travel needs can be defined as mobility needs that remain unfulfilled due to the inability of accomplishing needed or wished trips and activities. Gerontological and transport research are putting increasing focus on the role that mobility plays in later life. Analyses of studies investigating the relationship between ageing and mobility reveal that these are generally characterised by relying only on realised journeys and activities. However, very little has been investigated so far in terms of...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 14, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Active travel despite motorcar access. A city-wide, GIS-based multilevel study on neighborhood walkability and active travel in Germany
Conclusions The positive association between neighborhood walkability and active travel shown in other urban contexts was confirmed in a historically evolved city in Germany. The observed effect varied with respondents’ age and available motorcars, which is in line with recent findings and suggests that public health advocacy in urban planning could promote physical activity on a population level, including those with motorcar access. Graphical abstract (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 12, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Residence in unsafe neighborhoods is associated with active transportation among poor women: Geographic Research on Wellbeing (GROW) Study
This study investigated associations of neighborhood context with active transportation among women with children after controlling for sociodemographic variables. We used data from the Geographic Research on Wellbeing study (GROW). In 2012–2013, GROW surveyed mothers who participated in California's Maternal and Infant Health Assessment. The dependent variable was active vs. inactive transportation. Mothers were coded as doing active transportation if they responded that they “walked,” “walked and took public transportation,” or ‘rode a bike,” to most places they went in the previ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 7, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Changes in participation, demographics and hazard associated with mandatory bicycle helmets in New South Wales, Australia
Publication date: Available online 6 April 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Jim Lemon (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - April 6, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Perceptions of walkability and determinants of walking behaviour among urban seniors in Toronto, Canada
This study investigated the relationship between objective and subjective measures of walkability for seniors living in Toronto through a multi-phased, mixed-methods approach. Two neighbourhoods within the city were selected as case study areas. Wychwood represented a high walkability neighbourhood and Edenbridge-Humber Valley represented a neighbourhood lower in walkability. The walkability audit, the Senior Walking Environmental Assessment Tool – Revised (SWEAT-R), served as the objective measure. Subjective measures included the use of focus groups, go-along interviews, and traditional interviews with twenty-eight...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 30, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Trends in cycling and cycle related injuries and a calculation of prevented morbidity and mortality
In conclusion, in Denmark, the number of cycling trips have steadily increased over the past 17 years while cycling related injuries show a concomitant decline. Intuitively one might expect cycle related injuries to increase with increased cycling, but a decrease was observed in injuries. Health benefits of cycling calculated from cohort studies were 21 times higher than risk of injuries and for mortality alone the ratio was 238. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 28, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The effect of an italian nationwide mandatory visibility aids law for cyclists
Publication date: Available online 24 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Gabriele Prati The role of conspicuity in preventing bicycle–motorized vehicle collisions has been the subject of investigation. To date, no study has evaluated the impact on bicycle safety of legislation imposing bicycling visibility aids. The aim of the present study is to investigate whether a legislation imposing high-visibility clothing for cyclist affects bicycle safety. Data on the monthly number of vehicles (including bicycles) involved in road crashes during the period 2001–2015 were obtained from ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Does telecommuting promote sustainable travel and physical activity?
Publication date: Available online 24 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Sandip Chakrabarti Researchers have explored the efficacy of telecommuting as a travel demand management strategy in the U.S. Conditions under which telecommuting can reduce VMT (vehicle miles traveled) and ease peak-period traffic congestion have been extensively investigated; empirical findings are well documented in the literature. Analysis of the impact of telecommuting on non-motorized travel, public transit use, and physical activity, however, has received relatively less attention in the past. In this paper, I u...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 25, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Do Australian drivers give female cyclists more room when passing?
Publication date: Available online 22 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Narelle Haworth, Kristiann C. Heesch, Amy Schramm, Ashim Kumar Debnath Cycling has demonstrated health benefits, but the fear of collisions with motor vehicles discourages many people from riding on the road, particularly women. Previous studies have reported mixed results about the factors influencing the distances left by drivers when passing cyclists. The present research aimed to control for other rider, roadway and traffic factors to understand whether cyclist gender influences passing distances. Video recordings ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Parental barriers to active commuting to school in children: does parental gender matter?
Conclusions Although some barriers to ACS were similar for both parents (distance, convenience of driving and parental mode of commuting to work), other barriers were specific to mothers (children's extra-curricular activities organization and lack of children's interest in walking to school). Interventions strategies for promoting ACS in children focusing on parents should be gender-specific. (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 22, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Te Ara Mua –Future Streets: Knowledge exchange and the highs and lows of researcher-practitioner collaboration to design active travel infrastructure
Publication date: Available online 21 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Karen Witten, Penelope Carroll, Octavia Calder-Dawe, Melody Smith, Adrian Field, Jamie Hosking Transforming vehicle-focused street infrastructure to support a shift to active travel modes can pose a complex interdisciplinary challenge requiring innovation and collaboration between residents, researchers and transport design and policy practitioners. Te Ara Mua-Future Streets is a street redesign intervention study that aims to slow traffic, change driver behaviour and make walking and cycling easier and safer in Mānge...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 21, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Using crowdsourced data to monitor change in spatial patterns of bicycle ridership
Publication date: Available online 21 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Darren Boss, Trisalyn Nelson, Meghan Winters, Colin J. Ferster Cycling is a sustainable mode of transportation with numerous health, environmental and social benefits. Investments in cycling specific infrastructure are being made with the goal of increasing ridership and population health benefits. New infrastructure has the potential to impact the upgraded corridor as well as nearby street segments and cycling patterns across the city. Evaluation of the impact of new infrastructure is often limited to manual or automa...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 21, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Psychological Wellbeing Benefits of Simulated Exposure to Five Urban Settings: an Experimental Study From the Pedestrian's Perspective
Publication date: Available online 15 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Anna Bornioli, Graham Parkhurst, Phillip L. Morgan The potential health benefits of walking in attractive, predominantly built-up urban settings have not received much attention from scholars, despite the global need to increase walking levels in cities. The current experimental study assessed the affective outcomes associated with several urban walking settings, with a focus on the presence of motor-traffic and architectural styles from different historic periods. We employed a mixed within-between subjects design (n ...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 15, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

Best practices for promoting cycling amongst university students and employees
Publication date: Available online 10 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Oliver Wilson, Nicole Vairo, Melissa Bopp, Dangaia Sims, Katherine Dutt, Brooke Pinkos The benefits of active commuting (walking and biking to work) are well documented, though rates of participation remain low in the United States. University policies, programs and environments significantly influence student and employee's travel mode choice, though relatively little is known about appropriate strategies. Therefore, this study's purpose was to examine the best practices universities could implement in order to increa...
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 10, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research

The virtual special section of active transport papers from the 2017 active living research conference
Publication date: Available online 7 March 2018 Source:Journal of Transport & Health Author(s): Rodney Lyn, James F. Sallis (Source: Journal of Transport and Health)
Source: Journal of Transport and Health - March 8, 2018 Category: Occupational Health Source Type: research