Children's Adjustment Following Hurricane Katrina: The Role of Primary Caregivers
Hurricane Katrina severely disrupted the lives of many children and families in the central Gulf Coast of the United States. Face‐to‐face interviews with child–caregiver dyads were conducted at approximately 1 year posthurricane (T1) and 6–10 months later (T2). The contribution of several factors—caregiver's self‐reported symptomatology and coping advice and child perceptions of caregiver distress, unavailability, warmth, and caregiver–child conflict—to child‐reported posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and depressive symptoms was examined. Findings provide partial support f...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Virginia Gil‐Rivas, Ryan P. Kilmer Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Trajectories of Psychological Distress Among Low‐Income, Female Survivors of Hurricane Katrina
The purpose of this study was to investigate trajectories of psychological distress among low‐income, primarily unmarried and African American women who survived Hurricane Katrina (N = 386). Data were collected in the year prior to the hurricane as well as approximately 1 and 3 years thereafter. Using Latent Class Growth Analysis (LCGA), we detected 6 distinct trajectory groups. Over half of the participants fit into a trajectory consistent with resilience; that is, they maintained low levels of psychological distress over the course of the study, but experienced an elevation in symptoms at the first predi...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Sarah R. Lowe, Jean E. Rhodes Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Depression in African American Men: A Review of What We Know and Where We Need to Go From Here
We examined and summarized published research focusing on depression among African American men with the goal of identifying prevalence of depression, risk factors, treatment‐seeking behaviors, and treatment‐seeking barriers. In the use of a systematic review, inclusion criteria were studies focused on depression among African American or Black men, separated analysis by race and gender, and conducted in the United States. Each study was critically reviewed to identify depression prevalence, risk factors, treatment‐seeking behaviors, and barriers. Only 19 empirical studies focusing on depression among African America...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Earlise Ward, Maigenete Mengesha Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A Meta‐Analytic Study: The Relationship Between Acculturation and Depression Among Asian Americans
Acculturation is an important and popular cultural research variable among specific ethnic populations that is used to explain the process of assimilating into the host culture. Acculturation has often been used to account for psychosocial changes and health outcomes and has been used to explain health disparities among ethnic groups. Using Asian Americans as an illustrative ethnic group, the authors see that researchers have highlighted the influence of acculturation on health outcomes. Some researchers suggest that this relationship is positive, whereas others postulate that the opposite is true. Because of the highly co...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Arpana Gupta, Frederick Leong, Jeffrey C. Valentine, Dericka D. Canada Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Disentangling Immigrant Status in Mental Health: Psychological Protective and Risk Factors Among Latino and Asian American Immigrants
This study aimed to disentangle the psychological mechanisms underlying immigrant status by testing a model of psychological protective and risk factors to predict the mental health prevalence rates among Latino and Asian American immigrants based on secondary analysis of the National Latino and Asian American Study. The first research question examined differences on the set of protective and risk factors between immigrants and their U.S.‐born counterparts and found that immigrants reported higher levels of ethnic identity, family cohesion, native language proficiency, and limited English proficiency than their U.S.‐b...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Frederick Leong, Yong S. Park, Zornitsa Kalibatseva Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Health for All: The Promise of the Affordable Health Care Act for Racially and Ethnically Diverse Populations
(Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry)
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Robin J. Kimbrough‐Melton Tags: The Community Source Type: research

Can Policy Facilitate Human Capital Development? The Critical Role of Student and Family Engagement in Schools
(Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry)
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Liepa V. Boberiene Tags: The Community Source Type: research

When Agnes Met Alzheimer: The Elderly—A Growing Minority in America
(Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry)
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Adeline G. Levine, Murray Levine Tags: The Community Source Type: research

