Bioarchaeological reconstruction of physiological stress during social transition in Albania
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Britney Kyle, Eduard Shehi, Marlon Koçi, Laurie J. Reitsema (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - July 10, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

A case of dwarfism in 6th century Italy: Bioarchaeological assessment of a hereditary disorder
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Mirko Traversari, Silvia Da Via, Enrico Petrella, Robin N.M. Feeney, Stefano Benazzi (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - July 2, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

A new approach to recording nasal fracture in skeletonized individuals
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Bruno M. Magalhães, Simon Mays, Ana Luisa Santos (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - July 1, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Syphilis in an Italian medieval jewish community: A bioarchaeological and cultural perspective
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Pietrobelli Annalisa, Mariotti Valentina, Fusari Samantha, Gasparini Anthony, Bettuzzi Matteo, Morigi Maria Pia, Belcastro Maria Giovanna (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - June 20, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

External auditory exostoses and early Neolithic aquatic resource procurement in Cyprus: Results from Cypro-PPNB Kissonerga-Mylouthkia in regional context
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Kirsi O. Lorentz (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - June 20, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: June 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 29Author(s): (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - June 16, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Two probable cases of mastoiditis in a cemetery from the Warring States to Han Dynasty (475 BCE–220 CE) in Qufu, Shandong Province, China
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Xiaowen Zhang, Yongsheng Zhao, Yueming Niu, Zimeng Wang, Wen Zeng (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - June 6, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Linking isotope analysis and paleopathology: An andean perspective
Publication date: Available online 4 June 2020Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): J. Marla Toyne, Bethany L. Turner (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - June 5, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Oral pathological conditions of an Early Epipaleolithic human from Southwest Asia: Ohalo II H2 as a probable case of intentional dental ablation
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): John C. Willman, Sarah A. Lacy (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - May 31, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Identification of working reindeer using palaeopathology and entheseal changes
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Anna-Kaisa Salmi, Sirpa Niinimäki, Tuula Pudas (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - May 27, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Severe skeletal lesions, osteopenia and growth deficit in a child with pulmonary tuberculosis (mid-20th century, Portugal)
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Ellie Gooderham, Luísa Marinho, Laure Spake, Shera Fisk, Carlos Prates, Sandra Sousa, Carlos Oliveira, Ana Luisa Santos, Hugo F.V. Cardoso (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - May 27, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Examining variation in skeletal tuberculosis in a late pre-contact population from the eastern mountains of Peru
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): J. Marla Toyne, Nathan Esplin, Jane E. Buikstra (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - May 21, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Multiple occurrence of premature polyarticular osteoarthritis in an early medieval Bohemian cemetery (Prague, Czech Republic)
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Sylva Drtikolová Kaupová, Petr Velemínský, Jan Cvrček, Valér Džupa, Vítězslav Kuželka, Marek Laboš, Alena Němečková, Kateřina Tomková, Eliška Zazvonilová, Sacha Kacki (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - May 21, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and hip fracture: A case study from the Terry collection
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Brianne Morgan, Madeleine Mant, Carlina de la Cova, Megan B. Brickley (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - May 9, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

An introduction to advances in Andean South American paleopathology
Publication date: Available online 22 April 2020Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): J. Marla Toyne, Melissa S. Murphy, Haagen D. Klaus (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - April 24, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Treponematosis in a pre-Columbian hunter-gatherer male from Antofagasta (1830 ± 20 BP, Northern Coast of Chile)
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): Mario Castro, Aryel Pacheco, Ivo Kuzmanic, Alejandro Clarot, Pablo Díaz (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - March 6, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Microstructural analysis of bony alterations in a historic case of actinomycosis
Publication date: September 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 30Author(s): D. Schamall, E. Nebot Valenzuela, P. Pietschmann, S. Tangl, M. Edelmayer, T. Dobsak, M. Teschler-Nicola (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - February 27, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: March 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 28Author(s): (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - February 18, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Multi-proxy stable isotope analyses of dentine microsections reveal diachronic changes in life history adaptations, mobility, and tuberculosis-induced wasting in prehistoric Liguria (Finale Ligure, Italy, northwestern Mediterranean)
ConclusionsShortening in weaning patterns during the Metal Ages are likely driven by the intensification of agricultural practices and cultivation of new crops during Bronze and Iron Ages. Neolithic food choices and delayed weaning patterns may represent one of the strategies to maximize growth and immune potential in a local economy/ecology with high-infectious load. Tuberculosis was a chronic and long-lasting disease.SignificanceThe first combined carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur analysis on prehistoric dentine microsections revealing changing human life history adaptations within the same region.LimitationsSmall sample size...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - February 8, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Sensationalism and speaking to the public: Scientific rigour and interdisciplinary collaborations in palaeopathology
ConclusionsAlthough most high profile publications involving analysis of archaeological human remains are methodologically sound and well interpreted, others have suffered from poor scientific rigour stemming from an apparent lack of awareness of anthropological methods and ethics. When these publications are highlighted by the press, sensationalistic narratives are perpetuated which may reflect poorly on our discipline and give the public unrealistic expectations about our work.Suggestions for future researchWe suggest that best practice in high-profile paleopathological research include recruitment of a range of authors ...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - February 5, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Paleopathological research in continental China: Introduction to the Special Issue
Publication date: March 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 28Author(s): Elizabeth Berger, Kate PechenkinaAbstractWe set out to assemble this Special Issue of IJPP with three goals in mind: (1) to familiarize Anglophone readers with research on paleopathology conducted by Chinese scholars; (2) to enhance interest in paleopathological research among Chinese scholars, and to foster the use of differential diagnosis as the key mode of paleopathological analysis; and (3) to initiate integration of pathological analysis of human skeletal collections with historical records documenting early medical pract...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - February 5, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Ankylosis of a knee joint from Medieval London: Trauma, congenital anomaly or osteoarthritis?
ConclusionsIn all probability, the left knee reflects a case of congenital ankylosis with a differential diagnosis of subadult trauma. The female’s skeleton had adapted to the impairment. Their risk is likely to have been elevated because of climatic and pandemic events during this period.SignificanceFirst reported case of congenital knee ankylosis.LimitationsThe left knee joint was damaged during excavation.Suggestions for further researchAdditional imaging is advised. (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 24, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “A bioarchaeological and biocultural investigation of Chinese footbinding at the Xuecun archaeological site, Henan Province, China” [Int. J. Paleopathol. 25 (2019) 9–19]
Publication date: Available online 22 January 2020Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): Christine Lee (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 24, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Advances in the molecular detection of tuberculosis in pre-contact Andean South America
Publication date: Available online 20 January 2020Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): Elizabeth A. Nelson, Jane E. Buikstra, Alexander Herbig, Tiffiny A. Tung, Kirsten I. BosAbstractAndean paleopathological research has significantly enhanced knowledge about the geographical distribution and evolution of tuberculosis (TB) in pre-Columbian South America. In this paper, we review the history and progress of research on ancient tuberculosis (TB) in the Andean region, focusing on the strengths and limitations of current approaches for the molecular detection of ancient pathogens, with special attention to...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 22, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Back to the beginning: Identifying lesions of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis prior to vertebral ankylosis
ConclusionsSmall isolated outgrowths represent the earliest stages of the spinal manifestations of DISH. The use of ESM as an indicator of DISH should be undertaken with great caution until the relationship between these two features is understood.SignificanceImproved accuracy of paleopathological diagnostic criteria of DISH.LimitationsSmall sample comprised of only individuals with DISH.Future researchmicro-CT analysis to investigate the internal structure of the spinal lesions. Analysis of extra-spinal enthesophytes in individuals with and without DISH to understand their pathogenesis and association with the spinal lesi...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 15, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Osteological characteristics of Chinese foot-binding in archaeological remains
Publication date: March 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 28Author(s): Yongsheng Zhao, Lin Guo, Yuni Xiao, Yueming Niu, Xiaowen Zhang, Deliang He, Wen ZengAbstractFoot-binding was a widespread custom in China for hundreds of years, though the severity and type of binding varied considerably over time and space. To examine the morphological consequences of extremely severe foot-binding, this paper uses 35 sets of bound and 33 sets of unbound foot bones, from the remains of women excavated from the Xinzhi cemetery in northern Shandong Province. Based on macroscopic observation, CT slices, and measur...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 15, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Differential diagnosis of calcified nodules from a medieval Székely woman in Transylvania
ConclusionsDifferential diagnosis determined the calcified nodules to be consistent with calcified tumors, and most consistent with a calcified leiomyoma with cystic degeneration, potentially uterine.SignificanceThe identification of the calcified nodules as most consistent with calcified uterine leiomyomas adds to the paucity of paleopathological literature on calcified leiomyomas and calcified tumors more broadly. It also allows for an important discussion of the health of women in medieval Transylvania.LimitationsInterpretation would be aided if a more precise origination within the body was known. Careful excavation an...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 9, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Diagnosing tarsal coalition in medieval Exeter
