Calf Cramp Cure From a Certified Diabetes Educator
By Web Team If you have diabetes, you may be all too familiar with the annoying phenomenon of waking from a sound sleep with a cramp in your calf. According to Karen Kemmis, PT, DPT, MS, CDE, writing on the American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) Blog, these cramps can arise for a variety of reasons, including dehydration, potassium deficiency, neuropathy (nerve damage), or muscle overuse. Although it is best if the cause of a person's nighttime calf cramps can be determined and addressed, Kemmis notes that this is not always possible. In these cases, she has found that routinely stretching the calf muscles be...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 30, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

Pistachios Offer Protection for People With Diabetes
By Diane Fennell Research has indicated that eating pistachios along with a high-glycemic meal may help lower after-meal blood sugar response, particularly in people with metabolic syndrome (a cluster of factors that raises the risk of heart disease, stroke, and Type 2 diabetes). Now, a small new study from Penn State University suggests that these nuts may also improve heart health in people who have Type 2 by reducing the body's cardiovascular responses to everyday stress. Heart attack and stroke are the leading causes of death in people who have diabetes. To evaluate the effects of pistachios on various aspects of car...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 29, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

The Outside Like the Inside
By Scott Coulter My wife and I have been updating our house this summer. We repainted about half our rooms with a new color, tore up some carpeting along our stairs to reveal the hardwood underneath (which, perhaps next summer, we might sand, restain, and get in better shape), put in new curtains, updated the window blinds to something more substantial and modern, put in some new furniture, and put in a new bookshelf that I built and stained myself (I'm somewhat proud of that one…). What started as just an idea to update the color of one room has turned into a pretty hefty makeover. Our house is currently looking be...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 28, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

Control Solution = Better Control?
By Quinn Phillips Monitoring blood glucose at home is second nature to many people with diabetes. In fact, it's often so automatic that you may not stop to think about all the steps in the process that may interfere with achieving an accurate blood glucose reading. First, there's the near-automatic loss of accuracy that comes from taking a blood sample from capillaries, which is what happens with both fingertip and alternate-site testing. The blood glucose level in your capillaries is delayed compared to the blood glucose level in your veins, which is considered your "true" blood glucose level and is what lab tests measure...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 27, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Quinn Phillips Source Type: blogs

Anxiety and Grief
By David Spero My phone client Roscoe was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes three years ago. He's doing well, with an A1C of 5.9. "But I'm still scared," he told me. "And I'm still sad. Do these feelings ever go away?" I don't get that question very often. Not because people don't have those feelings, but because they're afraid to bring them up. I give Roscoe credit for being brave enough to ask, but what should I tell him? Let's face it: Even well-controlled diabetes brings loss (grief) and fear of loss (anxiety). We may lose our sense of ourselves as being healthy; as being people who never have to check blood sugar levels ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 27, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Time for Your Annual Flu Shot
By Web Team Fall is right around the corner, which means that flu season will soon be in full swing. For people with diabetes, getting this virus can lead to serious complications (such as pneumonia), so it is generally recommended that they receive a flu shot every year. And because it takes roughly two weeks for the vaccine to become effective, the ideal time to receive it is early September. To find out what locations near you are offering the flu vaccine, type your zip code into the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services flu vaccine finder. And to learn more about flu prevention and treatment, read the piece...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 26, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

FDA Approves New Oral Drug for Type 2 Diabetes
By Diane Fennell On August 1, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the oral diabetes drug Jardiance (generic name empagliflozin) for use, along with a healthful diet and exercise, in adults with Type 2 diabetes. The medicine, a joint development of Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals and Eli Lilly and Company, joins Invokana (canagliflozin) and Farxiga (dapagliflozin) as a member of the class of drugs known as sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. In the process of filtering the blood, the kidneys typically reabsorb all the filtered glucose and return it to the bloodstream. One of the main pr...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 8, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

