Epidemiology of panic attacks, panic disorder and the moderating role of age: Results from a population-based study
Panic Attacks (PA) are defined as an abrupt surge of intense fear or intense discomfort that reaches a peak within minutes, and during that time four or more of 13 symptoms occur (Craske  et al., 2010). According to DSM-5 criteria (American Psychiatric Association, 2013), a diagnosis of panic disorder (PD) requires the presence of recurrent PA and persistent worry about suffering future attacks and their consequences. Epidemiological studies report a lifetime PD prevalence rate between 1.4 and 4.1% in the adult general population (Dick et al., 1994; Eaton et al., 1994; Weissman et al., 19...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 15, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Beatriz Olaya, Maria Victoria Moneta, Marta Miret, Jos é Luis Ayuso-Mateos, Josep Maria Haro Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Persistent Depressive and Grief Symptoms for up to 10 years Following Perinatal Loss: Involvement of Negative Cognitions
Perinatal loss (PL) is probably the most devastating form of death, with heightened risk of postloss mental health complications (Fern ández-Alcántara& Zech, 2017; Hunter, Tussis,& MacBeth, 2017; Lundorff et al., 2017). PL encompasses fetal death before 24 weeks' gestation, termination of pregnancy for fetal anomaly, stillbirth, and neonatal death (up to 1 month after the birth). Most empirical studies have shown that PL has detrimental effects on the psychological wellbeing of bereaved parents (e.g., Hunter et al., 2017; Zetumer et al., 2015). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 15, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Kossigan Kokou-Kpolou, Olga Megalakaki, Nicolas Nieuviarts Source Type: research

The relations between empathy, guilt, shame and depression in inpatient adolescents
Affective empathy, the ability to experience and share the emotions of others, and cognitive empathy, the capacity to take the perspective and understand the emotions of another person (e.g. Decety and Jackson, 2004; Shamay-Tsoory et  al., 2009), have been shown to associate with positive interpersonal outcomes, including better relationships with friends and partners and prosocial behaviors (Chow et al., 2013; Smith and Rose, 2011; Soenens et al., 2007). However, paradoxically high levels of affective empathy have been shown to be associated with elevated depressive symptoms (e.g. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Malgorzata Gambin, Carla Sharp Source Type: research

A meta-analysis of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) use during prenatal depression and risk of low birth weight and small for gestational age
A previous epidemiological study has estimated the prevalence of prenatal depression at 12.4% in the United States in 2011 (Le  Strat et al., 2011). Prenatal depression has been associated with an increase in maternal mortalities, including substance abuse, suicidal ideation and postpartum depression (Miller et al., 2013). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the first-line antidepressants prescribed for the treatment of prenatal depression (Fleschler and Peskin, 2008), have been suggested to negatively impact upon the health of the fetus and neonate, with their use linked to prete...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Xiaofeng Zhao, Qian Liu, Suxia Cao, Jianyue Pang, Huijie Zhang, Tingting Feng, Yajie Deng, Jing Yao, Hengfen Li Source Type: research

Differentiating responders and non-responders to rTMS treatment for depression after one week using resting EEG connectivity measures
Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective therapy for treatment resistant depression, but in a recent meta-analysis showed low response (29.3%) and remission rates (18.6%) (Berlim  et al., 2014). Typically, rTMS treatments are provided five days per week, often during inpatient admission, making this non-response rate particularly costly for both patients and clinics (George and Post, 2011). Providing clinicians with an ability to predict response is desirable. rTMS treat ment research has indicated that reduction in depression severity from baseline (BL) to endpoint shows a bi...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: NW Bailey, KE Hoy, NC Rogasch, RH Thomson, S McQueen, D Elliot, CM Sullivan, BD Fulcher, ZJ Daskalakis, PB Fitzgerald Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The association between gestational diabetes mellitus and postpartum depressive symptomatology: a prospective cohort study
Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and postpartum depression (PPD) are both highly prevalent in perinatal conditions. In Finland, during the last five years, the 12-month prevalence of GDM has been reported to be approximately 9 –13% (National Institute of Health and Welfare, 2016), and worldwide, the respective figures have been as high as 17.8% (Coustan et al., 2010). Nevertheless, the prevalence of GDM has varied in the literature due to inconsistent diagnostic criteria and study populations (Mcintyre et al., 2015) . (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Aleksi Ruohom äki, Elena Toffol, Subina Upadhyaya, Leea Keski-Nisula, Juha Pekkanen, Jussi Lampi, Sari Voutilainen, Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen, Seppo Heinonen, Kirsti Kumpulainen, Markku Pasanen, Soili M. Lehto Source Type: research