Does Neighborhood Belonging Matter? Examining School and Neighborhood Belonging as Protective Factors for Latino Adolescents
Across many investigations, school belonging has been linked to several positive outcomes among adolescents, including academic success and psychological well‐being. Based on an ecological framework of child development, this study expands on existing research to explore factors that contribute to adolescents' sense of neighborhood as well as school belonging and investigates how belonging in both contexts is related to Latino adolescents' academic and psychological functioning. Participants consisted of 202 Latino adolescents residing in low‐income, urban neighborhoods. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that n...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Laura K. Maurizi, Rosario Ceballo, Quyen Epstein‐Ngo, Kai S. Cortina Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Getting Them Enrolled Is Only Half the Battle: College Success as a Function of Race or Ethnicity, Gender, and Class
This study examines the gender and racial or ethnic gaps in college grades and graduation of a 1999 freshman cohort of students attending 24 selective predominantly White institutions (PWIs) and the factors that account for observed gaps. The study is guided by the question of whether gender, race or ethnicity, and socioeconomic status combine to affect college outcomes or whether they interact so that outcomes are more positive or adverse for one group than another. Gender gaps were observed for Black and Latino students. For Black students, the gender gap in degree attainment widened once sociodemographic factors were co...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Micere Keels Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Contributions of Family Environment and Parenting Processes to Sexual Risk and Substance Use of Rural African American Males: A 4‐Year Longitudinal Analysis
This study sought to identify factors that forecast sexual risk and alcohol or other substance use patterns among 411 rural African American males as they transitioned from middle childhood to late adolescence. In addition, an exploration was undertaken to examine the contribution of both risk and protective factors in distinguishing rural African American males at highest risk for engaging in risky sexual behavior and elevated substance use from those with relatively low risk of engaging in these behaviors. Findings revealed that exposure to negative life events during middle childhood has prognostic significance for rura...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Velma M. Murry, Ronald L. Simons, Leslie G. Simons, Frederick X. Gibbons Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Stress Mitigation to Promote Development of Prosocial Values and School Engagement of Inner‐City Urban African American and Latino Youth
This study tests a developmental–ecological framework of positive and risky development among a sample of young men of color growing up in high‐risk urban environments. African American and Latino adolescent males (148 African American, 193 Latino) were followed from early to late adolescence. Stress in early adolescence was related to school engagement and prosocial values as well as depressive symptoms and problems assessed 2 years later. The role of family and individual protective factors as direct effects and as mitigating the stress–outcome relation were also tested. Stress predicted problem outcom...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Patrick Tolan, Peter Lovegrove, Eren Clark Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Promotive Peer Contexts of Academic and Social Adjustment Among Rural African American Early Adolescent Boys
This study investigated the social network system of African American early adolescents (N = 237) in rural, low‐wealth schools, specifically in terms of networks with norms strongly favoring effort and achievement. Networks with norms favoring effort and achievement were more likely to be central to the social system at the end of the school year. Subsequent analyses focused on boys (n = 103) and the effects of affiliation in networks with norms that strongly favored effort and achievement. Twenty‐four percent of boys sustained membership in these networks and experienced greater school valuing and ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jill V. Hamm, Kerrylin Lambert, Charlotte A. Agger, Thomas W. Farmer Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Aggression, Academic Behaviors, and Popularity Perceptions Among Boys of Color During the Transition to Middle School
In this study, peer nominations of aggressive and academic behaviors as well as youths' perceptions of how these behaviors were related to popularity in peer networks were obtained from the spring semester of fifth grade through the spring semester of seventh grade, with the transition occurring as the students entered the sixth grade. The sample included 188 boys (71 Caucasian, 90 African American, and 27 Hispanic) from an urban school district in the northeastern United States. Trajectory analyses showed that African American boys scored lower in studentship and higher in rule‐breaking and aggressive (both physical and...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Hongling Xie, Molly Dawes, Tabitha J. Wurster, Bing Shi Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Gender‐Typed Behaviors, Achievement, and Adjustment Among Racially and Ethnically Diverse Boys During Early Adolescence
This research examined the relations between adherence to gender‐typed behaviors in boys' friendships, achievement, and self‐esteem. Participants were racially and ethnically diverse adolescent boys in grade 8 (Mage = 13.05; range = 12–14). The study was completed at a public junior high school that offered both single‐ and mixed‐gender classes. Data were collected in 2 waves, the first wave in fall of 2010 and the second in spring of 2011. At each wave, participants completed assessments of gender concepts and self‐esteem. Standardized tests scores from the end of the previous academic ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Carlos E. Santos, Kathrine Galligan, Erin Pahlke, Richard A. Fabes Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

School‐ and Community‐Based Associations to Hypermasculine Attitudes in African American Adolescent Males
This study examined the role of hypermasculinity as a form of reactive coping among urban African American adolescent males (ages 12–17) and assessed the extent to which hypermasculinity is influenced by youth appraisals of how adults in their school and community perceive them. Two research questions were addressed: (a) Do adolescent males who report negative community and school experiences use hypermasculine attitudes as a coping response? (b) Do the effects of perceived negative school and community experiences persist, if they are present at all? Participants in the study were 241 African American adolescen...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michael Cunningham, Dena Phillips Swanson, DeMarquis M. Hayes Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Racially Diverse Classrooms: Effects of Classroom Racial Composition on Interracial Peer Relationships
The purpose of this study was to examine the interactive effects that a child's race and the racial composition of a classroom have on a variety of sociometric measures. Sociometric nominations were collected from 872 fifth‐grade students (48% male, 48% Black) who were in classrooms that ranged from nearly all Black to nearly all White students. Hierarchical Linear Modeling analyses indicated that the race of the child, the race of the rater, and the classroom race composition each impacted sociometric nominations. Results suggest that schools that are more balanced in the distribution of Black and White students might p...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Joan M. Barth, Kristina L. McDonald, John E. Lochman, Carolyn Boxmeyer, Nicole Powell, Casey Dillon, Meghann Sallee Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Raising African American Boys: An Exploration of Gender and Racial Socialization Practices
Although parental socialization practices are critical to a child's social development, little is known of the details of how parental practices function to meet the specific challenges of supporting young boys' development as African American and men. Accordingly, this article offers a window onto how 15 parents of African American boys (ages 3–8) conceive and implement strategies for their sons' social and emotional development. Using ethnographic observations and structured interview data, this article explores the ways they promote emerging racial and gender identities and socioemotional well‐being. Findings re...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Lionel C. Howard, Jason C. Rose, Oscar A. Barbarin Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The Relation of Dialogic, Control, and Racial Socialization Practices to Early Academic and Social Competence: Effects of Gender, Ethnicity, and Family Socioeconomic Status
This research tests the relations of parental practices to child competence and assertions that practices differ by gender of the child. Home‐based interviews and structured observations of parent–child interactions were conducted with an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of families (N = 501) whose 4‐year‐old children were served in public prekindergarten. Study data confirmed the importance of parental practices for children's academic and social competence but did not support claims that use of any of the practices was related to the child's gender. Significant differences were found ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Oscar Barbarin, Esther Jean‐Baptiste Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Trajectories of Intrusive Parenting During Infancy and Toddlerhood as Predictors of Rural, Low‐Income African American Boys' School‐Related Outcomes
Stability and change in maternal intrusiveness during early childhood is rarely explored, particularly within African American families. The current study examined the prediction of maternal intrusiveness during the first 3 years of life among mothers of rural, low‐income African American boys and its relation to school‐related outcomes. Observations of mothers (N = 230) interacting with children at 6, 24, and 36 months were coded and analyzed. Predictors of the trajectories and child outcomes were assessed using questionnaires and various tasks. On average, mothers of African American boys increase...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amanda R. Clincy, W. Roger Mills‐Koonce Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

From Higher Order Thinking to Higher Order Behavior: Exploring the Relationship Between Early Cognitive Skills and Social Competence in Black Boys
This study examines the relations of higher order (i.e., abstract) thinking (HOT) skills to specific domains of social competence in Black boys (n = 108) attending publicly sponsored prekindergarten (pre‐K) programs. Data for the study were collected as part of the National Center for Early Development and Learning (NCEDL) Multi‐State Study, a national, longitudinal study examining the quality and outcomes in a representative sample of publicly sponsored pre‐K programs in six states (N = 240). Pre‐K and kindergarten teachers rated randomly selected children on measures of abstract thinking, self...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kristin M. Scott, Oscar A. Barbarin, Jeffrey M. Brown Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Socioemotional Trajectories in Black Boys Between Kindergarten and the Fifth Grade: The Role of Cognitive Skills and Family in Promoting Resiliency
This study tests a multilevel risk model of emotional well‐being assessing the relation of poverty, maternal functioning, and child cognitive competence to changes in Black boys’ internalizing symptoms between kindergarten and the fifth grade. The study utilizes data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study–Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS‐K) to describe development of internalizing problems in a nationally representative sample of Black boys (N = 1603) over the period. Through Latent Growth Curve Analysis, trajectories were identified that showed some boys with stable levels of internalizing symptoms...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jeffrey Brown, Oscar Barbarin, Kristin Scott Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Individual Differences in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms and Associated Executive Dysfunction and Traits: Sex, Ethnicity, and Family Income
The goal of the present investigation was to investigate sex, ethnic, and socioeconomic status (SES) influences on attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and risk markers, including executive dysfunction and temperament traits. Participants were 109 children who were 3 to 6 years old (64% male; 36% ethnic minority) and their primary caregivers and teachers who completed a multistage, multi‐informant screening, and diagnostic procedure. Parents completed a diagnostic interview and diagnostic and temperament questionnaires, teachers completed questionnaires, and children completed cognitive control tasks....
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Michelle M. Martel Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A Longitudinal Examination of Socioemotional Learning in African American and Latino Boys Across the Transition From Pre‐K to Kindergarten
Questions about socioemotional learning in boys of color (BOC) arise in light of the disproportionate rates of school adjustment difficulties BOC experience by adolescence. Socioemotional competence in BOC is assessed in terms of self‐regulation, interpersonal skills, and positive relationships with peers and teachers when they enter pre‐K. Changes in competence are tracked until the end of kindergarten. Teachers from randomly selected early childhood programs in 11 states rated children's socioemotional competence in the fall and spring of pre‐K. Children were followed through the end of kindergarten. Analyses compa...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Oscar Barbarin Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Development of Social‐Emotional Competence in Boys of Color: A Cross‐Sectional Cohort Analysis from Pre‐K to Second Grade
This article explores the development of psychosocial competence in boys of color (BOC; 226 African Americans and 109 Latinos). Changes in competence were assessed over 2 years in cohorts of low‐income BOC beginning in pre‐K, kindergarten, or first grade. Psycho‐social competence was assessed in terms of self‐regulation, interpersonal skills, and positive relationships with peers and teachers. Psycho‐social and academic competence in literacy and math were assessed in prekindergarten through second grade using teacher reports, child reports, and normed measures. One‐year follow‐up data were available on ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - July 29, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Oscar Barbarin, Iheoma U. Iruka, Chistine Harradine, Donna‐Marie C. Winn, Marvin K. McKinney, Lorraine C. Taylor Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Development of Boys of Color: An Introduction
(Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry)
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - April 1, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Oscar A. Barbarin Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Adult Attachment, Emotion Dysregulation, and Symptoms of Depression and Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Differences in attachment style have been linked to both emotion regulation and psychological functioning, but the emotion regulatory mechanism through which attachment style might impact symptoms of depression and anxiety is unclear. The present study examined the explanatory role of emotion dysregulation in the relation between adult attachment style and symptoms of depression and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) in a sample of 284 adults. Secure attachment was associated with lower depression and GAD symptoms and lower emotion dysregulation, whereas insecure attachment styles were generally associated with higher depr...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Anna Marganska, Michelle Gallagher, Regina Miranda Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Psychometric Properties of a New Measure to Assess Autism Spectrum Disorder in DSM‐5
This article presents preliminary psychometric properties of a new 45‐item scale, the Coolidge Autistic Symptoms Survey (CASS), designed to differentiate between children within the autism spectrum (including Asperger's Disorder) and purportedly normal children, in anticipation of DSM‐5 changes, in which a single diagnostic category is proposed: autism spectrum disorder. The final sample (N = 72) consisted of 19 children diagnosed with Asperger's Disorder, 19 children who were considered loners by their parents (without an autism diagnosis), and 34 purportedly normal children. The CASS and the 200‐item, DSM‐IV‐TR...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Frederick L. Coolidge, Peter D. Marle, Camille S. Rhoades, Patricia Monaghan, Daniel L. Segal Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

It's Not You, It's Me: An Examination of Clinician‐ and Client‐Level Influences on Countertransference Toward Borderline Personality Disorder
Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) appear more likely than individuals with other mental disorders to evoke negative countertransference reactions. The current study examined countertransference toward BPD across client‐ (e.g., client age and gender) and clinician‐level (e.g., age, discipline, clinical experience, training) factors. Participants (N = 560) completed an anonymous online survey in which they read case information describing a client with BPD and answered questions to assess their reactions toward the client. The study used a 2 × 2 between‐subjects design in ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rachel E. Liebman, Mandi Burnette Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A Prospective Study of Differential Sources of School‐Related Social Support and Adolescent Global Life Satisfaction
This study examined the cross‐sectional and prospective relationships between three sources of school‐related social support (parent involvement, peer support for learning, and teacher‐student relationships) and early adolescents’ global life satisfaction. The participants were 597 middle school students from 1 large school in the southeastern United States who completed measures of school social climate and life satisfaction on 2 occasions, 5 months apart. The results revealed that school‐related experiences in terms of social support for learning contributed substantial amounts of variance to individua...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: James Siddall, E. Scott Huebner, Xu Jiang Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

An Ecological Approach to Children's Rights and Participation: Interrelationships and Correlates of Rights in Different Ecological Systems
This study, carried out among 1,753 Israeli adolescents (ages 15–17), uses a socioecological perspective instead to understand children's rights and participation. It examines adolescents' approaches to their rights and participation at 4 ecological levels—family, school, community, and the larger sociopolitical system—as well as a number of possible child, family, and societal correlates. It also looks at the interactions between some of these correlates. The findings show that different correlates have different links with various ecological circles. For example, girls reported higher levels of particip...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Asher Ben‐Arieh, Shalhevet Attar‐Schwartz Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

The Added Value of the School of the 21st Century When Combined With a Statewide Preschool Program
Although schools have begun to employ multiple programs to reach educational goals, little attention has been paid to the efficacy of combining separate programs. The present study investigates the combination of a school reform model, the School of the 21st Century (21C), and the Arkansas Better Chance (ABC) program, where preschools apply for state funds to provide high quality services to children at risk. To determine if 21C adds anything to the ABC program, the present study compared results from a developmental assessment. The authors compared school‐based preschools that had both ABC and 21C services to those prog...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Misty Ginicola, Matia Finn‐Stevenson, Edward Zigler Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Identifying and Addressing Mental Health Risks and Problems in Primary Care Pediatric Settings: A Model to Promote Developmental and Cultural Competence
Young children, particularly uninsured children of color, suffer from mental health disturbances at rates similar to older children and adults, yet they have higher rates of unmet needs. To address unmet needs, efforts to identify mental health problems in primary care pediatric settings have grown in recent years, thanks in large part to expanded screening efforts. Yet, health disparities in early detection remain. Enhancing understanding of how early childhood mental health problems can be identified and addressed within pediatric settings is an important and growing area of research. The authors draw on theoretical mode...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Leandra Godoy, Alice S. Carter Tags: Orignal Article Source Type: research

Prenatal Methamphetamine Exposure, Home Environment, and Primary Caregiver Risk Factors Predict Child Behavioral Problems at 5 Years
This study investigated the prospective association between prenatal methamphetamine (MA) exposure and child behavioral problems at 5 years while also examining the home environment at 30 months and several primary caregiver (PC) risk factors. Participants were 97 MA‐exposed and 117 comparison children and their PCs enrolled in the Infant Development, Environment and Lifestyle Study. Hypotheses were that child behaviors would be adversely impacted by (a) prenatal MA exposure, (b) home environments that provided less developmental stimulation and emotional responsiveness to the child, and (c) the presence of PC ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Jean Twomey, Linda LaGasse, Chris Derauf, Elana Newman, Rizwan Shah, Lynne Smith, Amelia Arria, Marilyn Huestis, Sheri DellaGrotta, Mary Roberts, Lynne Dansereau, Charles Neal, Barry Lester Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Self‐Reported Methods of Cessation of Adult Male Child Abusers: A Pilot Study
This pilot study explored the pre‐arrest self‐selected cessation attempts of sexual offenders (N = 109) who abused children and often others. Four participants were dropped because of invalid responding (N = 104). While 74.3% of sample participants reported attempts to decrease or stop their sexual offending prior to arrest, 56% out of 100 who responded to the cessation question reported that they were able to do so. Self‐efficacy was examined as a potential predictive variable of cessation attempts and success of attempts; however, no relationship was found between self‐efficacy and attempts. P...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amy Booxbaum, David L. Burton Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Testing a Multiple Mediator Model of the Effect of Childhood Sexual Abuse on Adolescent Sexual Victimization
The present study modeled the direct relationship between child sexual abuse (CSA) and adolescent peer‐to‐peer sexual victimization (APSV) and the mediated effect via variables representing the number of sexual partners, sexual risk behavior, and signaling sexual boundaries. A cross‐sectional study on the effect of CSA on APSV was conducted, utilizing a multiple mediator model. Mediated and direct effects in the model were estimated employing Mplus using bootstrapped percentile based confidence intervals to test for significance of mediated effects. The study employed 327 Danish female adolescents with a mean age of ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Rikke H. Bramsen, Mathias Lasgaard, Mary P. Koss, Mark Shevlin, Ask Elklit, Jytte Banner Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Parent–Youth Discrepancies in Ratings of Youth Victimization: Associations With Psychological Adjustment
This study extends research examining the implications of parent–youth informant discrepancies on youth victimization. Latent class analysis (LCA) identified dyads distinguished by patterns of parent and youth report of victimization. Analyses examined how latent classes were related to adjustment (i.e., anxiety/depression, aggression, and delinquency) concurrently and at follow‐up assessment (~2.5 years) in a socioeconomically and ethnically diverse sample. Participants were 485 youths (58.1% male; M age = 12.83 years, SD = 1.60) and their primary caregivers from the Project on Human ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Kimberly Goodman Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Child Maltreatment Reports in Israel: The Intersection Between Community Socioeconomic Characteristics and Ethnicity
The authors examined the relationship between community characteristics and child maltreatment reports in Israel, comparing Jewish and Arab localities both in terms of maltreatment reports and the responses of the social services to these reports. Administrative data were obtained from the protective services and the Central Bureau of Statistics for 231 local authorities in Israel (covering 98% of children in Israel). Jewish communities showed significantly more reports of sexual abuse and physical abuse than Arab communities. Reporting rates also showed different associations with socioeconomic and demographic variables. ...
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Yafit Sulimani‐Aidan, Rami Benbenishty Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

Holding Accountability Accountable: A Cost–Benefit Analysis of Achievement Test Scores
(Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry)
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Murray Levine, Adeline Levine Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

So Close and Yet So Far Away: Social Class, Social Exclusion, and Mental Health Practice
(Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry)
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 18, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Laura Smith Tags: Original Article Source Type: research

A Swan Song (or a Fanfare): Some Thoughts of an Institute Director After 30 Years of Service
(Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry)
Source: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry - January 1, 2013 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Gary B. Melton Tags: Original Article Source Type: research