Toughen Up, Kids
By Scott Coulter So I've been codirecting a jazz camp this week for the school where I teach piano. It's a weeklong camp, with about 15 students. Most of them are beginners, while a few are on the cusp of being in the intermediate stage in their musical development. Already, we've had a few quit because they felt they weren't up to the challenge. And this has got me to thinking about the idea of facing challenges in a broader context. I see a lot of parallels, actually, between the process of learning how to play jazz and living with diabetes. Both involve great patience, both involve high tolerance for "not knowing," and...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 7, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

Doing Your Own Research
By David Spero Doctors used to be the only source of medical information. Not anymore. You can get much of the same information on the Internet. Problem is, not all of the information you'll come across online is good. Here are some ways to empower yourself with good Internet research: • It's good to have some general "search engine" sites as a starting point on your quest for information. I usually start with Google. Yahoo and Bing are also good. Search engine sites will give you a list of more specific sites where you can get the information you seek. For example, a Google search for "diabetes" gives over 70 milli...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 6, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Pills vs. Programs
By Quinn Phillips It has often been observed that our health-care system is designed, first and foremost, to provide treatment for acute conditions — that is, conditions that can be treated and cured, leaving the patient healthy until the next illness or malady comes along. Chronic conditions such as Type 2 diabetes and obesity often receive less attention than they deserve, given that they account for a large share of health-care costs in the United States and many other industrialized countries. For example, many insurance plans will cover only a few hours of diabetes education, while fully covering amputations due...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 6, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Quinn Phillips Source Type: blogs

Dispelling the Myths of Insulin Therapy
By Betsy Carlisle In my position as a pharmacist and certified diabetes educator, physicians often assign me the task of starting their patients with Type 2 diabetes on insulin therapy. Unfortunately, in most situations, insulin has been presented to these patients as a last-ditch treatment option, after target glucose goals have not been achieved or maintained with lifestyle modifications and other therapies. Not surprisingly, I encounter people who are upset at the news that insulin is now necessary. Others feel anxious or overwhelmed by the prospect of fitting insulin into their lifestyles. Many people believe that ins...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 5, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Betsy Carlisle Source Type: blogs

Beer and Health: Nine Questions Answered
By Amy Campbell In honor of International Beer Day, an unofficial holiday that was observed on August 1, I thought I'd take the opportunity this week to focus on this well-loved beverage. Beer has been around for a long time. Evidence of beer dates back about 5,000 years (those ancient Sumerians surely knew how to have a good time). Archeologists have unearthed vessels from about 3,400 BC lined with beer residue. And the ancient Egyptians enjoyed beer as part of their daily lives — even children drank this bubbly brew. What is beer? According to the website A Perfect Pint, beer is an alcoholic beverage usually made f...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 4, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

Children With Diabetes "Focus on Technology" Conference
By Web Team If you have a child with Type 1 diabetes and are feeling overwhelmed by all the technology that's available to help him manage his condition, then you may be interested in the Children With Diabetes "Focus on Technology" conference, taking place from October 24–26 in Anaheim, California. The conference, which will be located at the Disneyland Hotel, will include top experts in the diabetes industry who can "help you and your family gain a better understanding of the technology currently available to people with Type 1 diabetes, as well as technology which may be coming shortly down the road." There wil...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 2, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

Shift Work Tied to Increased Type 2 Diabetes Risk
By Diane Fennell Shift work is linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, according to new research from China. An estimated 25.8 million people in the United States and 108 million people in China now have Type 2, with a predicted total of 380 million people expected to have the condition worldwide by 2025. Previous research has linked shift work to a variety of health problems, including cardiovascular disease, digestive disorders, and certain cancers, as well as to both reduced glucose tolerance and an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes in women. The results regarding diabetes, however, have been incons...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - August 1, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

I've Said It Before…
By Scott Coulter I read today that the GOP is pretty much set to sue Obama. Now, I don't want to get into the politics of that here — let's not get into who did what, who's right, who's wrong, or any of that. Read any comments section in any online paper and you see how quickly things devolve to vitriol, mudslinging, name-calling, and personal attacks. Let's just say this: When one branch of our government is literally SUING the leader of the other party, the system has broken. It isn't "in trouble," it isn't "off balance," it's broken. What happened? We've never agreed on everything, but we were never SUPPOSED to a...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 31, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