Depression literacy and stigma influence how parents perceive and respond to adolescent depressive symptoms
Adolescence is a peak period for the development of depressive disorders (Lewinsohn  et al., 1998), which often continues into adulthood (Rao et al., 1999). In addition to having a negative impact on academic performance, social relationships, and increasing the risk of substance use and suicidality (Lewinsohn et al., 1998; Rao et al., 1999), adolescent depression is associat ed with increased levels of conflict with parents (Lewinsohn et al., 1998). Unhelpful parent-child communication patterns can exacerbate negative emotionality in the adolescent. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Carly Johnco, Ronald M. Rapee Source Type: research

The association between socio-economic status and depression among older adults in Finland, Poland and Spain: a comparative cross-sectional study of distinct measures and pathways
Socioeconomic status, as measured by education, occupation or income, is associated with depression. However, data are lacking on the psychosocial, material and behavioral mediators of these associations. We have examined the association of education, occupation and income with depression and the potential mediations using community-based data. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Joan Dom ènech-Abella, Jordi Mundó, Matilde Leonardi, Sommath Chatterji, Beata Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Seppo Koskinen, Jose Luis Ayuso-Mateos, Josep Maria Haro Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Cognitive biases predict symptoms of depression, anxiety and wellbeing above and beyond neuroticism in adolescence
Depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide (WHO,  2017). Research shows that mental health disorders, including depression and anxiety, originate in adolescence (MQ, 2016). Lifetime prevalence in adolescents (13-18-year olds) was reported to be 11% for depression and 32% for anxiety (Avenevoli et al., 2015; Merikangas et al., 2010). Importantl y, earlier onset of depression predicts longer episodes, more severe course, poorer recovery and higher recurrence rates (Dunn and Goodyer; 2006). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Eilidh M Smith, Shirley Reynolds, Faith Orchard, Heather C Whalley, Stella WY Chan Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Preliminary support for the role of reward relevant effort and chronotype in the depression/insomnia comorbidity
Sleep disturbances, such as difficulty falling and staying asleep and early morning awakenings, are among the diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD); however, approximately two-thirds of individuals with depression experience sleep disturbance that meets criteria for insomnia disorder (Franzen& Buysse,  2008). Insomnia comorbid with depression increases the likelihood of depression relapse, treatment non-response, and functional impairment (Franzen& Buysee,  2008), There is evidence, albeit somewhat mixed, that independent treatment of insomnia improves depression (Taylor et al., 201...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Elaine M. Boland, Kassondra Bertulis, Shirley Chen, Michael E. Thase, Philip R. Gehrman Source Type: research

Long-term treatment response to continuous cycling course in bipolar disorders: A meta-analysis.
In a pioneering work, Koukopoulos et al. (1980) identified four patterns of course in bipolar disorders (BD): 1) manic –depression-free interval (MDI; in which the cycle starts with (hypo)mania, followed by depression and then by a free interval); 2) depression–mania- free interval (DMI; in which the cycle starts with depression, followed by (hypo)mania, and then by a free interval); 3) continuous cycling course (CCC), with depressive and (hypo)manic episodes alternating without a real free interval (i.e., an interval of at least one month, without significant mood symptoms); and 4) irregular course of cycle se...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Antonio Tundo, Franco De Crescenzo, Davide Gori, Paola Cavalieri Tags: Review article Source Type: research

OpenSIMPLe: A real-world implementation feasibility study of a smartphone-based psychoeducation programme for bipolar disorder
THE HIGH PREVALENCE OF MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS IN COMPARISON TO THE LIMITED AVAILABILITY OF TRADITIONAL HEALTHCARE RESOURCES HAS LED TO AN INCREASING INTEREST IN NEW COST-EFFECTIVE METHODS WHICH COULD MEET THIS GROWING DEMAND AND BURDEN (KESSLER ET AL., 2007; WHITEFORD ET AL., 2013). GIVEN THEIR GROWING, UBIQUITOUS AND BROAD ACCESSIBILITY, INTERNET-BASED PLATFORMS (IBP) HAVE FREQUENTLY BEEN PROPOSED AS A POTENTIAL SOLUTION FOR REACHING WIDER POPULATIONS AND INCREASING LARGE-SCALE AVAILABILITY OF HEALTH SERVICES, WHILE SIMULTANEOUSLY REDUCING COSTS. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Diego Hidalgo-Mazzei, Mar ía Reinares, Ainoa Mateu, Viktoriya L Nikolova, Caterina del Mar Bonnín, Ludovic Samalin, Aitana García-Estela, Víctor Pérez-Solá, Allan H. Young, Sergio Strejilevich, Eduard Vieta, Francesc Colom Source Type: research

Depressive mood and circadian rhythms disturbances as outcomes of seasonal affective disorder treatment: A systematic review
Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a recurrent illness affecting around 5% of the population at temperate latitudes (Rosenthal et  al., 1984; Lewy et al., 2009). Most frequently, patients experience depressive symptoms during fall and winter, with full remission to normal mood or switch into hypo/mania during spring and summer (Lam et al., 1995; Zauderer and Ganzer, 2015). This predominant manifestation of SAD is called win ter depression (Magnusson and Boivin, 2003). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Giulia Menculini, Norma Verdolini, Andrea Murru, Isabella Pacchiarotti, Umberto Volpe, Antonella Cervino, Luca Steardo, Patrizia Moretti, Eduard Vieta, Alfonso Tortorella Source Type: research

Proximally-Occurring Life Events and the First Transition from Suicidal Ideation to Suicide Attempt in Adolescents
Suicide is currently the third leading cause of death in U.S. adolescents (Centers  for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 2017). Risk for death by suicide is often conceptualized as occurring on a continuum of severity from passive death wishes to suicidal ideation, planning, and attempt, with a prior suicide attempt being the most robust risk factor for suicide death (Ribeiro et al., 2016). Because only approximately one-third of adolescents who have thought about suicide will progress to a suicide attempt, increasing attention has been paid t...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Elise Paul Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Toward a Very Brief Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire
Changes in the nine criterion symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD) are the primary metric to gauge the efficacy of antidepressant medications and other treatments. Symptomatic remission remains the preferred outcome of acute-phase treatment (Bauer et al., 2013; Cleare et al., 2015; Gelenberg et al., 2010; Kennedy et al., 2016; Rush et al., 2006b) (because remission is associated with a better long-term prognosis (lower risk of relapse) (Rush et al., 2006c) and better day-to-day function (Bauer et al., 2013; Miller et al., 1998; Trivedi et al., 2009) than either response (>50% reduction from baseline) without remi...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 14, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: A. John Rush, Charles C. South, Manish K. Jha, Bruce D. Grannemann, Madhukar H. Trivedi Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Gender-specific study of recurrent suicide attempts in outpatients with multiple substance use disorders
Suicide is a leading cause of premature death worldwide (World Health Organization, 2015). Psychiatric disorders have consistently been involved in increasing the risk for suicide attempts (SA) (World Health Organization, 2015), especially SUDs (Darvishi et al., 2015; Poorolajal et al., 2016), including tobacco use disorder (Poorolajal and Darvishi, 2016). Characterizing the different suicidal phenotypes, which encompass a broad range of symptoms, and their specific risk factors is of utmost relevance for both clinical (Tiet et al., 2006) and research purposes (Oquendo, 2016). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: R. Icick, F. Vorspan, E. Karsinti, K. Ksouda, J-P. L épine, G. Brousse, S. Mouly, F. Bellivier, V. Bloch Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Applications of machine learning algorithms to predict therapeutic outcomes in depression: a meta-analysis and systematic review
The functional and psychosocial deficits associated with depression are pervasive, often chronic, progressive, and highly disabling (Vigo et  al., 2016). The Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) trial reported that patients who remit with the first trial of an antidepressant experience significant reductions in work-related disability; in contrast, patients who remit with subsequent treatment trials or strateg ies exhibit residual functional impairments (Trivedi et al., 2013). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Yena Lee, Renee-Marie Ragguett, Rodrigo B. Mansur, Justin J. Boutilier, Joshua D. Rosenblat, Alisson Trevizol, Elisa Brietzke, Kangguang Lin, Zihang Pan, Mehala Subramaniapillai, Timothy C.Y. Chan, Dominika Fus, Caroline Park, Natalie Musial, Hannah Zucke Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Prevalence, treatment, and the correlates of common mental disorders in the mid 2010 ’s in Japan: The results of the World Mental Health Japan 2nd Survey
Mental disorders have been shown to be one of the main causes of nonfatal burden, with the percentage of the number of years lived with disability increasing from 2005 to 2015 (GBD 2015 DALYs and HALE Collaborators, 2016; GBD 2015 Disease and Injury Incidence and Prevalence Collaborators, 2016). However, the need for the treatment of mental disorders is still unmet (Thornicroft et  al., 2017; Wang et al., 2007). The World Health Organization (WHO) World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Consortium and other previous studies have reported a high prevalence of mental disorders worldwide, although they found a comparativel...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Hanako Ishikawa, Hisateru Tachimori, Tadashi Takeshima, Maki Umeda, Karin Miyamoto, Haruki Shimoda, Toshiaki Baba, Norito Kawakami Source Type: research

