Protection for Nursing Home Residents: Will New Rules Remain?
Credit: iStock  New rules for the protection of nursing home residents have been implemented as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Many of these rules provide answers to concerns that have troubled families with loved ones living in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), generally called nursing homes. I emailed Medicare expert Ginalisa Monterroso for an update on these rules and what they mean for nursing home residents and their... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 9, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Celebrating Love: Dementia Caregivers Speak Up
Credit: Thinkstock  Valentine’s Day, anniversaries, and birthdays have traditionally been celebrated with balloons, gifts, cards, parties, and food. Sadly, when dementia enters into the picture, such general mayhem may overwhelm a person already confused by his or her surroundings. Even attempting to celebrate love can become a challenge. The choice about whether or not to mark special days is often fraught with pain for the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - February 6, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer ’ s Documentary Sparks Controversy Over What Some See as Negativity
Credit: Thinkstock  According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 5 million people in the U.S. live with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and the price tag for the disease in 2016 was over $236 billion. Therefore, it isn’t surprising that the disease is often featured on news broadcasts and as a topic of documentaries.  PBS has been particularly attentive to the issues of AD. In 2012, PBS aired a moving... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 31, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Using Physical Therapy to Achieve the Best Version of You
Credit: Thinkstock  As people age, they are likely to find that balance issues, arthritis, neurological diseases, and other health problems become a threat to their quality of life. People facing these problems often find that being evaluated and treated by a physical therapist can be a significant step toward improvement in safety and mobility, or at least stabilization.  Caroline DeGroot, Master of Physical Therapy (MPT), is a... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 16, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Midlife Exercise May Have Beneficial Effects on Brain Later in Life
Credit: Thinkstock  Once you’ve reach your 70s, will you look back and thank your middle-aged self for spending another hour each day on social media rather than jogging around your neighborhood? According to new research, the answer is no: you’re more likely to wish that you’d had more self-discipline.  A long-term study of more than 3,000 twins by researchers at the University of Helsinki found that midlife,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 10, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Do You Need a Specialist for a Dementia Diagnosis?
   Credit: Thinkstock  For many adult children and spouses, it’s difficult to convince a parent or mate to stay current with the medical appointments needed for checkups and medication renewals. If specialists are required, that generally means more waiting, more testing, and more visits. All of these appointments are time-consuming and frequently frustrating, which all too often leads to delaying the appointments... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - January 4, 2017 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Needs of 'Elder Orphans' a Growing Concern in Aging Population
Credit: Thinkstock  " Elder orphan " is a term used by medical professionals to describe individuals living alone with little to no support system. In a research article published in Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research, in July 2016,  " Elder Orphans Hiding in Plain Sight: A Growing Vulnerable Population, " Maria T. Carney, M.D., and her colleagues, sought to help clinicians identify adults with multiple chronic diseases who... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - December 20, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's: What Is Really in Your Control?
Credit: Thinkstock  When it comes to Alzheimer's Disease (AD), the sad reality is that there is no cure. But a significant number of people have an increased risk due to genetics, and everyone has an increased risk as they age.  According to the Alzheimer’s Association, of the more than five million Americans with Alzheimer's, approximately 200,000 individuals develop the disease before age 65 (younger-onset Alzheimer's... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - December 13, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Is Our Youth-Obsessed Culture Making You Old Before Your Time?
Credit: Thinkstock  Look young! Feel young! Think young! The constant barrage of information about how being forever young is the only desirable way to live is enough to make even a young person feel old. Now researchers have shown that this ageism is potentially harmful to one's cognitive abilities over the long term.  A study led by Becca R. Levy, PhD of Yale University and her colleagues has shown that our memory is actually... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - December 5, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Caffeine May Lower Risk for Cognitive Decline, Study Suggests
Credit: Thinkstock  Throughout the last several decades, caffeine has been alternately touted as hero or villain. For a time, caffeine was blamed for birth defects in children, and healthy eating, in general, meant eliminating food or beverages containing caffeine. Still, one of the most explosive new trends we’ve seen over the last dozen years has been designer coffee shops and kiosks, which show that people will not... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - November 15, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