School Lunch Truce?
By Quinn Phillips Earlier this month here at Diabetes Flashpoints, we discussed an effort led by some Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives to scale back the school-lunch nutrition standards that Congress mandated as part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Those standards — which cover all food sold in schools during regular hours and impose limits on fat, sodium, and sugar content — have come under fire from food industry–backed groups and many school cafeteria workers, who blame them for a drop in school-lunch sales since they went into effect in 2012. Because of this drop in sales...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 30, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Quinn Phillips Source Type: blogs

Bang for Your Self-Management Buck
By David Spero You can't learn all the steps required to manage diabetes at once. Whether you're experienced or a newbie, what do you focus on now and what do you get to later? One way to decide is to ask, "What activity will give me the most bang for the buck?" "Bang for the buck" means comparing. How much benefit will you get out of something versus how much it will cost you? With self-management, the benefits can include feeling better, being healthier, and having lower glucose and blood pressure numbers. The costs can be financial (like paying for strips and drugs), effort (like learning to prepare new foods), time (li...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 30, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Making the Most of Your Diabetes Doctor Visit
By Betsy Carlisle The average routine doctor visit unfortunately lasts only about 15 minutes these days. Therefore, if you want to get the most out of your appointment, you've got to be proactive. By preparing beforehand and actively participating during your visit, you can be successful in achieving and sustaining great control of your diabetes. What to do before your doctor visit Start communicating with your doctor several days before your appointment by sending your blood glucose log via fax, e-mail, or regular mail. This provides the opportunity for your doctor to look it over prior to the appointment. Highlight any b...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 29, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Betsy Carlisle Source Type: blogs

Which Butter (or Spread) Is Better?
By Amy Campbell The world of nutrition is often confusing, even for dietitians and other nutrition experts. Debates (and bickering) rage on about which diet is best for weight loss, how much carbohydrate a person with diabetes should have, and what kind of fat is best to eat. It's not so easy these days to choose a spread for your morning toast or your baked potato. Years ago, folks had pretty much two choices: butter and margarine. Today, we have butter, light butter, whipped butter, stick margarine, vegetable oil spread, margarine with phytosterols, margarine with yogurt, and vegan margarine (just to name a few). How do ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - July 28, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

"Our Everyday Heroes" Race Car Design Contest for JDRF
By Web Team Want to raise money for JDRF, the leading global organization funding Type 1 diabetes research, and make a child's dreams come true at the same time? Then you'll want to check out the "Our Everyday Heroes" Race Car Design Contest for JDRF! The contest, which is hosted by Motorcraft/Quick Lane Tire and Auto Centers, encourages children ages 5–18 who have Type 1 diabetes to create a design for a drag race funny car. In the first round of the contest, which is open now, members of the community have the opportunity to vote for their favorite design by making a contribution to JDRF. A second round of votin...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 22, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

Diabetes Developed at Midlife May Affect Brain Function in Old Age
By Diane Fennell Developing Type 2 diabetes during middle age can affect mental function in later years by shrinking the brain, according to research recently published in the journal Neurology. Approximately 26 million people in the United States have Type 2 diabetes, while another 79 million have prediabetes and are at increased risk of developing Type 2. To determine the associations of Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure with mental function, researchers looked at 1,437 adults with a median age of 80 years who did not have dementia. Using medical records, the participants were placed into three groups: those who...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 21, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

What's In the Future?
By Scott Coulter When I was in high school, I struggled with a feeling of being weak. In particular, I really felt that having diabetes made me biologically "unfit," unable to survive without assistance, sickly, and overly dependent on outside help. I looked around at my friends and thought, "if the world descends into anarchy tomorrow, they'll all be able to hold on and survive, at least a little while, and I won't." I know, I know — worrying about survivability in the apocalypse isn't exactly rational, and it's not like my friends were a bunch of survivalists — they probably wouldn't last more than a minute. ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 20, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

Five Environmental Causes of Diabetes
By David Spero Type 2 diabetes is usually blamed on people's genes or their behavior, not on the environment. But diabetes rates are soaring worldwide. Genes could not change that fast. Here are five ways environmental changes are causing diabetes. This information is updated from my book Diabetes: Sugar-Coated Crisis, published in 2007. Since then, things have changed, mostly for the worse. Hopefully, knowing how the environment makes people sick will help you protect yourself against it. Unhealthful food. People were not made to eat large quantities of refined carbohydrates — the "white things," such as sweets, br...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 19, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Your Chance to Be on TV!
By Web Team Do you have Type 2 diabetes and use Level Foods products to help manage your condition? Are you in the New York City area? Then you have the opportunity to be interviewed this week for a feature on Level Foods that will air on a major television network this coming April! If you are interested, please send an e-mail to georgie@bigcouchmedia.com. ------------------------ Copyright (C) 2014 R.A. Rapaport Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved. See http://www.DiabetesSelfManagement.com/Terms/ for terms and conditions of reuse. (Source: Diabetes Self-Management)
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 19, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

(Un)healthy States of America
By Quinn Phillips As we've discussed in the past here at Diabetes Flashpoints, the United States is, by many measures, the unhealthiest country in the developed world. Some, but certainly not all, of the blame for America's higher rate of health problems can be attributed to the high rate of obesity in the United States: 33% of Americans are obese, compared with 27% of Britons and Australians, 22% of Belgians and Norwegians, and 18% of Danes and Swiss (and only 5% of Japanese). As we noted in a piece a few years back called "Southern Girth," obesity is not uniformly distributed across the United States. Now, a new survey s...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 19, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Quinn Phillips Source Type: blogs

No, This Is Not What "Spring Forward" Means
By Jan Chait It was another exciting night in the Chait household. One minute I was watching TV; the next, I was watching the floor fly up to smack me in the face. "Jan," I said to myself, "you're supposed to lean back in a recliner — not lean forward." And then I proceeded to get up onto my scooter. Not always easy. This room serves two purposes: It's a TV room and it's my office. In other words, it's a bit crowded in here, and I can't park my scooter perpendicular to the front of the chair as usual. Due to the location of the recliner, the scooter seat is closest to the chair. I managed to turn the seat around, kin...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 18, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jan Chait Source Type: blogs

Unconventional Ways to Lose Weight…Maybe
By Amy Campbell America's quest to lose weight continues. As a nation, we're heavier than ever and just as eager to shed those pounds quickly and painlessly. More than 30% of US adults are obese; this statistic is the same as it was 10 years ago, so things aren't getting much better. There's a clear link between being overweight or obese and Type 2 diabetes, and excess weight is linked with many other health conditions, as well. Losing weight is hard and keeping the weight off is harder. And while the concept of being "fit and fat" has taken hold, the reality is that obese people who are deemed to be "metabolically healthy...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 17, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

The Faces of Diabetes
By Web Team Feeling alone in dealing with your diabetes? Then you'll want to check out Faces of Diabetes, a photography project by Edward Fieder. Fieder, who has Type 1 diabetes, started the Faces of Diabetes Web site "so that people with diabetes, no matter their location, can come together to share their stories and experiences." The site includes a gallery of faces, along with stories of how diabetes has affected the lives of those pictured. Want to be a part of the site? Then send an e-mail to TheFacesofDiabetes@gmail.com describing how having the condition has affected your life, along with a photo of yourself. I...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 15, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

Many Americans Taking Meds That Work Against Each Other
By Diane Fennell Roughly 75% of older Americans have multiple chronic conditions, and more than 20% of them are taking medicines that work at cross-purposes — improving one of their conditions while worsening another — according to new a new study in the journal PLoS One. To determine the prevalence of this "therapeutic competition," researchers from Connecticut and Oregon looked at 5,815 adults age 65 and older in the United States. Using Medicare claims and in-person interviews, the study authors identified 14 of the most common chronic conditions treated with at least one medicine, along with medication c...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 14, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