ConclusionsThese frequencies are quite high for clinical imaging estimations, but consistent with other reported archaeological frequencies.SignificanceThis study contributes to known frequencies of tarsal coalition in the past. It also provides descriptive diagnostic criteria for identifying tarsal coalition in archaeological populations.LimitationsPoor preservation of some of the individuals in this sample means that the true frequencies of tarsal coalition may be underrepresented.Suggestions for further researchThis study should be expanded to include more archaeological sites, especially medieval British sites, to dete...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 6, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Environmental correlates of growth patterns in Neolithic Liguria (northwestern Italy)
ConclusionsThe pattern of growth in Ligurian Neolithic children may reflect a deprived and highly-infectious environment: three individuals show skeletal lesions consistent with tuberculosis. The relatively faster growth in infancy may result from the buffering provided by maternal milk. Older children and adolescents may exhibit catch-up growth.SignificanceThis study contributes to our understanding of Neolithic selective pressures and possible biocultural adaptive strategies.LimitationsThe cross-sectional nature of the data and the small sample size make it unclear whether the observed pattern is representative of the gr...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 3, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis at Chelechol ra Orrak, Palau
ConclusionsIndirect effects of parafunctional dental activity appear to be a factor in TMJ-OA frequency at Chelechol ra Orrak. While betel nut chewing may be one of those activities, it does not appear to be solely driving the presence of TMJ-OA.SignificanceThis study highlights the association between a specific parafunctional use of the temporomandibular joint and the potential pathological consequences. It also reinforces the need to carefully evaluate the archaeological context of skeletal remains in order to evaluate specific etiological factors in the presence of TMJ-OA in present and past populations.LimitationsSamp...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 3, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Insights on patterns of developmental disturbances from the analysis of linear enamel hypoplasia in a Neolithic sample from Liguria (northwestern Italy)
ConclusionLEH may reflect life-history in the local ecology of Neolithic Liguria, where several individuals with osteoarticular tuberculosis have been recorded. Disease burden may have triggered developmental disturbances around the time of weaning. Age at first defect was negatively correlated with age at death and positively with the total number of defects, suggesting that early stress may have affected survivorship.SignificanceThe study contributes to the reconstruction of ecological pressures among Neolithic people of Liguria, and informs on environmental challenges during the Neolithic adaptive expansion.LimitationsT...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - January 2, 2020 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Advances in regional paleopathology of the Southern Coast of the Central Andes
Publication date: Available online 19 December 2019Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): Elsa Tomasto-CagigaoAbstractBecause of a rich cultural history and excellent preservation of archaeological materials the south coast of the Central Andes is a region where many anthropological questions can be explored, using the latest methods and techniques. Over the last 20 years, multidisciplinary paleopathological studies have revealed interesting and unanticipated perspectives regarding the lives and cultures of the peoples who inhabited this region in pre-Hispanic times. This paper presents a panorama of the...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - December 21, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Growing up different in Neolithic China: A contextualised case study and differential diagnosis of a young adult with skeletal dysplasia
Publication date: March 2020Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 28Author(s): Siân E. Halcrow, Melanie J. Miller, Anne Marie E. Snoddy, Wenquan Fan, Kate PechenkinaAbstractThis paper presents a case study of a young adult from the late Neolithic Yangshao cultural period site (∼3300–2900 years BC) of Guanjia (关家) located in Henan Province on the Central Plains of China, who has evidence for skeletal dysplasia characterised by proportional stunting of the long bones and a small axial skeleton, generalised osteopenia, and non-fusion of epiphyses. We provide a detailed differential diagno...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - December 14, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Bilateral congenital radioulnar synostosis in an Early Horizon subadult burial from the site of Atalla, Peru
ConclusionsBurial treatment of Individual 1 does not provide any indication that CRUS was afforded an exceptional social significance.Contribution to PaleopathologyThis example of CRUS is notable as it represents the second published archaeological case of CRUS from Peru and the earliest reported case globally.Limitations of this StudyThe osteological sample currently available from this site is limited.Suggestions for Future ResearchIncreased fieldwork in this region is recommended to further clarify the distribution and social significance of CRUS in the prehistoric Andes.ResumenObjetivoEste estudio se llevó a cab...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - December 12, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Editorial Board
Publication date: December 2019Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 27Author(s): (Source: International Journal of Paleopathology)