You Are Not Alone: Caregivers Share Their Experiences and Insights
Credit: Thinkstock  Long-term caregiving can be isolating and lonely, which is why peer support is so vital to a caregiver’s mental, emotional, and physical health. More than a decade ago, I searched for other caregivers with whom I could share my journey and discovered that connecting was difficult. This experience led me to write “Minding Our Elders: Caregivers Share their Personal Stories.”  Thankfully,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - November 7, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Gene Therapy Delivered by Modified Virus Provides Hope for Cure Prior to Symptoms
Credit: Thinkstock  According to the Alzheimer’s Association’s 2016 figures, five million American’s are living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Alzheimer’s is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. Additionally, this year Alzheimer’s and other dementias will cost the U.S. $236 billion, not to mention the over $18 billion of unpaid care provided by unpaid family caregivers (2015... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - November 2, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Reversing Alzheimer ’ s: Lifestyle Plan Shows Promise
Credit: Thinkstock  It’s been said that once you know one person with Alzheimer’s, you know one person with Alzheimer’s. In other words: people are unique, and not everyone will respond to a particular treatment. This truth was highlighted in a study based on the combined efforts of the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and UCLA Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research.  In the study,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - October 19, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's: Leaky Blood-Brain Barrier One More Step in Understanding Development of Disease
Credit: Thinkstock  The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a collection of cells and cellular components that line the walls of blood vessels in the brain. This barrier is an important part of brain health because it separates the brain from circulating blood. A study led by Walter H. Backes, Ph.D., a professor in medical physics at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands, has found that the blood-brain... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - October 4, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Long-term Testing May Speed Early Treatment of Alzheimer ’ s Disease
Credit: Thinkstock  Scientists at the University of Edinburgh’s Centre for Cognitive and Neural Systems have found evidence that long-term testing starting well before any signs of Alzheimer’s symptoms are evident could be a valuable tool in detecting which people will need intervention with therapeutic drugs that are now in clinical trials. This type of intervention could possibly halt or even reverse cognitive... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - September 22, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Family Caregivers are the Heart of Alzheimer's Care
Credit: Thinkstock  According to the Alzheimer’s Association, in 2015 nearly 16 million family and other unpaid caregivers for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias provided an estimated 18.1 billion hours of unpaid care, a contribution to the nation valued at $221.3 billion. This is with caregiving being valued at only $12.25 per hour. Similar statistics are posted by the International Alliance of... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - September 12, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Optimistic Thinking May Help Preserve Memory and Judgement
Credit: Thinkstock  It should come as no surprise that optimistic thinking is, for the most part, better for one’s health than negative thinking.  In fact, negative thinking has been connected to poor health for some time. A recent study confirms what was previously suspected, linking optimistic thinking to the preservation of memory and good judgement. Both of those traits bode well for staving off, if not preventing,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - September 7, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