Affective instability in those with and without mental disorders: a case control study
Affective Instability (AI) is a transdiagnostic symptom (Broome et  al., 2015b; Henry et al., 2001b). It has been defined as rapid oscillations of intense affect, with difficulty regulating these or their behavioural consequences (Marwaha, 2013). Multiple strands of evidence have associated AI with suicidal thinking (Palmier-Claus et al., 2012; Yen et al., 2004 ), health service use (Marwaha et al., 2013c), new onset of depression (Marwaha et al., 2015), psychotic symptoms (Marwaha et al., 2013a), onset of bipolar disorder and increasing time to recovery (Howes et al.,...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Steven Marwaha, Charlotte Price, Jan Scott, Scott Weich, Aimee Cairns, Jeremy Dale, Catherine Winsper, Matthew R. Broome Source Type: research

Narcissistic Traits and Self-Esteem in Children: Results from a Community and a Clinical Sample of Patients with Oppositional Defiant Disorder
Narcissism, in its extreme form, is a personality disorder, characterized by an exaggerated sense of self-importance and uniqueness, an unreasonable sense of entitlement, a craving for admiration and attention, exploitative tendencies toward other people, and arrogance (American  Psychiatric Association, 2013). However, recent research has focused on narcissism as a dimensional trait. One of the most influential models of interpreting narcissism as a personality dimension is the dynamic self-regulatory processing model (Morf and Rhodewalt, 2001). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Pietro Muratori, Annarita Milone, Paola Brovedani, Valentina Levantini, Gabriele Melli, Simone Pisano, Elena Valente, Sander Thomaes, Gabriele Masi Source Type: research

Capacity to Provide Informed Consent among Adults with Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar disorder is a major psychiatric disorder that is defined by the occurrence of mania that typically also experiences episodes of depression (Fountoulakis  et al, 2007). In the United States, the lifetime prevalence estimate of bipolar I disorder is 1.1% (Kleinman et al, 2003), with an estimated annual cost of $45 billion (Merikangas et al, 2007). Several studies have noted episode-related decrements in cognitive function (Denicoff et al,  1999), which may affect the ability of these patients to provide informed consent to participate in research. (Source: J...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Christina C. Klein, Michelle B. Jolson, Meg Lazarus, Brian Masterson, Thomas J. Blom, Caleb M. Adler, Melissa P. DelBello, Stephen M. Strakowski Source Type: research

Effects of maternal anxiety and depression on fetal neuro-development
Maternal stress, anxiety and depression have been shown to directly affect fetal development, such as increasing arousal and influencing cortical processes (Kinsella& Monk,  2009). Specifically, maternal prenatal anxiety has been related to fetal movements (Kaitz, Mankuta, Rokem& Faraone, 2016) and to increased postnatal risk for neuro developmental disorders (Kinsella& Monk, 2009; Glover, 2011; 2015; Sheridan, et  al 2008, 2010). Some research indicates that both maternal anxiety and depression are co-morbid and one might influence the other. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: N. Reissland, S. Froggatt, E. Reames, J. Girkin Source Type: research

The Effect of Pharmacogenomic Testing on Response and Remission Rates in the Acute Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent and disabling mental illness affecting more than 350 million people globally as the leading cause of disability worldwide (WHO, 2017). Depression treatment guidelines recommend the use of evidence-based antidepressants in the acute treatment of moderate to severe depression (Kennedy et al., 2016; McIntyre, 2015). Evidence-based treatments are identified through randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the clinical efficacy, safety and tolerability of new treatments. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Joshua D. Rosenblat, Yena Lee, Roger S. McIntyre Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Relationship of depression, chronic disease, self-rated health, and gender with health care utilization among community-living elderly
Depression and chronic illness are very common health conditions in older people (Kok and Reynolds, 2017; Wolff et  al., 2002). They are strongly correlated with each other (Fiske et al., 2009) and cause substantial functional impairment and other detrimental effects on the quality of life of those affected (Blazer, 2003; Sprangers et al., 2000). Both conditions also create a significant socioeconomic burden , which is partially mediated by an increase in physician visits and frequency and duration of hospitalizations among the elderly (Katon et al., 2003; Murray et al., 2012). (Source: Journa...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Kyu-Man Han, Young-Hoon Ko, Ho-Kyoung Yoon, Changsu Han, Byung-Joo Ham, Yong-Ku Kim Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Major Depressive Episodes and Mortality in the Canadian Household Population
Major depressive disorder is associated with increased all-cause mortality, but the strength of this association depends strongly on study design and covariate adjustments made in the individual studies. For example, an early review (Wulsin et al., 1999) noted that studies comparing patients hospitalized for depression to members of the general population (with adjustment for age and sex) have tended to find strongly elevated mortality ratios (on average 2.7) whereas studies of community samples have found weaker effects, in the range of 1.2 to 1.7. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Scott B. Patten, Jeanne VA Williams, Andrew GM Bulloch Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Understanding suicide: Focusing on its mechanisms through a lithium lens
A global target of 10% reduction in suicide by 2020 and 50% by 2023 has been set by the World Health Organisation (WHO; World  Health Organization, 2014) because, despite concerted, multifaceted efforts, the rate of reduction in suicide has been dishearteningly slow. Part of the reason for this is the complexity of suicide and its multifactorial aetiology. Hence, a deeper understanding of its underlying mechanisms and th e processes that drive suicidal behaviour is crucial for the development of effective preventative strategies. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 13, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Gin S Malhi, Pritha Das, Tim Outhred, Lauren Irwin, Grace Morris, Amber Hamilton, Katie Lynch, Zola Mannie Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Estimated prevalence and associated risk factors of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) among medical college students in a Chinese population
Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is an early-onset neurodevelopmental disorder (Clauss-Ehlers, 2010; Sroubek et  al., 2013). It features the symptoms of attention deficit, excessive activity, or difficulty in controlling age-inappropriate behaviors (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). A formal diagnosis of ADHD meets these criteria: symptoms occur before twelve years of age, persist for more than six months, and cause functional impairments in at least two settings (such as school, home, or community) (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 12, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Yanmei Shen, Bella Siu Man Chan, Jianbo Liu, Fanchao Meng, Tingyu Yang, Yuqiong He, Jianping Lu, Xuerong Luo, Xiang Yang Zhang Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The role of optimism in the relationship between job stress and depressive symptoms. Longitudinal findings from the German Ageing Survey
Stress, and in particular job stress, is a psychological issue and a widespread phenomenon caused by work characteristics as well as personal characteristics which leads to adverse health outcomes (Shields, 2006, Iacovides et al., 2003). Stress outcomes like fatigue, heart disease, depression, diabetes and burnout were discussed in previous literature (Cohen and Herbert, 1996, Iacovides et al., 2003, Melchior et al., 2007). Special emphasis is put on depressive disorders because estimations showed that over the course of one year about 8.9% of the working population aged 15 to 65 in Germany fulfill all criteria for a depre...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 11, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: E.V. Romswinkel, H.-H. K önig, A. Hajek Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Treating a broader range of depressed adolescents with combined therapy
Among young people, major depression accounts for a substantial portion of the burden of disease (Gore et  al., 2011; Merikangas et al., 2010). Furthermore, depression has a variety of adverse effects, both immediately and in adulthood. In particular, depression during adolescence is associated with an increased risk for depression and other psychopathology in adulthood (Fergusson and Woodward, 2002; Jones, 2013; Rutter et al., 2006); an increased risk for self-harm and suicidal behaviors (Fergusson and Woodward, 2002; Gould et al., 1998; Hawton et al., 2012; Thapar et al., 2012); an increased...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 11, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Simon Foster, Prof. Meichun Mohler-Kuo Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Cerebral Blood Flow in Bipolar Disorder: A Systematic Review
Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a severe chronic impairing condition whose burden is associated with recurrent mood episodes, neurocognitive dysfunction as well as psychiatric comorbidity such as anxiety and substance use disorder(Grande et al., 2016). Despite an increased risk of suicide, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in BD, with a mortality rate ratio of over two and an occurrence of mortality over ten years earlier than in the general population(Schaffer et al., 2015; Westman et al., 2013). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 11, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Simina Toma, Bradley J. MacIntosh, Walter Swardfager, Benjamin I. Goldstein Source Type: research

Abnormal metabolite concentrations and amygdala volume in patients with recent-onset posttraumatic stress disorder
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder affecting people who are exposed to extraordinary distress events, whose main symptoms are reliving the traumatic event, avoiding trauma-related cues, negative alterations in thinking and feeling, and hyperarousal (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The lifetime prevalence of PTSD is reported as 2% to 9% (Bisson et al., 2015). Patients with PTSD are at increased risk of suicide, which is as high as 13% in one study of 431 veterans (Jakupcak et al., 2010; Sareen et al., 2007). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 11, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Xiaorui Su, Chunchao Xia, Weina Wang, Huaiqiang Sun, Qiaoyue Tan, Simin Zhang, LingJiang Li, Graham J. Kemp, Qiang Yue, Qiyong Gong Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