Credit Where Credit Is Due
By Scott Coulter It's amazing how easy it is for us to deny ourselves the credit we deserve. I'm horrible about this! I shame myself so easily, it's ridiculous. And I'm far too hard on myself MOST of the time. I've always known this, and yet continue to do it more often than I want to admit (pardon me while I shame myself over my bad habit of shaming myself...). What got me started on this topic? I'm listening to a recording I made recently as I write this (just a demo recording, nothing major), pleasantly surprised with the way I played on it. I'm surprised, because I usually HATE hearing myself recorded. I usually avoid ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 13, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

What's Your Diabetes Strong Point?
By David Spero What about diabetes do you do best? If you were going help teach a diabetes self-management class, what would you be most qualified to teach? Let's share our strong points. How are you with food? The demands of eating a healthful "diabetes diet" drive some people pretty mad. Counting carbs and measuring portions may be skills you're good at, or you may have learned how to do without them. How are you at reading food labels? Could you teach us the best ways to use those labels? One good way is not to eat anything with a label, but that doesn't work for everyone. Coping with food choices is another major issu...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 12, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Canned vs. Fresh vs. Frozen
By Diane Fennell Hardly anyone, least of all anyone with diabetes, hasn't heard the message: Eat more fruits and vegetables. Consuming a hefty dose of produce is recommended by virtually every medical and nutritional organization, for benefits ranging from cancer protection to aid in weight loss and maintenance. But some of the common advice on how to increase your fruit and vegetable intake — visit farmers' markets; shop around the outside (rather than in the center) of the grocery store — ignores the possibility of consuming produce largely in canned rather than fresh or frozen form. And in today's freshness-...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 12, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

Six Fish Facts to Know Now
By Amy Campbell We've been hearing for a long time now that fish and other types of seafood are good for us. Current recommendations tell us to aim to eat "two fish meals a week." But fish has some fishy aspects to it, like mercury. And what about all that cholesterol in shellfish? Do fish sticks count towards your two weekly fish meals? Let's find out the facts about fish. Fish fact #1: Frozen fish can be just as good as fresh fish. Frozen fish has often been frozen on the boat right after being caught. The flash-freezing process that's used keeps the fish at temperatures lower than your home freezer. Some "fresh" fish, o...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 11, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

Taking an Unwelcome Guest Along for a Visit
By Jan Chait I went to Texas to get away from winter but, as it turned out, I took winter with me. The cold came along. The ice came along. Even some snow followed me there. The daughter of the house had come home for the weekend, but had to leave early to get back to campus in Waco before the worst stuff hit. She later sent video of herself scraping a passel of ice off her car. All kinds of creatures were seeking warmth. Even Thor, a Siberian Husky, stayed inside for the most part and one lone scorpion tried to sneak in to soak up some heat. Thor, who had never met me before, greeted me as soon as Nancy and I pulled into...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 10, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jan Chait Source Type: blogs

Resources for Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month
By Web Team Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States among cancers that affect both men and women, and people with diabetes are known to have an increased risk of developing the condition. In recognition of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, which is dedicated to spreading awareness about preventing and treating this condition, we'd like to present the following resources: This page from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention includes information about reducing your risk of colorectal cancer, symptoms of the condition, resources that can help pay for screening tests, qu...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 8, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

Saturated Fat Linked to Accumulation of Dangerous Belly Fat
By Diane Fennell Eating saturated fat leads to the accumulation of more visceral fat and less muscle mass than eating polyunsaturated fat, according to new research published in the journal Diabetes. Visceral fat, a dangerous type of abdominal fat that wraps itself around the internal organs, has been linked to metabolic disturbances such as Type 2 diabetes. Saturated fat is known to raise blood cholesterol levels, increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke. This type of fat is found mostly in animal foods, including meat and dairy products, as well as in many baked goods and fried foods. Polyunsaturated fats, on t...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 7, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