People with Dementia Are Often Undertreated for Pain
Credit: Thinkstock  When people lose their ability to articulate what is causing them pain, this pain is often overlooked by doctors.  A recent Slovenian study presented at the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) in Copenhagen and conducted by Dr. Martin Rakusa investigated this problem. It involved 452 patients with an average age of 65 who had been treated for diabetes over a period of many years.  Some 44... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 26, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Is Forgetfulness A Precursor of Alzheimer ’ s?
Credit: Thinkstock  Millions of aging boomers wonder if their memory lapses are from normal aging, or a sign that they are developing Alzheimer’s. There’s some basis for the worry. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, more than 5 million people in the U.S. are living with it. One in three seniors will die with Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia.  While these statistics are scary, you shouldn't let... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 16, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Ancient Technique Shown to Alter Brains of People with MCI
Credit: Thinkstock In an example of ancient meeting modern, researchers at UCLA and their colleagues tested whether or not yoga and meditation could alter the brains of some people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to help them think more clearly. MCI is often a very early stage of Alzheimer's disease. Their answer was yes.  A technique using a yoga pose while mediating was shown by modern methods to be as effective as memory... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 10, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Toronto AD Convention: Where You Work Matters
Credit: Thinkstock  The latest research released at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto suggests that people who work closely with fellow humans, rather than machines or data, may be better positioned to manage the onset of Alzheimer's.  The study data shows that a cognitively stimulating lifestyle may even counteract the negative cognitive effects of an unhealthy diet, which has been associated with... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 1, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Toronto AD Convention: Where Your Work Matters
Credit: Thinkstock  The latest research released at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Toronto suggests that people who work closely with fellow humans, rather than machines or data, may be better positioned to manage the onset of Alzheimer's.  The study data shows that a cognitively stimulating lifestyle may even counteract the negative cognitive effects of an unhealthy diet, which has been associated with... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 1, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Monitor Your Blood Pressure to Avoid Vascular Dementia
Credit: Thinkstock  If the risk of a stroke or heart attack doesn’t scare us into controlling our blood pressure, surely a heightened risk for vascular dementia should. While Alzheimer’s is consented by experts as the most common form of dementia, vascular dementia follows closely behind in ranking. The two mixed together are also common, so we should consider ourselves at risk for dementia unless we have a healthy... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 27, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Group Activities Reduce Depression among Older Population
Credit: Masterfile Images   When our elders are suffering from physical pain, mental stress, loneliness or the effects of ageism in our society, the result can be depression. Research done at Sweden’s Umeå University and reported on by Medical News Today finds that when group activities were introduced into the elders’ environments, depressive symptoms were often improved and the need for medication reduced or... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 12, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer ’ s Symptoms: Navigational Skills May Deteriorate Long Before Memory
Credit: Thinkstock   Typically, when we think of the early signs of Alzheimer & rsquo;s disease we think of memory problems. Words go missing, names escape one's grasp, daily tasks are forgotten. Now, researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have shown that making mental maps of where we have been and where we are going is a process the brain may lose before memory problems begin to show. People with these early symptoms can no... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 6, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Study: Omega-3 Fatty Acids Can Reverse Fructose Damage
This study shows that omega-3 fatty acids, known as docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, seem to reverse the harmful, genetic changes caused by fructose. DHA is found... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 22, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Driving and Memory Loss: Tips to Help Elders Give Up Driving
Credit: Thinkstock   For many of us, a car is a sign of independence. But this emotional connection to our automobiles is part of what makes convincing a person that he or she is no longer capable of driving such a volatile battle. The longer adult children or others wait to discuss driving issues with a loved one, the harder it can be.   Occasionally, people in the earlier stages of cognitive or physical decline will recognize the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 7, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

June is Brain Awareness Month: Helping Caregivers Cope
Credit: Thinkstock   June is Alzheimer's and Brain Awareness month. What better time to become educated about how to help people who have dementia live a better quality of life, help caregivers with support and resources, and teach others about the many types of dementia and other brain diseases?   The National Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) was signed into law in 2011. Since that time, milestones have been identified to meet the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 31, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer's Disease Impairs Insulin Signaling, May Increase Diabetes Risk
Credit: Thinkstock   According to the latest research, the long-held theory that diabetes may cause Alzheimer’s could prove to be the reverse, at least in some cases.   In the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia, scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai published study results suggesting that Alzheimer’s disease (AD) impairs insulin signaling in the area of the brain that is responsible for regulating... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 23, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Insulin Resistance Puts Women More at Risk of Alzheimer's Than Men
Credit: Thinkstock   For many reasons, some identified and others still a mystery, women seem to be more at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease than men are. A recent study, led by Dr. Laura Ekblad at Finland's University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, has discovered one physical issue that could be added to the list of Alzheimer's risks for women: insulin resistance.    Insulin resistance, which is a... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 17, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer ’ s: Frequent Relocations May Speed Decline
Credit: Thinkstock   Specialized care is needed at different stages of dementia. Frequently, the only way to provide that kind of care is to move the person to either a memory unit or a family home, while supplementing care provided by family members with paid in-home caregivers. In many cases, it & rsquo;s simply unrealistic to expect to never have to relocate someone who has dementia.     At the same time, frequently moving... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 10, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer’s: Frequent Relocations May Speed Decline
Credit: Thinkstock   Specialized care is needed at different stages of dementia. Frequently, the only way to provide that kind of care is to move the person to either a memory unit or a family home, while supplementing care provided by family members with paid in-home caregivers. In many cases, it’s simply unrealistic to expect to never have to relocate someone who has dementia.     At the same time, frequently moving... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 10, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Burning Calories May Increase Gray Matter
Credit: Thinkstock   We are made to move. Increasing the amount of physical exercise in our lives can help us maintain a healthy weight, prevent heart disease, and simply make us feel better. Exercise has also repeatedly been shown to help maintain a healthy brain. Most recently, according to the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, a study led by Cyrus Raji, MD, PhD, at UCLA, added significantly more value to existing information about... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - May 3, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Hearing Loss Can Hasten Brain Function Decline in Aging Adults
Increasingly, studies are showing that hearing loss is not simply an inconvenient part of the aging process. Hearing loss can have serious effects on the aging brain health. As with many health issues, early intervention may be able to prevent damage as well as ease frustration.   Hearing experts at Johns Hopkins University found in one study that hearing loss may come with some serious long-term consequences to healthy brain... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 25, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