High Risk of Depression, Anxiety, and Poor Quality of Life among Experienced Fathers, But Not Mothers: A Prospective Longitudinal Study
Adapting to drastic changes in the biological, psychological, and social domains during pregnancy and postpartum periods increases the risk of psychological difficulties, including depression and anxiety, in women (O'Hara  and Wisner, 2014). Transitioning to fatherhood may also cause stress in men throughout the perinatal period (Garfield et al., 2006), thus leading to depression and anxiety, with patterns similar to those observed in women (Teixeira et al., 2009; Wang and Chen, 2006). Whereas depression affects 17.2% of women during pregnancy and 13.1% during postpartum periods (Underwood et&...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 11, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Yi-Han Chen, Jian-Pei Huang, Heng-Kien Au, Yi-Hua Chen Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 10, 2018 Category: Neurology Source Type: research

Farming habit, light exposure, physical activity, and depressive symptoms. A Cross-Sectional Study of the HEIJO-KYO Cohort
Over 10% of the population experiences major depression at some point during their lifespans, according to a cross-national comparison among 18 countries with high incomes (14.5%) and low to middle-incomes (11.1%) (Kessler  and Bromet, 2013). Depression is an important risk factor related to suicide (Nordentoft et al., 2011) and cardiovascular disease (Batelaan et al., 2016; Musselman et al., 1998). In addition, depression causes the largest non-fatal burden, according to the Global Burden of Disease study in 20 00 (Ustun et al., 2004). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 10, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Yuji Asai, Kenji Obayashi, Masataka Oume, Moe Ogura, Katsuya Takeuchi, Yuki Yamagami, Yoshiaki Tai, Norio Kurumatani, Keigo Saeki Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Repetitive negative thinking as a predictor of depression and anxiety: A longitudinal cohort study
Repetitive, prolonged, and recurrent thought (such as worry, rumination, reflection, and problem solving) is part of the human condition and can have both unconstructive and constructive consequences (see Watkins (2008) for an extensive overview). Unconstructive repetitive negative thinking as related to emotional problems has been defined as a style of thinking about one's problems or negative experiences that is repetitive, intrusive, and difficult to disengage from (Ehring and Watkins, 2008; Watkins, 2008). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 10, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Philip Spinhoven, Albert M. van Hemert, Brenda W. Penninx Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

A review of the neurobiological underpinning of comorbid substance use and mood disorders
There have been previous attempts to describe models that could explain the interrelationship between substance use (SUDs) and mood disorders. However, the neurobiological basis of these dual diagnoses remains unclear. Four predominant hypotheses assist in explaining the interrelationship. The self-medication hypothesis considers drug use to be the result of an attempt to alleviate pre-existing symptoms of a mental disorder (Markou et al., 1998, Khantzian, 1985); while a second hypothesis argues that repeated drug administration leads to a neuronal adaptation in brain areas mediating mental illness (McEwen, 2000, Markou et...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 10, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Nieves G ómez-Coronado, Rickinder Sethi, Chiara Cristina Bortolasci, Lauren Arancini, Michael Berk, Seetal Dodd Source Type: research

Lithium-associated anterior cingulate neurometabolic profile in euthymic bipolar i disorder: a 1h-mrs study
The neurobiology of bipolar disorder (BD) has not been fully elucidated, although some part of the knowledge about its neurobiology has emerged from studies on lithium's mechanism of action as a first-line mood stabilizer (Yatham et al., 2013). Modern neuroimaging techniques, such as proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), allow in vivo measurement of three non-glutamatergic brain metabolites implicated in both the neurobiology of BD and lithium ´s mechanisms of action: N-acetylaspartate (NAA) (a neuronal marker), Myo-Inositol (mI) (a glia cell marker) and Choline (Cho) (a membrane cell marker) (Berridge, 19...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 10, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Marcio Gerhardt Soeiro-de-Souza, Maria Concepcion Garcia Otaduy, Rodrigo Machado-Vieira, Ricardo Alberto Moreno, Fabiano G. Nery, Claudia Leite, Beny Lafer Source Type: research

Sense of Coherence, Burden and Mental Health in Caregiving: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Increasing life expectancy and current trends in population aging is leading to higher levels of dependency for older people through a rise of disabilities leading to increases in care and resources to meet care demands (OECD, 2013). Most of this care is delivered by unpaid carers generally women, referred to in the literature as informal carers (Del-Pino-Casado et al., 2011). Caring for a dependent person has negative effects on carers ’ physical and psychological health, and is associated with high levels of subjective burden, posing carers at increased risk of experiencing clinically significant symptoms of depres...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Rafael del-Pino-Casado, A ída Espinosa-Medina, Catalina López-Martínez, Vasiliki Orgeta Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Mental health and psychosocial problems among Chinese left-behind children: a cross-sectional comparative study
The past three decades of modernization and urbanization in China have created a surge of migrant laborers, with increasing numbers of young adults and couples migrating from rural areas to find work in large cities, usually far from their hometowns. These adults usually do not take their children with them because of high living costs and barriers to educational services and medical care. This phenomenon has created large numbers of children who have been left behind(LBC) in the care of one parent, relative or others while the other parent or both parents become migrant workers(Ye and Murray, 2005). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Wanjie Tang, Gang Wang, Tao Hu, Qian Dai, Jiajun Xu, Yanchun Yang, Jiuping Xu Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The cost-utility of stepped-care algorithms according to depression guideline recommendations – results of a state-transition model analysis
Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) diminishes quality of life and is associated with functional impairment, which has a tremendous impact on individuals, their relatives and society. In view of its high prevalence, MDD is costly from both a health care and a societal perspective (Ferrari et  al, 2013; Chisholm et al, 2016). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Jolanda A.C. Meeuwissen, Talitha L. Feenstra, Filip Smit, Matthijs Blankers, Jan Spijker, Claudi L.H. Bockting, Anton J.L.M. van Balkom, Erik Buskens Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Daytime Midpoint as a Digital Biomarker for Chronotype in Bipolar Disorder
Sleep disturbance is a pervasive and persistent phenomenon in bipolar disorder (BD), experienced by between 70-99% of BD patients (Harvey, Talbot,& Gershon, 2009). Abnormalities in sleep quality, as well as circadian rhythm irregularities, may be markers of current or imminent manic or depressive episodes (Cretu, Culver, Goffin, Shah,& Ketter, 2016; Gershon et al., 2017; Perlman, Johnson,& Mellman, 2006), or future positive or negative affect (Kaufmann, Gershon, Eyler,& Depp, 2016), and therefore are important markers for monitoring BD course and treatment progress. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Christopher N. Kaufmann, Anda Gershon, Colin A. Depp, Shefali Miller, Jamie M. Zeitzer, Terence A. Ketter Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Low brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in post-mortem brains of older adults with depression and dementia in a large clinicopathological sample.
Depression in older adults is a heterogeneous disorder with complex and multiple pathogenic mechanisms. Many studies have explored the vascular component of depression in older adults (Aizenstein et al., 2016). In contrast, few studies on the basis of the neurotrophin hypothesis, which is one of the main hypotheses of adult depression at the present day, have been conducted in older persons with depression. These few studies focused mostly on peripheral measurements of neurotrophins (Hashizume et al., 2015). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Paula Villela Nunes, Camila Fernandes Nascimento, Helena Kyunghee Kim, Ana Cristina Andreazza, Helena Paula Brentani, Claudia Kimie Suemoto, Renata Elaine Paraizo Leite, Renata Eloah de Lucena Ferretti-Rebustini, Carlos Augusto Pasqualucci, Ricardo Nitrin Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Naturally absorbed polyunsaturated fatty acids, lithium, and suicide-related behaviors: a case-controlled study
Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (omega-3 fatty acids) have been reported to be effective for depression (Grosso et  al., 2016; Sarris et al., 2016; Hallahan et al., 2016; Bloch and Hannestad, 2012; Lin et al., 2010), with studies favoring EPA rather than DHA as more effective (Sarris et al., 2016; Hallahan et al., 2016; Martins, 2009). However, the effects of omega-3 fatty acids on suicide appear to be inc onclusive (Pompili et al., 2017) because large epidemiological studies (Poudel-Tandukar et al., 2011; Tsai et al., 2014) have shown no supporti...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Keiko Kurosawa, Takeshi Terao, Masayuki Kanehisa, Ippei Shiotsuki, Nobuyoshi Ishii, Ryuichi Takenaka, Teruo Sakamoto, Takehisa Matsukawa, Kazuhito Yokoyama, Shuntaro Ando, Atsushi Nishida, Yutaka Matsuoka Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Habenular Connectivity May Predict Treatment Response in Depressed Psychiatric Inpatients
The habenula (Hb) is a diencephalic structure bilaterally positioned on either side of the third ventricle. It is composed of paired nuclei —medial and lateral—which differ in several characteristics including afferent/efferent connectivity (Klemm, 2004) and transcriptome (Lein et al., 2007). The nuclei receive inputs largely through the stria medullaris from the limbic-forebrain and basal ganglia and they project their output th rough the fasciculus retroflexus to several brainstem nuclei (Bianco and Wilson, 2009; Hikosaka et al., 2008; Omelchenko et al., 2009; Sesack and Grace, 2010)....
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Savannah N. Gosnell, Kaylah N. Curtis, Kenia Velasquez, J. Christopher Fowler, Alok Madan, Wayne Goodman, Ramiro Salas Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Older Men with Bipolar Disorder Diagnosed in Early and Later Life: Physical Health Morbidity and General Hospital Service Use
Bipolar disorder (BD) is a disabling episodic mental health disorder that is associated with increased morbidity and premature mortality (Crump et al., 2013). This excess morbidity and mortality not only persists but might become more pronounced in old age (Almeida et al., 2016b), raising concerns about the potential impact of BD on health services as the population ages. The Clinical and Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness for Bipolar Disorder (Bipolar CHOICE) found that 96% of 482 participants had at least one other medical comorbidity, with cardiometabolic diseases becoming more prevalent with increa...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 9, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Osvaldo P. Almeida, Graeme J. Hankey, Bu B. Yeap, Jonathan Golledge, Leon Flicker Source Type: research

Depressive vulnerability in women with Alzheimer's disease: Relationship with personality traits and abnormal personality dimensions
Personality changes in AD have been documented in the literature and may constitute a useful early clinical marker of Dementia (e.g., Cipriani, Borin, Del Debbio,& Di Fiorino, 2015; Duberstein et al., 2010; Duchek et al., 2007; Henriques-Calado, Duarte-Silva,& Sousa Ferreira, 2016; Pocnet, Rossier, Antonietti,& von Gunten, 2011, 2013; Wahlin& Byrne, 2011). Within this field, the most robust and validated personality evaluation measure is based on the Five-Factor Model of Personality. The overall common objective is to understand personality changes in Dementia by comparing the pre-morbid and current measure...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 8, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Joana Henriques-Calado, Maria Eug énia Duarte-Silva, Ana Sousa Ferreira Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

The relation between empathy and depressive symptoms in a Dutch population sample
Impairments in social functioning are common in individuals with (sub)clinical levels of depression (Hirschfeld et al., 2000; Kessler et al., 2003), and may persist after remission of a depressive episode (Burcusa and Iacono, 2007). Social functioning impairments not only precede depression (Verboom et al., 2014), but also prevent the occurrence of positive interactions with others that might help mitigate stressful periods (Oshri et al., 2017). Enduring impairments in social functioning likely contribute to the recurrent and sometimes chronic nature of depression. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 8, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Elise C. Bennik, Bertus F. Jeronimus, Marije aan het Rot Source Type: research

Course of subthreshold depression into a depressive disorder and its risk factors
Subthreshold depression is generally considered present when individuals report clinically relevant depressive symptoms (i.e. depressed mood or loss of interest) but diagnostic criteria for a fully developed depressive disorder are not met (Rodr íguez et al., 2012). Population-based studies on subthreshold depression have come up with a wide range of prevalence rates (1.4-17.2%). This is probably due to varying definitions of subthreshold depression (i.e. requiring a varying number of symptoms and/or a different minimum duration of the sym ptoms), recency of the symptomatology (i.e. (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 8, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Marlous Tuithof, Margreet ten Have, Saskia van Dorsselaer, Marloes Kleinjan, Aartjan Beekman, Ron de Graaf Tags: Research paper Source Type: research

Psychosocial Profiles of Adolescents from Dissolved Families: Differences in Depressive Symptoms in Emerging Adulthood
Family dissolution, caused by parental separation or divorce, is consistently associated with negative outcomes for young people (see meta-analyses Amato, 2001; Amato& Keith, 1991). Common among findings is increased risk for subsequent depression (Culpin, Heron, Araya, Melotti,& Joinson, 2013; Oldehinkel, Ormel, Veenstra, De Winter,& Verholst, 2008). However, a substantial proportion of individuals from dissolved families do not experience depressive symptoms, or symptom increases are transient or modest in effect (Kessler et al., 2010; Ruschena, Prior, Sanson,& Smart, 2005). (Source: Journal of Affective Disorders)
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 8, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Laura Di Manno, Jacqui A. Macdonald, George J. Youssef, Keriann Little, Craig A. Olsson Source Type: research

Psychosocial factors associated with symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress among single mothers with young children: A population-based study
The trend of single parent households has increased substantially over the past few decades and is anticipated to rise (OECD, 2011). Approximately 20% of German families in 2013 with a dependent child were headed by a single parent compared to 14% in 1996 and over 90% of such households are fronted by mothers (Statistisches Bundesamt, 2013). Similar trends are also found in other neighbouring countries such as the United Kingdom and Scandinavia (Chzhen and Bradshaw, 2012). Poorer health outcomes among single parents compared to partnered parents have been demonstrated consistently in the literature, with significantly incr...
Source: Journal of Affective Disorders - August 8, 2018 Category: Neurology Authors: Linda A. Liang, Ursula Berger, Christian Brand Tags: Research paper Source Type: research