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - November 22, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Looking back, looking forward: Paleopathology in Andean South America
Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): John W. VeranoAbstractOver the past twenty years, the field of Andean paleopathology has advanced significantly thanks to a new generation of scholars who have been attracted to this region and whose innovative research has expanded our knowledge substantially. The papers in this special issue demonstrate how the field of Andean paleopathology has diversified and grown to become what is today a truly interdisciplinary enterprise involving archaeology, ethnohistory, biological anthropology, geochemistry, medical imag...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - November 16, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Exploring oral paleopathology in the Central Andes: A review
Publication date: Available online 9 November 2019Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): Celeste Marie GagnonAbstractThis targeted review of oral paleopathology in the Central Andes explores research that focuses on a set of interrelated, multifactorial processes: dental caries, macrowear, alveolar abscess, antemortem tooth loss (AMTL), periodontal disease, and the presence of dental calculus. These conditions help characterize oral health because they result from the culturally mediated interaction of individuals’ oral cavity with their external environment. To better understand how osteologists w...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - November 10, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Temporal changes in childhood health during the medieval Little Ice Age in Denmark
This study examines the evidence of three skeletal markers of childhood health that leave permanent observable changes in the adult skeleton during two climate events, the Medieval Warm Period (MWP) and the Little Ice Age (LIA) that occurred in the medieval period (1050–1536 CE).MaterialA total of 241 adult skeletons from the Danish medieval period were included.MethodsLinear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) was examined macroscopically. Harris lines (HL) and infectious middle ear disease (IMED) were examined from CT imaging. The skeletons were segregated by the mortuary pattern of arm position that coincidentally changes bet...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - October 30, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Patterns of trauma across Andean South America: New discoveries and advances in interpretation
Publication date: Available online 23 October 2019Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): Melissa S. Murphy, Sara L. JuengstAbstractIn his review article John W. Verano covered trauma, warfare, trophy taking, and human sacrifice, but his discussion mostly focused on the results of studies of museum or private collections and the recent discovery of the mass human sacrifice from Huaca de la Luna. Due to the renewed interest in the paleopathology of South America, a trend which Verano observed, these types of investigations have grown exponentially in the past twenty years since his initial publication. Her...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - October 24, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Skeletal evidence for violent trauma from the bronze age Qijia culture (2,300-1,500 BCE), Gansu Province, China
Publication date: December 2019Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 27Author(s): Jenna M. Dittmar, Elizabeth Berger, Xiaoya Zhan, Ruilin Mao, Hui Wang, Hui-Yuan YehAbstractThis research explores how social and environmental factors may have contributed to conflict during the early Bronze Age in Northwest China by analyzing violent trauma on human skeletal remains from a cemetery of the Qijia culture (2300-1500 BCE). The Qijia culture existed during a period of dramatic social, technological, and environmental change, though minimal research has been conducted on how these factors may have contributed to ...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - October 11, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Perimortem fracture manifestations and mortality after hip fracture in a documented skeletal series
ConclusionsThis study underscores the importance of examining fracture margins for evidence of hinging. Eburnation may be added to the list of potential perimortem fracture identification criteria.SignificanceIdentifying perimortem trauma unequivocally remains challenging. Using collections with documented perimortem fractures aids in determining which criteria are most likely to appear in archaeological human bone.LimitationsThe fracture location patterning (70% intertrochanteric) may be the result of sample selection.Suggestions for future researchFurther intensive comparative investigation with the Hamann-Todd Collectio...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - October 5, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Paleopathology and children in the Andes: Local/situated biologies and future directions
Publication date: Available online 1 October 2019Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): Deborah E. Blom, Kelly J. KnudsonAbstractIn the decades since Verano (1997) published his foundational piece on Andean paleopathology, scholars have recognized the importance of the bioarchaeology of childhood. Yet, scholarship on ancient childhood in the Andes deemphasizes paleopathology. Nonadult paleopathological data are often employed in large-scale, biocultural studies focused on environmental or political adaptations; however, they can also elucidate children’s individual lived experiences and roles in so...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - October 2, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Perimortem sharp force trauma in an individual from the early medieval cemetery of Säben-Sabiona in South Tyrol, Italy
ConclusionsThe trauma pattern observed indicates that different bladed weapons were used and interpersonal violence rather than a large-scale conflict led to the death of SK63.SignificanceThe present findings provide novel information on violent interpersonal interactions in early medieval Säben-Sabiona, Italy.LimitationsThe sequence of the inflicted injuries was not reconstructed.Suggestions for Further ResearchFuture interdisciplinary investigations (i.e., 3D imaging and reconstructions) will provide a better understanding of the possible types of weapons used to inflict injuries, the required forces to create the l...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - September 25, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Possible interpersonal violence in the Neolithic necropolis of Campo de Hockey (San Fernando, Cádiz, Spain)
ConclusionsThe individuals present signs of interpersonal violence. In both cases, the injuries are perimortem and may have contributed to the deaths of the individuals.SignificanceThe identification of interpersonal violence in the two individuals buried in the tomb, alongside the archaeological context of the burials, provides unique insight into Neolithic burial practices in the Iberian Peninsula and the role that paleopathology can play in the recognition of social complexity.LimitationsThe skeletal remains of the two individuals were fragmented, rendering the identification of perimortem lesions difficult.Suggestions ...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - September 24, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Measuring incremental line width and appearance in the tooth cementum of recent and archaeological human teeth to identify irregularities: First insights using a standardized protocol
ConclusionsIrregular width and appearance in ILs were identified successfully with within-section reproducibility. The moderate reproducibility across sections needs to be addressed in further studies by more systematic sampling of sections.SignificanceThe proposed protocol identifies irregularities in a reproducible manner and may suggest that irregular ILs could be used in paleopathology to identify pregnancies and diseases.LimitationsThe correlation between the identified irregular ILs and known pregnancies has not been assessed as part of this study.Suggestions for further researchThe identified irregular ILs need to b...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - September 22, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

A case study of vertebral fusion in a 19th-century horse from Serbia
ConclusionsPathological changes represent signs of an advanced stage of vertebral fusion consistent with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).SignificanceThis case study provides a clear distinction between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) and other vertebral column diseases in equids. It also presents a new and significant contribution to the nascent discipline of animal paleopathology in present-day Serbia.LimitationsGiven that only 15 thoracic vertebrae were discovered, the impact of this disease on other parts of the horse skeleton remains unknown, as does the archaeological context of the rem...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - September 22, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

A male adult skeleton from the Han Dynasty in Shaanxi, China (202 BC–220 AD) with bone changes that possibly represent spinal tuberculosis
Publication date: December 2019Source: International Journal of Paleopathology, Volume 27Author(s): Mocen Li, Charlotte A. Roberts, Liang Chen, Dongyue ZhaoAbstractBioarchaeological data for tuberculosis (TB) have been published very sporadically in China or the rest of East Asia. To explore the history of TB in this area, 85 skeletons excavated from the Liuwei Cemetery in Shaanxi, China (202 BC–220 AD) were macroscopically examined to record TB related bone changes. These skeletons represented inhabitants of Maolingyi, an urban area that had a high population density during the Han Dynasty (202 BC–220 CE). Sev...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - September 7, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Advances in paleopathology in context: A focus on soft tissue paleopathology
Publication date: Available online 1 September 2019Source: International Journal of PaleopathologyAuthor(s): Kenneth C. NystromAbstractSkeletal and mummified remains from South America have had a significant impact on the progress of paleopathological research. In 1997, John Verano synthesized the state of paleopathological research, identifying trends and highlighting future potentials. The goal of this contribution is to consider Verano’s observations on advances in soft tissue paleopathology within the context of the development of the field of mummy studies. As his article was published near the midpoint between ...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - September 2, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Osteoarthritis, entheses, and long bone cross-sectional geometry in the Andes: Usage, history, and future directions
This article also discusses global clinical and osteological research on ways scholars are currently trying to establish industry-wide methods to evaluate osteoarthritis, entheses, and long bone cross-sectional geometry. Recent studies have focused on rigorous evaluation of methodological techniques, recording protocols, and inter- and intra-observer error problems. Additionally, scholars have focused on physical intensity of movement using biomechanics, evaluated burials of known occupation, and used complex statistical methods to help interpret skeletal changes associated with these conditions. This article also narrows ...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - August 30, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research

Archival, paleopathological and aDNA-based techniques in leprosy research and the case of Father Petrus Donders at the Leprosarium ‘Batavia’, Suriname
ConclusionWe found no evidence that Donders contracted leprosy despite years of intense leprosy contact, but we successfully isolated an archaeological M. leprae aDNA sample from a control skeleton from South America.SignificanceWe successfully genotyped recovered aDNA to a M. leprae strain that likely originated in West Africa. The detected human mitochondrial haplogroup L3 is also associated with this geographical region. This suggests that slave trade contributed to leprosy in Suriname.LimitationsA limited number of skeletons was examined.Suggestions for further researchBroader review of skeletal collections is advised ...
Source: International Journal of Paleopathology - August 18, 2019 Category: Pathology Source Type: research