The Problem With the Problems With Obamacare
By Scott Coulter That's not a typo you read. I want to talk about the problem with how we talk about the problems with Obamacare. I know this is a topic not directly tied to diabetes, but health insurance, and our rather precarious health-care system, certainly has a LARGE impact on all of us living with this preexisting condition. And so the debate on Obamacare, or the Affordable Care Act as it's actually called, is something I've tried my best to follow. Here's the issue: It seems like we are almost incapable of addressing the problems in any way that can lead to anything constructive. It seems to me that what we have is...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 6, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

Diabetes or Weight — Which Comes First?
By David Spero "Everybody knows" that being fat leads to Type 2 diabetes, even though it's not true. That idea has been pretty well debunked. Reporting on a study in The Journal of the American Medical Association, Diane Fennell wrote "General measures of obesity, such as body-mass index, total body fat, or [fat under the skin] were not associated with an increased risk of developing Type 2." What seems more likely is that Type 2 diabetes makes people fat. The connection is insulin resistance. Nurse practitioner Laurie Klipfel writes, "Even thin people who are insulin resistant are at risk for the things associated with ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 5, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Exercise and Sleep
By Quinn Phillips It's no secret that exercise has extensive benefits for people with diabetes: improving insulin sensitivity, lowering heart disease risk, and helping maintain weight loss, among others. But while any exercise may be good from a health perspective, in reality many people can be very particular about when they exercise. Some people may find that a morning workout gives them an all-day energy boost, while others might spend the day fatigued by the same workout. So a new study that claims evening exercise doesn't harm sleep may leave many people skeptical. Published last month by the journal Sleep Medicine, t...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 5, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Quinn Phillips Source Type: blogs

Oral Insulin Study for Those at Risk of Type 1
By Web Team Do you have Type 1 diabetes? If so, your relatives may be interested in an actively recruiting TrialNet study that is testing whether oral insulin can prevent or delay the development of Type 1 in people who are at increased risk of the condition. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet is "an international network of researchers who are exploring ways to prevent, delay, and reverse the progression of Type 1 diabetes." Type 1 is an autoimmune condition in which the body's immune system creates proteins, known as antibodies, that destroy the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. People who have relatives with Type 1...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 4, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

Are Endocrine Disruptors Disrupting Your Life?
By Amy Campbell I've been seeing a lot of references to "endocrine disruptors" lately, and not in scientific journals, but rather in magazines and online newsletters. If you're scratching your head and wondering what the heck an endocrine disruptor is, well, you're not alone. The term may not be a topic of dinnertime conversation yet, but it's something to get familiar with. What are endocrine disruptors? According to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, or NIEHS (part of the National Institutes of Health), "endocrine disruptors are chemicals that may interfere with the body's endocrine system and produ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 3, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Amy Campbell Source Type: blogs

2014 Weekend for Women
By Web Team If you're a woman with diabetes, you won't want to miss the 2014 Weekend for Women in Washington, DC, organized by the nonprofit group DiabetesSisters. Scheduled for April 25–27, the Weekend for Women conference aims to "educate, inspire, and transform women's view of their diabetes so that they can live full, happy lives with the disease." The weekend includes a variety of educational and social events, such as breakout sessions featuring diabetes experts, a lunch/dinner program dedicated to celebrating the strength of women living with diabetes, a "Partners Perspective Program" for the partners of th...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - March 1, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Web Team Source Type: blogs

Study Links Pollutants, Metabolic Complications; Glucose Meter Recall
By Diane Fennell Study Links Pollutants, Metabolic Complications A type of environmental contaminant known as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is associated with the development of certain metabolic complications of obesity such as Type 2 diabetes, according to researchers from the University of Bergen in Norway. Previous studies have highlighted potential links between diabetes and a variety of chemicals, including bishphenol-A, phthalates, air pollutants, and perflourinated compounds (PFCs). Although there is a strong association between obesity and conditions such as insulin resistance and Type 2 diabetes, there ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 28, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Diane Fennell Source Type: blogs

It's the Season
By Scott Coulter Most of you have probably never heard of Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado. Heck, the computer just underlined “Naropa” to inform me I misspelled something! But it’s a real place. It’s where my mother taught for many years, and where I spent a lot of time as a youngster. It’s a wonderful place, founded in the mid-70’s by a Tibetan Buddhist scholar and former monk. As with any institution, there’s a whole backstory, some of it good, noble, and inspiring, some of it shady and disconcerting. But that’s not the point I’m bringing up. I mainly bring th...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 27, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

Farewell to Rachel
By David Spero My mother-in-law died last week. It wasn't a tragedy. She was 93 years old and died peacefully in her sleep, without apparent pain. But it got me thinking about death and other scary things. Rachel was living in a board and care facility 60 miles away when she died. For various reasons, including my own disability, she couldn't stay with us. We couldn't afford four-star care, but the staff was very caring and skillful. She actually got to do more socializing and seemed less lonely than she had before she got there. She made two friends and the three of them had all their meals together and hung out in their...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 26, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

Seasonal Eating
By Quinn Phillips Quick: what local produce is in season right now? Most Americans probably couldn't answer that question. After all, with refrigeration and cargo jets, it's no longer necessary — or even common — to eat primarily produce that is in season locally. Chances are good, this time of year, that the fresh berries, greens, tomatoes, and peppers in your local supermarket come not from a nearby greenhouse, but from a farm located in a warmer climate hundreds or even thousands of miles away. And, of course, certain warm-weather produce — like bananas, oranges, and pineapples — is never in seas...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 26, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Quinn Phillips Source Type: blogs

Getting a Foot Up On Diabetes Care
By Jan Chait "Check your feet." How many times have we heard it? Many times, however, that's all we're told: Check your feet. What am I looking for? What do I do if I find it?! And, come to think of it, why am I checking my feet? Furthermore, they tell us, put lotion on our feet, but not between our toes. Huh? Why not? It's a puzzlement. So I asked my podiatrist, Ken Krueger, DPM, to 'splain some of this stuff. What we're looking for are things such as: • A red spot • A crack or opening in the skin • A blister • Any drainage (or odor) • Any change in skin color "All of these are signs of an in...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - February 25, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Jan Chait Source Type: blogs

A New Year
By Scott Coulter This is the second blog entry I wrote for this week. I'm scrapping the first one. You see, I watched a documentary on the "workings of the universe" and got myself inspired to write a flowing, philosophical post about the vastness of time and space, the insignificance of people, why we should all come together and get along... Not bad stuff, but after rereading it, I think it missed the mark. That entry read like a long prose about grand concepts. And I thought that would be good for New Year's — you know, dreaming big, looking ahead. But dreaming big is not a problem for me. It's not a problem for ...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - January 2, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Scott Coulter Source Type: blogs

Why All the Drama?
By David Spero Have you noticed how people need drama in their lives? If they don't have anything to worry about, they create something. People with diabetes don't have to create. Diabetes brings plenty of drama. But is drama good or bad? If it's bad, how can we get rid of it? Why do people pull for drama in their lives? Drama is defined by Google as "an exciting, emotional, or unexpected series of events or set of circumstances." So drama makes our lives more interesting. If we're bored or we feel there's no point, having some excitement and emotion might pick our lives up a bit. Did you ever wonder why Oprah Winfrey's w...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - January 1, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: David Spero Source Type: blogs

High Spending, Poor Results
By Quinn Phillips Last week, Diabetes Flashpoints looked at how health insurance in the United States operates, compared with several other rich countries. The United States is notable both for its widespread reliance on employer-provided insurance, and for its wide variety of insurance types for different groups within the country — in most developed countries, young children and seniors, the rich and the poor, are covered by the same system. So what does our hodgepodge of systems in the United States cost, and what outcomes does it create? The data paint a picture that isn't very pretty. There are two ways to measu...
Source: Diabetes Self-Management - January 1, 2014 Category: Diabetes Authors: Quinn Phillips Source Type: blogs