The Root of Alzheimer's: Could Infection and Inflammation be Part of the Equation?
  When it comes to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of researchers think that it’s time to reconsider the idea of infection as a root cause. Scientists are now pointing to studies that reveal the presence of a microbe as a possible trigger for the disease. The theory is that microbes "find their way into the brain via the bloodstream and lie dormant until triggered by aging, immune system decline or by different types of... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 18, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

Deep Brain Stimulation Research Expands for Alzheimer's
A procedure that that is already being used for the treatment of some brain diseases is receiving increased attention as a possible treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. Called deep brain stimulation (DBS), an implanted neurostimulator delivers electrical signals that help regulate abnormal signals in the brain caused by the disease.     In the U.S., DBS is currently only approved for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - April 14, 2016 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack, Minding Our Elders Source Type: blogs

People with Down Syndrome Heroes for Alzheimer’s Research
People with Down syndrome have become one of our most important groups of volunteers for Alzheimer’s testing. Fortunately, many are more than willing to give their time and undergo some medical procedures in order to help others.   Down syndrome is caused by the presence of an extra copy of chromosome 21. The genes on this chromosome are the same genes that control the production of the substance that forms the amyloid plaques... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 28, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caregivers Study is Recruiting
The University of Maryland is conducting an online study for caregivers. The purpose of the study is to learn more about the experiences and needs of caregivers, who are often overlooked. If you provide daily care for a loved one, you may be able to take part in the study. Or if a loved one takes care of you on a daily basis, they may qualify to participate.   For more information see the recruitment notice: (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 25, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Living with Alzheimer’s: PBS Documentary, Glen Campbell Tour
When a loved one receives an Alzheimer’s diagnosis the whole family is affected. For most, the first stage is utter devastation. Yet the human spirit can be incredibly resilient. After going through the grieving process, the person diagnosed with the disease and his or her loved ones most often come to accept their altered life as a new normal.    Many people do more than just soldier on. They go to great lengths to show others... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 23, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Denial to Seek Potential Dementia Diagnosis
A recent article in the UK Telegraph reported on a survey showing that two thirds of people over the age of 50 are more afraid of developing dementia than of getting cancer. Other surveys show similar percentages.   One reason for this intense fear of Alzheimer's is obvious. While many types of cancer can be cured, most types of dementia cannot. However, another reason is that the idea of being betrayed by our brains to the point that we... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 18, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Alzheimer’s New Frontier: Brain Cell Transplants, Memory Stimulating Implant Invasive Yet Intriguing
Even the most optimistic of us know that, at this time, there is no reliable way to prevent Alzheimer’s disease and there is no cure. Pharmaceutical companies have committed billions of dollars to study drug therapies that have yet to prove effective. Yes, there are more pharmaceutical approaches in the pipeline, but none of them will be available soon, and there is no guarantee that these drugs are even targeting the correct source of the... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 11, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Fish Oil May Preserve Brain Function, Improve Memory
Newer studies are discovering that the role of fish oil in our diets is broader than once thought. The Omega-3 fatty acids naturally found in fatty fish but often taken in capsule form have long been considered of major importance for heart health. Lately, scientists have discovered that these Omega-3s are of great benefit to our brains, as well, especially as we age.   Researchers from Rhode Island Hospital recently published their... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - August 2, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

3 Triggers for Alcohol Abuse in Elderly
Alcohol abuse can occur at any age, but in the past most doctors looked for the signs in younger people. There’s also a bias in society at large, including some doctors, that people who abuse alcohol will be of a certain type. It can be hard for a doctor to look at a sweet, grandmotherly woman and think that perhaps the “occasional” glass of wine she admits to drinking may actually be a good portion of a bottle on nightly... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 29, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

One in Three Cases of Alzheimer’s May be Lifestyle Related
Scientists who attended the 2014 Alzheimer's Association International Conference in Copenhagen this month seem energized from their collaborative effort. News stories will be filtering out for weeks to come about the studies presented at the conference. However, to me, one of the most interesting and encouraging conclusions so far is that lifestyle changes may hold back Alzheimer’s symptoms for up to 10 years.   Over the last decade,... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 23, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Mind Over Stigma: Now’s the Time to Vote for Your Favorite Anti-stigma Entry
Over the last month, we’ve read inspiring stories on the HealthCentral #LiveBold anti-stigma photo contest  featuring people with serious health issues. These entrants tell how they cope with their disease. They tell how they not only survive but thrive.    Many health issues – Alzheimer’s being prime among them – often are accompanied by the other-imposed stigma of shame. Maybe people are afraid of... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 19, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Where Words Fail Music Speaks
Nearly any of us can experience a strong emotional response upon hearing the first chords of a song from a long-ago time in our lives. While many of us don’t think about this response in detail, Stan Cohen, a former social worker and technology professional did. When he discovered that nursing homes didn’t appear to be using personalized music on iPods for their residents, he decided that something had to be done about the situation.... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 15, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Caregiver Questions for Neurologist Daniel C. Potts
Daniel C. Potts, M.D. is a neurologist, author, educator and champion of those with Alzheimer’s disease as well as their caregivers. Dr. Potts communicates this dedication by being accessible to those of us who represent family caregivers, so I took advantage of his willingness to help by asking him some common questions that many family caregivers face.   CBB: Dr. Potts, unfortunately, there’s still a stigma attached to... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 9, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Delay Alzheimer’s Symptoms by Life-long Learning
Nearly all of us know that if we don’t use our muscles as we age, we’ll lose muscle mass. The same theory seems to hold true when it comes to keeping our minds sharp. Computer games, word games, crossword puzzles, Sudoku and other challenging mental pursuits have been advised as methods of keeping the mind healthy as we age. Now, a recent study has shown that by pursuing life-long learning, even people who are genetically at risk for... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - July 1, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

A4 Study: Testing Solanezumab before Alzheimer’s Symptoms Appear
Healthy older adults with no symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are the focus of a large study involving 61 medical centers across the U.S., Canada and Australia. The Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer’s study aims to find out if Eli Lilly’s solanezumab, which failed in earlier studies to help people with Alzheimer’s symptoms, will help prevent Alzheimer’s if given long before symptoms appear. Solanezumab... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 26, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

“The Longest Day” Project June 21st Challenges People to Act
June 20-21 is the longest day of sunlight for places in the Northern Hemisphere. On this day, teams around the world will participate in The Longest Day event, a sunrise-to-sunset occasion to honor those facing Alzheimer’s – the person with the disease plus the family and caregivers. People living with Alzheimer’s, aware that their minds are betraying them, can suffer from unspeakable fear, agitation, paranoia and other issues... (Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts)
Source: Carol Bradley Bursack's SharePosts - June 17, 2014 Category: Dementia Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs