Bringing Emergency Medicine to Eswatini
​BY ADERONKE SUSAN AKAPO, DO; KATHLEEN ANNE ROCCO, MD; EDWARD KAKISH, DO; & KRIS BRICKMAN, MDEswatini, known as Swaziland until April 2018, is a small South African country approximately the size of New Jersey. It has 1.3 million people, and is bordered by South Africa and Mozambique.The country primarily comprises rural tribal areas with two major cities, Manzini and Mbabane, in the central portion of the country. Eswatini holds the unfortunate distinction of having the highest HIV rate in the world—approximately 26 percent of its population. Emergency medicine within this small country is clearly in its devel...
Source: Going Global - December 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Providing Care at 10,000 Feet
Going on a medical mission with the Himalayan Health Exchange to the Himachal Pradesh region of India allowed me to see a part of the world that I had never experienced before. The patient population that we were seeing had very little access, if any, to medical care throughout the year. We had to travel on foot to their villages to provide care because of their remote location. But the trip was quite unforgettable—we spent all our off days hiking through the Himalayas, had night-time views of the Milky Way, and ate more Indian food than we could have ever imagined.The flight from Delhi to Leh was incredible. We coul...
Source: Going Global - February 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

The Joy and Challenge of Simple Medicine in India
​BY KATE BANKS, MDThe Himalayan Health Exchange (HHE) is an organization that assembles volunteers and health care providers from all over the world to deliver care in underserved areas in northern India. I had the amazing opportunity in my second year of residency to spend a month delivering medical care with HHE in the beautiful inner Himalayan mountains. The month was full of exploring, trekking, camping, learning, doctoring, and personal and professional growth.The clinics were scattered throughout different areas in the state of Himachal Pradesh. Our convoy of interpreters, cooks, volunteers, and health care profess...
Source: Going Global - December 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

EDs in Different Parts of the World but the Same Stories
​BY TIM DEPP, MD​I spent two weeks in India and another two weeks at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Minnesota during my global health elective month. It was a great time to reflect on sustainability in developing world medicine and on my medical education and career goals.​Emergency medicine in India is still in its infancy. Some might say it's only just been conceived, still waiting to be born. India is growing incredibly in numerous sectors, and several universities, including George Washington University (GWU), have partnered with established hospitals there to grow the specialty. After completi...
Source: Going Global - December 1, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Building Self-Sustainable Health Care in Uganda
​BY JK FALLIN, MD​I had the opportunity to travel an extraordinarily long distance to Uganda last year on a mission with One World Heath, a nonprofit that aims to provide affordable health care to communities in need. The trip had a rather disjointed start because Delta forgot that they needed a computer to fly their airplane. After this minor hiccup, we embarked on our journey across the Atlantic, then Europe and Africa before landing in Entebbe, Uganda.Entebbe is about 20 miles southwest of Kampala, the capital city of Uganda, but there is in reality little demarcation between the two towns. It's located along beauti...
Source: Going Global - August 9, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Expanding Access to Ultrasound in Tanzania
​BY CHLOE MCCOY, MDI knew I wanted a global health experience that offered the opportunity to have an impact on patients but also on the health care infrastructure and local physicians. This led me to research trips that involved teaching opportunities, specifically ones involving ultrasound.As a resident at Palmetto Health Richland, we learn how to use ultrasound in our daily practice to make quick and accurate decisions about clinical care. Our program's emphasis on its use made ultrasound a standard-of-care component of emergency medicine for me over the past several years. Teaching ultrasound seemed like a great oppo...
Source: Going Global - May 5, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

How the Other Half Lives in Haiti
​BY TIM DEPP, MD​Arriving in Port-au-Prince was like walking into another world. It was hot. The roads were dusty. In spite of reports of aid money being siphoned off and how little progress was being made in rebuilding, the parts of the city we drove through appeared improved since the earthquake. My first impressions of the city were positive, especially considering what I was expecting.Despite Haiti's long and difficult history of slavery, revolution, poverty, violent dictators, overwhelming debt, failed development projects, deforestation, and natural disasters, including the earthquake of 2010 and the cholera epid...
Source: Going Global - March 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Volunteering with a Little Fun and Holiday Mixed In
​BY LUKE HUSBY, DOOn a cool Monday afternoon, the plane to Dulles, then Frankfurt, and ultimately Bangalore took off. I landed two calendar days later in a place about 40°F warmer, with a weather forecast of "smoke."I was greeted by a driver who only spoke Tamil. He took me to my hotel room less than a mile from the hospital where I was volunteering through congested traffic that held no regard for traffic lines or signs. The ED in Bangalore is essentially a 10-bed department, divided into a high-acuity and low-acuity sections.The high-acuity section of the ED.An entire herd of students flocked to see one p...
Source: Going Global - February 3, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Can You Help?
BY KEITH DOUGLASS WARNER, OFM, PHDAbout 21 percent of Mexico's population lives in rural areas, according to the World Bank, yet only 2.3 percent of the country's 259,000 practicing physicians work there. That may seem like an insurmountable problem to some, but to Haywood Hall, MD, a high-school-dropout-turned-emergency-physician, it was a perfect opportunity to found PACE MD, a program that aims to enhance health care delivery in Mexico.Mexico's fragmented health system with substantial but often poorly coordinated resources was crying out for someone to teach rural Mexican physicians, all of whom were fully qualified by...
Source: Going Global - January 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Connection to Samoa
​BY TIM DEPP, MD​No one knows when the first Samoans landed on what is now the Samoan Islands, the destination of our journey. The Samoans have most likely been there for several thousand years, since the Lapita people (ancestors of the Polynesians) migrated there between 1200 and 1000 BC, making Samoan culture, in a word, ancient. Spaniards, pirates, and missionaries came and went. And "fa'asamoa," the Samoan way, has continued, albeit somewhat changed. Important distinctions are maintained, including the divide between the sovereign nation of Samoa (formerly Western Samoa) and American Samoa (a U.S. protect...
Source: Going Global - January 6, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Making a Lasting Impact in Nicaragua
​By CASEY GRAVES​, MD​The Northeast Presbyterian Church (NEPC) has been organizing mission trips to Nicaragua for many years. These trips generally comprise operating roving clinics and performing ministry work in different parts of the country each year. Recently, they added a new option: The church began sending volunteers to a newly established clinic in an extremely poor community to provide affordable care, and I was one of them.   Cristo Rey was a community formed from the good intentions of the Spanish government, which carries out a significant amount of humanitarian work in Nicaragua. Many peo...
Source: Going Global - December 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Making a Lasting Impact in Nicaragua
​By CASEY GRAVES​, MD​The Northeast Presbyterian Church (NEPC) has been organizing mission trips to Nicaragua for many years. These trips generally comprise operating roving clinics and performing ministry work in different parts of the country each year. Recently, they added a new option: The church began sending volunteers to a newly established clinic in an extremely poor community to provide affordable care, and I was one of them.   Cristo Rey was a community formed from the good intentions of the Spanish government, which carries out a significant amount of humanitarian work in Nicaragua. Many peo...
Source: Going Global - December 5, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Elephants and Mobile Clinics in Uganda
​By Luke Husby, DO, and Heather Brown, MDWe arrived in rural Masindi, Uganda, after more than 24 hours of air travel and a five-hour van ride over the only two paved roads in the country. The travel was fairly exhausting.The Masindi-Kitara Medical Centre (MKMC) is a fully functional hospital in Masindi, Uganda, run by Palmetto Medical Initiative (PMI), a nonprofit organization based in Charleston, SC. MKMC has multiple nurses, an inpatient ward, and obstetrics, gynecologic, surgical, and outpatient wards. It recently established itself as a low-cost, self-sustainable, private clinic to offset the two opposing ends of the...
Source: Going Global - March 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Trip to India
BY MICHAEL DAUM, MDI had the wonderful privilege of visiting three different cities in India for 16 days during my third year of residency. My original impression of India was, "Wow." This country could not be any more different from what I am used to.I am just a small-town boy from southern Indiana, but my medical training has given me the opportunity to visit poverty-stricken areas and witness different medical practices in Honduras, Guatemala, and Haiti. But India was just different. Name anything. From the obvious — language, food, population density, climate, dress, and religion — to the not-so o...
Source: Going Global - February 1, 2016 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Patients in the Himalayas Grateful for Care
BY RACHEL EDWARDS, MD   I traveled to India in August 2014 with Himalayan Health Exchange (HHE), which organizes groups of attending physicians, residents, medical students, and nurses from around the world to travel to one of the most remote parts of the world, deep in the Himalayan Mountains. Our route took us to the Pangi Valley of Northern India, where the road we traveled has only existed for a decade and is impassable during the winter months when the road is covered in snow. The people who live there are resilient and hardened by their environment of mountainous terrain and harsh climate.     O...
Source: Going Global - November 18, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Patients in the Himalayas Grateful for Care
BY RACHEL EDWARDS, MD   I traveled to India in August 2014 with Himalayan Health Exchange (HHE), which organizes groups of attending physicians, residents, medical students, and nurses from around the world to travel to one of the most remote parts of the world, deep in the Himalayan Mountains. Our route took us to the Pangi Valley of Northern India, where the road we traveled has only existed for a decade and is impassable during the winter months when the road is covered in snow. The people who live there are resilient and hardened by their environment of mountainous terrain and harsh climate.     Our gro...
Source: Going Global - November 18, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Luke and Lesley’s Excellent Samoan Adventure
BY LUKE HUSBY, MD, & AND LESLEY OSBORN, MD   Ten hours of air time and three cities later, we arrived in the Honolulu airport to be greeted by the Samoan travelers who would be guiding us around Samoa.        Once we arrived in Pago Pago in American Samoa, we hit the ground running with a quick trip to the supply cache at a nearby pastor’s house. After a few hours of sorting, we were ready for the week with the pharmaceuticals, bandages, durable medical equipment, and other supplies that we’d need.   Each plane had a weight limit, and there was only one plane with 31 vo...
Source: Going Global - February 2, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Luke and Lesley’s Excellent Samoan Adventure
BY LUKE HUSBY, MD, & AND LESLEY OSBORN, MD   Ten hours of air time and three cities later, we arrived in the Honolulu airport to be greeted by the Samoan travelers who would be guiding us around Samoa.        Once we arrived in Pago Pago in American Samoa, we hit the ground running with a quick trip to the supply cache at a nearby pastor’s house. After a few hours of sorting, we were ready for the week with the pharmaceuticals, bandages, durable medical equipment, and other supplies that we’d need.   Each plane had a weight limit, and there was only one plane with 31 volunteers...
Source: Going Global - January 30, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Special to Going Global Blog: The 'Why' of Ultrasound
By Christine Butts, MD   I typically write my columns about the “how” of ultrasound, but it's also important to think about the “why.” Ultrasound to me is a tool that can be shared across cultures and barriers to broaden education and to improve patient care.   So when a colleague approached me about teaching ultrasound in Kurdistan, Iraq, I was intrigued. Nervous but intrigued. I have been teaching ultrasound to residents, students, and other faculty here in the States for almost seven years, but have always harbored a desire to teach internationally.   I spent two months as a ...
Source: Going Global - January 9, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Special to Going Global Blog: The 'Why' of Ultrasound
By Christine Butts, MD   I typically write my columns about the “how” of ultrasound, but it's also important to think about the “why.” Ultrasound to me is a tool that can be shared across cultures and barriers to broaden education and to improve patient care.   So when a colleague approached me about teaching ultrasound in Kurdistan, Iraq, I was intrigued. Nervous but intrigued. I have been teaching ultrasound to residents, students, and other faculty here in the States for almost seven years, but have always harbored a desire to teach internationally.   I spent two months as a medica...
Source: Going Global - January 9, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Chaos and Tragedy in a Cambodian ED
By Remi Kessler & Natalie Catherwood   Ms. B was middle-aged and lying on a gurney without a sheet in the grossly under-resourced ED of the largest public hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. She clearly had an altered level of consciousness, and she was not attached to the monitor that was behind the bed. Her open shirt exposed her to the entire ED, but her family had other concerns.   They were quick to leave as we made our way toward the bed. It became evident that she had not been seen by a doctor, despite her deteriorating condition and her family's persistent anxiety. We saw her chest rise and fall irr...
Source: Going Global - November 3, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Chaos and Tragedy in a Cambodian ED
By Remi Kessler & Natalie Catherwood   Ms. B was middle-aged and lying on a gurney without a sheet in the grossly under-resourced ED of the largest public hospital in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. She clearly had an altered level of consciousness, and she was not attached to the monitor that was behind the bed. Her open shirt exposed her to the entire ED, but her family had other concerns.   They were quick to leave as we made our way toward the bed. It became evident that she had not been seen by a doctor, despite her deteriorating condition and her family's persistent anxiety. We saw her chest rise and fall irregul...
Source: Going Global - November 3, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Trek through Nepal
By Chris Stodard, MD, and Steve Tanner, MD   April 5: Today is the first day of camp and clinic. We started the day off with a lecture for the local health care workers, and then set our sights on taking care of patients. They were already lining up two hours before we opened our doors. The villagers have not had access to this type of health care for more than a year. The most rewarding experience we had today was with a patient who had a febrile seizure. The patient’s mother was panicking but felt much better and thanked us after we were done. Multiple patients had musculoskeletal complaints and upper respir...
Source: Going Global - October 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Trek through Nepal
By Chris Stodard, MD, and Steve Tanner, MD   April 5: Today is the first day of camp and clinic. We started the day off with a lecture for the local health care workers, and then set our sights on taking care of patients. They were already lining up two hours before we opened our doors. The villagers have not had access to this type of health care for more than a year. The most rewarding experience we had today was with a patient who had a febrile seizure. The patient’s mother was panicking but felt much better and thanked us after we were done. Multiple patients had musculoskeletal complaints and upper respirat...
Source: Going Global - October 2, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Contrasting American EDs with the World’s Largest Hospital
By Zubair Chao, MD   Dr. Thomas Cook and I escaped the dry heat of South Carolina to land in Chengdu, China, home of West China Hospital, in July 2012. He was set to teach an emergency ultrasound class, and I was on a global mission as part of my emergency medicine residency.   Some say it is the largest hospital in the world, boasting 5,000 beds, nearly 100 operating suites, and a large outpatient center, which, on any given day, has about 10,000 patients.     West China Hospital   The ED at West China Hospital recently moved to its new home in a larger, more modern facility. It sees abou...
Source: Going Global - September 3, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Contrasting American EDs with the World’s Largest Hospital
By Zubair Chao, MD   Dr. Thomas Cook and I escaped the dry heat of South Carolina to land in Chengdu, China, home of West China Hospital, in July 2012. He was set to teach an emergency ultrasound class, and I was on a global mission as part of my emergency medicine residency.   Some say it is the largest hospital in the world, boasting 5,000 beds, nearly 100 operating suites, and a large outpatient center, which, on any given day, has about 10,000 patients.     West China Hospital   The ED at West China Hospital recently moved to its new home in a larger, more modern facility. It sees about 160,000...
Source: Going Global - September 3, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Intense Heat, Mosquitos, and Unsafe Drinking Water Test EP in Haiti
By Jon Virkler, MD   Arrival in Haiti was a stark contrast from departure in Miami.   I had my passport scanned by an electronic sensor and rode two moving sidewalks and a train to gate D55 in Miami. I deplaned in Haiti at one of the two gates at the only international airport in the country, walked down the steps from the airplane onto the tarmac, and got onto a standing-room-only bus that took us to customs. Our bags arrived on the only baggage carousel in the airport.   The airport in Haiti.   We left the airport as a group, and fought through the throng of porters hoping for a tip of one o...
Source: Going Global - August 5, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Intense Heat, Mosquitos, and Unsafe Drinking Water Test EP in Haiti
By Jon Virkler, MD   Arrival in Haiti was a stark contrast from departure in Miami.   I had my passport scanned by an electronic sensor and rode two moving sidewalks and a train to gate D55 in Miami. I deplaned in Haiti at one of the two gates at the only international airport in the country, walked down the steps from the airplane onto the tarmac, and got onto a standing-room-only bus that took us to customs. Our bags arrived on the only baggage carousel in the airport.   The airport in Haiti.   We left the airport as a group, and fought through the throng of porters hoping for a tip of one or two Ame...
Source: Going Global - August 5, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Making a Difference in Samoa
By Peyton Hassinger, MD Josh Skaggs, Nathan Ramsey, and I traveled to Samoa with Mission of Hope Ministries for two weeks in July 2012. We were part of a team of about 35 people consisting of four doctors (one other pediatrician from Hawaii), four nurses, medical students, and many other support staff. Mission of Hope is a South Carolina organization that has been taking groups to Samoa every year for the past 15 years to do medical work. (http://missionofhope-us.org.) The leader is a pastor originally from American Samoa who now lives in Columbia, SC. He recently became the chief of his village in American Samoa, and is...
Source: Going Global - May 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Making a Difference in Samoa
By Peyton Hassinger, MD Josh Skaggs, Nathan Ramsey, and I traveled to Samoa with Mission of Hope Ministries for two weeks in July 2012. We were part of a team of about 35 people consisting of four doctors (one other pediatrician from Hawaii), four nurses, medical students, and many other support staff. Mission of Hope is a South Carolina organization that has been taking groups to Samoa every year for the past 15 years to do medical work. (http://missionofhope-us.org.) The leader is a pastor originally from American Samoa who now lives in Columbia, SC. He recently became the chief of his village in American Samoa, and is n...
Source: Going Global - May 12, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Eye-Opening Medical Missions in India and China
By Zubair Chao, MD   I had an opportunity to visit India as part of George Washington University’s International Emergency Medicine & Global Public Health Fellowship Program in April 2013. I gave lectures on endocrinology and HEENT as teaching faculty. I had already planned to go to China with my residency program and ultrasound fellowship directors, Drs. Cook and Hunt, respectively, and it was an easy decision for me to combine the trips for a firsthand view of emergency medical services in the world’s two most populated countries.   Emergency medicine is new in India, and it is not widely ac...
Source: Going Global - March 5, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Eye-Opening Medical Missions in India and China
By Zubair Chao, MD   I had an opportunity to visit India as part of George Washington University’s International Emergency Medicine & Global Public Health Fellowship Program in April 2013. I gave lectures on endocrinology and HEENT as teaching faculty. I had already planned to go to China with my residency program and ultrasound fellowship directors, Drs. Cook and Hunt, respectively, and it was an easy decision for me to combine the trips for a firsthand view of emergency medical services in the world’s two most populated countries.   Emergency medicine is new in India, and it is not widely accept...
Source: Going Global - March 5, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Solidifying my Career Path in Samoa
By Nathan Ramsey, MD   I’ve had the privilege of going on two medical missions to Samoa during my residency at Palmetto Health Richland. The first was after my intern year in July 2009; it changed my life and helped to solidify my chosen career path.       I fell in love with the Samoan people during my first trip, and returned the following year with several people from Palmetto, including emergency nurses and fellow residents.     The trip was made possible by a nondenominational Christian organization in Columbia, SC, called Mission of Hope. The director is a local past...
Source: Going Global - December 2, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Solidifying my Career Path in Samoa
By Nathan Ramsey, MD   I’ve had the privilege of going on two medical missions to Samoa during my residency at Palmetto Health Richland. The first was after my intern year in July 2009; it changed my life and helped to solidify my chosen career path.       I fell in love with the Samoan people during my first trip, and returned the following year with several people from Palmetto, including emergency nurses and fellow residents.     The trip was made possible by a nondenominational Christian organization in Columbia, SC, called Mission of Hope. The director is a local pastor who grew ...
Source: Going Global - December 2, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Week of Hard but Rewarding Work in Honduras
By Mara Levitt, MD, & Ashley Davis, MD   Honduras, a Central American country bordered by Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua, is home to more than eight million people, and produces minerals, coffee, tropical fruit and sugar cane. The capital, Tegucigalpa, is divided into 18 departments; we traveled to Intibuca.   Honduras has the highest rate of homicide in the world. The water supply and sanitation varies from modernized water treatment systems to basic systems, from sewer systems to latrines and basic septic pits. A lack of maintenance leads to poor water quality, and residents’ health varies ...
Source: Going Global - November 11, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

A Week of Hard but Rewarding Work in Honduras
By Mara Levitt, MD, & Ashley Davis, MD   Honduras, a Central American country bordered by Guatemala, El Salvador, and Nicaragua, is home to more than eight million people, and produces minerals, coffee, tropical fruit and sugar cane. The capital, Tegucigalpa, is divided into 18 departments; we traveled to Intibuca.   Honduras has the highest rate of homicide in the world. The water supply and sanitation varies from modernized water treatment systems to basic systems, from sewer systems to latrines and basic septic pits. A lack of maintenance leads to poor water quality, and residents’ health varies depe...
Source: Going Global - November 11, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Teaching Ultrasound in Guatemala
By Peyton Hassinger, MD   I spent a week working with Mayan Medical Aid in a small Guatemalan village called Santa Cruz this past March. I traveled to the clinic, which was located on Lake Atitlan in the country’s volcanic highlands, with my fiancé who is an emergency medicine nurse at Palmetto Health. We treated patients with a variety of acute and chronic complaints, including prenatal care, and referred patients back to the primary clinic in Santa Cruz when necessary. We also ran outreach clinics to small and remote villages that could be reached only by foot and boat.       On...
Source: Going Global - October 11, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Teaching Ultrasound in Guatemala
By Peyton Hassinger, MD   I spent a week working with Mayan Medical Aid in a small Guatemalan village called Santa Cruz this past March. I traveled to the clinic, which was located on Lake Atitlan in the country’s volcanic highlands, with my fiancé who is an emergency medicine nurse at Palmetto Health. We treated patients with a variety of acute and chronic complaints, including prenatal care, and referred patients back to the primary clinic in Santa Cruz when necessary. We also ran outreach clinics to small and remote villages that could be reached only by foot and boat.       One of the...
Source: Going Global - October 11, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

An Amazing Experience in Nepal
By Heather Brown, MD     I had an amazing opportunity to spend a month working in the ED at Scheer Memorial Hospital in Banepa, Nepal, during my second year of residency. Scheer is a missionary hospital 30 kilometers outside Kathmandu with a six-bed emergency room open 24 hours a day. The ED was staffed with a mix of seasoned western physicians and young Nepali house staff who were mostly recent medical school graduates. There were plenty of chances to make a serious impact, and I was ready to do just that!   Arriving in Nepal I’ve been passionate about international medicine since I was in co...
Source: Going Global - September 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

An Amazing Experience in Nepal
By Heather Brown, MD     I had an amazing opportunity to spend a month working in the ED at Scheer Memorial Hospital in Banepa, Nepal, during my second year of residency. Scheer is a missionary hospital 30 kilometers outside Kathmandu with a six-bed emergency room open 24 hours a day. The ED was staffed with a mix of seasoned western physicians and young Nepali house staff who were mostly recent medical school graduates. There were plenty of chances to make a serious impact, and I was ready to do just that!   Arriving in Nepal I’ve been passionate about international medicine since I was in college, ...
Source: Going Global - September 12, 2013 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs