Justice & George Floyd
When I blogged last month, I thought surely that May would be an improvement over April. I was wrong. Now, with 100k deaths from COVID-19, and after several days of protests across the country in response to the death of George Floyd, I can’t possibly imagine what the summer will be like. I watched two … Continue reading "Justice & George Floyd" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Is Family Presence Safe During the COVID-19 Pandemic?
by Stephen P. Wood, MS, ACNP-BC I stood facing the iPad attached to a rolling stand punching in the phone number of the young granddaughter of my intensive care unit patient. He arrived less than twenty-four hours before. I had taken the call the day before from the outside hospital emergency department and the story was grim. This was a seventy-six-year-old male who had acute myeloid leukemia, hypertension, as well as a history of congestive heart failure. He had been sick for the past two days with a fever, a cough and weakness.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Health Care Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Explaining pandemic triage: When a picture is worth 3000 words
by Leah R. Eisenberg, Joan M. Henriksen, Felicia G. Cohn, Anita J. Tarzian, Theresa S. Drought, Heather Fitzgerald. Art by Cathy Leamy Art by Cathy Leamy Ethics and its implications for healthcare delivery under constraints of scarcity are not simple concepts, even for those working within the healthcare system.  It’s time for ethicists to make a concerted effort to communicate these concepts to a broader public audience. Pandemic triage protocols call for transparency, because it leads to understanding and in this way increases the trust patients and families have in the healthcare system This commitment to tr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #graphicmedicine COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Podcast and Event Summary: New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar: Medically Assisted Dying in Canada: from where we ’ve come; to where we’re heading, presented by Professor Arthur Schafer (Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics, University of Manitoba)
Written by: Dr Amna Whiston In this seminar (available on podcast), Professor Arthur Schafer discussed the ethical challenges involved in the Canadian euthanasia debate at the New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar (online). Professor Schafer, who has written extensively over the last thirty years about a range of topics that includes professional and bio-medical ethics, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Amna Whiston's Posts Audio Files Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Event Summary syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethics of Immortality
Graphic by Sidney Harris  from American ScientistIn these current days of a world-wide pandemic of the deadly COVID-19 virus infectionand as of the origination of this blog thread there is concern as to how long testing for aneffective vaccine wil... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Explaining pandemic triage: When a picture is worth 3000 words
by Leah R. Eisenberg, Joan M. Henriksen, Felicia G. Cohn, Anita J. Tarzian, Theresa S. Drought, Heather Fitzgerald. Art by Cathy Leamy Art by Cathy Leamy Ethics and its implications for healthcare delivery under constraints of scarcity are not simple concepts, even for those working within the healthcare system.  It’s time for ethicists to make a concerted effort to communicate these concepts to a broader public audience. Pandemic triage protocols call for transparency, because it leads to understanding and in this way increases the trust patients and families have in the healthcare system This commitment to tr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #graphicmedicine COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Every State Determines Brain Death Differently. Really.
What does it mean to be dead? You’d think the answer to that question is binary. You are, or you are not dead. But the fact is every state in the United States determines death differently. And when it comes to brain death specifically, the subtle differences can have major consequences for doctors, patients, and their families.  This was a challenge before COVID-19. The pandemic has underscored the already urgent need to reconcile these differences as soon as possible. I joined Jeff Segal, MD, JD on the Medical Liability Minute, to discuss brain death. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Memories of the Spanish Flu by Jerome Lowenstein, MD, Professor of Medicine, NYU Grossman School of Medicine
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Framework for Rationing Ventilators and Critical Care Beds During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Response
by B. Corbett Walsh, MD, MBE; Anna Nolan, MD, MSc As intensivists practicing in New York City at the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a palpable concern that there may not be enough ventilators for every patient that required it. If rationing were to occur, it should utilize a principled morally sound algorithm to aid physicians’ resource allocation decisions. While there has been much written about this timely topic, we would like to focus on a recent manuscript: Drs.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Public Health #bioethicsontheground #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

The Moderna Vaccine Story is a Cautionary Tale for Coronavirus Reporting
by Jamie Webb MA, MSci  ‘An experimental vaccine against the coronavirus showed encouraging results in very early testing, triggering hoped-for immune responses in eight healthy, middle-aged volunteers, its maker announced Monday.’ Readers of the Associated Press’s lead paragraph on Moderna’s vaccine candidate for COVID-19 could be forgiven for getting excited. However, the same article ends with this caveat, “The results have not been published and are only from the first of three stages of testing that vaccines and drugs normally undergo.” Rather than published data, the...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Media #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Model Hospital Policy for Fair Allocation of Medications to Treat COVID-19
To assist hospitals and health systems to implement a transparent and fair approach to allocate scarce medications to treat patients with COVID-19, the University of Pittsburgh Department of Critical Care Medicine has created a model hospital policy and allocation framework.  Hospitals and health systems are welcome to adapt the policy for their specific needs. Click here to download a PDF version of the Model Hospital Policy for Fair Allocation of Medications to Treat COVID-19. Since March 2020, the number of clinical trials to assess the efficacy of medications to treat COVID-19 has expanded rapidly...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Clinicians Have a Moral Duty to Care for All Patients –Including Lockdown Protesters
Protesters questioning the ongoing need for lockdown measures aimed at controlling Covid19 are marching to make their concerns known, in some cases with arms and other military paraphernalia. Some ethicists think these protectors should sign a pledge to forego scarce medical care in the name of their political ideas. We disagree. The post Clinicians Have a Moral Duty to Care for All Patients–Including Lockdown Protesters appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care professional ethics COVID-19 duty to treat Hastings Bioethics Forum lockdown protesters syndicated Source Type: blogs

Lessons Learned and Ignored In a Pandemic
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. In 2009, after an outbreak of H1N1 flu, the Institutes of Medicine (IOM) issued a letter that encouraged all states to begin planning for a pandemic flu. Three years later the IOM expanded their call and asked states to develop crisis standards of care plans. Having worked on the ethical frameworks for pandemic flu for the State of Texas (2010), for crisis standards of care in the state of Illinois (2015), and conducted exercises with the Borough of Brooklyn (2012), these plans considered a number of scenarios from the length of the pandemic, to availability of supplies, to the type of crisis.&helli...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Lessons from Covid-19: Why Treating Sick Patients is Bad Business for Hospitals
Hospitals in the United States are losing money taking care of patients with Covid-19. The pandemic casts a harsh spotlight on the misallocation of health care resources in the U.S. The post Lessons from Covid-19: Why Treating Sick Patients is Bad Business for Hospitals appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care health care reimbursement surprise billing syndicated Source Type: blogs

Mutual Self-Restraint: Social Distancing and COVID-19 in Japan
by Laura Specker Sullivan, Ph.D. and Dan Rosen, J.D. As Fairchild et al. describe in a forthcoming issue of the American Journal of Bioethics, the American debate on social distancing regulations has pitted those protesting unacceptable state limitations on individual rights versus those demanding that individual rights to protection create a government obligation. That the debate over social distancing in the United States is playing out in the space of rights is not surprising; as commentators have noted, recent American social and political discourse is grounded in a tradition of individualism that frequently finds itse...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Decision making Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld Covid-19 antibody testing Social Distancing Source Type: blogs

Court Refuses to Order Treatment for Dead Pregnant Woman Khayla Reno
Several United States jurisdictions (like Nevada) mandate continued organ-sustaining treatment AFTER determination of death when the individual is pregnant and there is some chance to later deliver the baby. This is not the case in the Australian Capi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Hampshire Expands Authority of Healthcare Agents
The New Hampshire health care decisions act prohibits healthcare agents and surrogates from consenting to experimental therapy on behalf of an incapacitated patient. As in many states, this constraint on authority is listed with constraints on the abil... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: The Need for “Emergency Multidisplinary Team Meetings”
by Henri-Corto Stoeklé Ph.D., Asmahane Benmaziane M.D., Philippe Beuzeboc M.D., Christian Hervé, M.D., Ph.D. In a letter published in The American Journal of Bioethics, we wrote “now really isn’t the time for ethical reflections” in the face of COVID-19. This did not mean that nothing should be done to help clinicians in this time. We believe that the development of specific multidisciplinary team meetings (MTMs), well known in oncology, could be vital.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Philosophy & Ethics professional ethics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Video Interview: Past the Peak of the Pandemic: Which Non-Covid-19 Patients Should Get Treatment First?
In the UK we’re past the peak of the coronavirus pandemic but new ethical issues are arising: the healthcare system is now under enormous pressure – it’s working less efficiently than before (because of precautions to protect healthcare personnel), and there’s an enormous backlog of patients whose treatments have been put on hold. Which non-Covid-19 […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health healthcare rationing Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics Rationing/ Resource Allocation syndicated Uncategorized Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Advance Directives During COVID-19 (podcast)
So, you’ve written an advance care directive. You’ve made it clear, you think, about the kinds of medical care you want should you get sick with Covid-19 or you’re in the midst of a medical crisis. Will your wishes be followed?  Art Caplan and I talk with Cathy Wurzer at the End in Mind Project. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dementia Advance Directives – SED by AD
Lamar Hankins has compiled both a good list of dementia directives and a good list of recommended elements of dementia directives. Many of these include provisions that direct stopping eating and drinking. In a recently completed invited book manuscri... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Covid-19 Underscores Racial Disparity in Advance Directives
Older black Americans are half as likely as older whites to have advanced directives. My patient, a black man in his 70s,, first made his wishes known when he was in the hospital with Covid-19. The post Covid-19 Underscores Racial Disparity in Advance Directives appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care advance directives COVID-19 Disparities end of life Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Balancing COVID-19 Quantity and Quality of Care via Geographic Redistribution: A Matter of Social Justice and Pragmatism for New York City
by Joyeeta G Dastidar, MD   In New York City, the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the country with a quarter of the nation’s cases, hospitals prepared for ventilator shortages. This included the development of ventilator allocation guidelines and, in some institutions, appointments of triage allocation committees to help determine who would get a ventilator if there was an inadequate supply of ventilators. While there was much debate and discussion over triage guidelines, ultimately in New York City, due to a lack of supportive legislation at the state or federal levels, resource allocation guidelines and ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Decision making End of Life Care Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Regulation & Law Justice Public Health Social Justice Technology #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

New 2020 Publications from Professor Thaddeus Pope
I am delighted to have recently delivered complete manuscripts for a number of invited and planned publications. In addition, I list my articles and books that have already been published in 2020. My key objective for June is completing "From Informed Consent to Shared Decision Making: Improving Patient Safety and Reducing Medical Liability Risk with Patient Decision Aids." FORTHCOMING IN 2020 Is There a Right to Delay Determination of Death by Neurologic Criteria? JAMA NEUROLOGY (forthcoming 2020) (with Ariane Lewis, and Richard J. Bonnie). Brain Death: Status Shift and Implications, AMA JOURNAL OF ETHICS (forth...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 26, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: Think First, Act Better Later
by Fernando Hellmann, Ph.D.,  Silvia Cardoso Bittencourt, Ph.D., Fabíola Stolf Brzozowski, Ph.D., Mirelle Finkler, Ph.D.,  Marta Verdi, Sandra Caponi, Ph.D. In times of crisis, like the current pandemic of COVID-19, the perception that ethical standards can be relaxed due to the urgent need for solutions is growing, according to Stoeklé and Hervé. For them, “Ethics is only useful if you have the time, and right now, time is exactly what we do not have.” It is a misperception without any doubts.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Decision making Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Oklahoma Limits Guardian Authority for DNR
Last Monday, the Governor of Oklahoma signed H.B 2588, which limits the power of guardians to authorize DNR orders without specific court approval.  In response to the high profile debacle of guardian Rebecca Fierle, Florida enacted similar legis... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 25, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Texas Physician Sued for Withdrawing Life Support without Following TADA Procedures
Scores of legislative bills and a dozen lawsuits have questioned whether the Texas Advance Directives Act affords adequate procedural due process. One such case is now pending before the Texas Court of Appeal.  But a new lawsuit alleges that a p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Strong and Faithful Healthcare Agents Advocate for the Patient
I have written a lot about "bad" surrogates, those who make treatment decisions for incapacitated patients that those patients would not have made for themselves. Therefore, it was a delight to see this movie scene depicting a strong and faithful heal... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Report from Sub-Saharan Africa: “When the Health Fundamentals are Weak, Covid Will Expose You.”
The cries of millions of people in Sub-Saharan Africa and in low- and middle-income countries elsewhere who are struggling to stay alive because of Covid-19 and the lockdowns call for us to revisit the conceptual framework of the human right to health. The post Report from Sub-Saharan Africa: “When the Health Fundamentals are Weak, Covid Will Expose You.” appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 global health Hastings Bioethics Forum human rights syndicated World Health Organization Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Testing – Consent or No Consent?
I have a guest editorial in the June 2020 American Journal of Bioethics. Fifteen articles discuss whether clinicians should get consent for brain death testing.  Brain Death Testing: Time for National UniformityThaddeus Mason Pope Legal and Ethical Considerations for Requiring Consent for Apnea Testing in Brain Death DeterminationIvor Berkowitz & Jeremy R. Garrett Beyond the Apnea Test: An Argument to Broaden the Requirement for Consent to the Entire Brain Death EvaluationErin Paquette, Joel Frader, Seema Shah, Robert C. Tasker & Robert Truog The Case Against Solicitation of Consent for Apnea TestingDhristie B...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Tinslee Lewis Remains on Life Support as Her Family Awaits a Ruling in Their Legal Battle
Fox TV in Fort Worth offers a video update on the Tinslee Lewis case. Oral arguments before the Court of Appeal were over three months ago. We are still waiting for a decision. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Novel Approach Using Social Media to Solve Medical Ethical Dilemmas and Legal Risks in the Emergencies of COVID-19
by Jing Wan,Yuqiong Huang, Amaneh Abdel Hafez Aljaafreh, Dandan Dong, Yali Cong , Jun Lin, Hongxiang Chen   COVID-19 is an emerging infectious disease that is extremely contagious and can cause serious consequences and even death. Convalescent plasma, an unregistered therapy, from which the antibodies might suppress the virus, has been proven effective in the treatment of SARS, Ebola and H1N1, without severe adverse events (Chen et al.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Clinical Ethics Clinical Trials & Studies Decision making Featured Posts Health Care Informed Consent Research Ethics Social Media #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Why States Are on the Fence about a Patient ’s Right to Die
I joined several advocates and opponents of medical aid in dying for a new article out this morning in the ABA Journal. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Utilitarianism and the Lockdown
by Roger Crisp Utilitarianism is in the news. It was widely believed that the UK government’s so-called ‘herd immunity’ strategy, which involved sacrificing the important interests of a relative few for the sake of benefits for the many, was motivated by a commitment to utilitarianism. Now several commentators around the world have suggested that decisions to ease […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Roger Crisp Tags: Ethics Health Care Public Health International/ Global Health lockdown Pandemic Ethics Roger Crisp's Posts syndicated utilitarianism Source Type: blogs

Post-Covid Bioethics
Covid-19 is making bioethics more relevant than ever. The ethical dilemmas raised by the pandemic are urgent and heart-wrenching. Who should get a ventilator if we do not have enough? How can we protect the most vulnerable from discrimination in the face of difficult triage decisions? How do we weigh individual liberty against the public interest of keeping people confined? While such questions are not new for bioethicists, the need to answer them urgently, globally, and in very concrete settings, creates unprecedented circumstances. Is this an opportunity for bioethics to learn some important lessons? What should post-Cov...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Justice bioethics COVID-19 global community Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medicine as spectacle: Public expectations of physicians as seen through art and television By Rachel Martel, a 4th year medical student at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, and a former English major at Tufts University. She plans on pursuing a residency in Ob/Gyn.
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

Are Decisions to Withdraw Life Support Being Made too Soon?
Earlier this year, Medscape UK surveyed 1355 physicians on key ethical questions. One question was "Are Decisions to Withdraw Life Support Being Made too Soon?" One in ten respondents said yes. One quarter said it depends. Some specific comments inclu... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Beyond the Covid Crisis —A New Social Contract with Public Health
Covid-19 is teaching us the stern lesson that economic well-being and health justice are two sides of the same coin. To weather pandemics and restore the social contact that economic life demands, we need to sign a new social contract with public health. The post Beyond the Covid Crisis—A New Social Contract with Public Health appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health civic engagement COVID-19 democracy emergency planning Hastings Bioethics Forum Pandemic Planning syndicated Source Type: blogs

Trust and the Pandemic
One of the necessary requirements of a doctor-patient relationship is the establishment of trust in that relationship. A vulnerable patient presents to a physician who theoretically has the skill and knowledge necessary to help resolve the patient’s problem. Ultimately, the patient has to trust the information and treatment recommendations of his or her physician. Even … Continue reading "Trust and the Pandemic" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

We ’re All Vitalists Now
By Charles Foster It has been a terrible few months for moral philosophers – and for utilitarians in particular. Their relevance to public discourse has never been greater, but never have their analyses been so humiliatingly sidelined by policy makers across the world. The world’s governments are all, it seems, ruled by a rather crude […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Charles Foster Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Health Care Politics Public Health Science bioethics Biomedical Science Charles Foster's Posts Collective Responsibility Critical Care Current Affairs End of life decisions Euthanasia and Assisted Source Type: blogs

Limitations of Palliative Care – Truth about Dying
This report has many mo... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Why I Don ’t Support Age-Related Rationing During the Covid Pandemic
Some bioethicists support age-related rationing of ventilators during the Covid-19 pandemic as a way to save the most lives. But that goal might be better realized without strict age cutoffs. The post Why I Don’t Support Age-Related Rationing During the Covid Pandemic appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care aging COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum medical rationing syndicated Source Type: blogs

Fitting the Just War Theory to the Fifth Domain: Is Cyberwarfare Any More Ethical?
STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE FIRST-PLACE WINNER By Ray Tischio In light of completing my International Studies thesis on nation-state cyber conflict this semester, I have given a lot of thought to the ethical component of this subject throughout the last few months. Although ethics was not something my thesis particularly addressed, I often found […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Ethics Health Care Chynn Prize conflict cyber cyber warfare Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Fordham University Student Voices history Just War Theory justifiable war morality philosophy syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Transcript: Re-Opening the Nation: Privacy, Surveillance and Digital Tools for Contact Tracing
[00:00:09] Hello and welcome to Reopening the Nation Hastings Center, a conversation about the next steps forward in the coveted 19 pandemic. We’re so pleased to have with us today. Ryan, Kalo, Ed Felten and Mildred Solomon. We’re hoping for strong audience participation. So please do us questions by typing them into the Q&A box… Read more The post Transcript: Re-Opening the Nation: Privacy, Surveillance and Digital Tools for Contact Tracing appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark Cardwell Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

VSED – An Important Alternative to MAID
Medical aid in dying is available in only a handful of jurisdictions. In contrast, VSED is widely available. Moreover, even in those jurisdictions that have affirmatively legalized MAID, not everyone who wants the option is eligible. So, VSED remains an important option even in MAID jurisdictions. Unfortunately, MAID advocates often inaccurately characterize VSED. For example, take Ronald Deprez, one of the first individuals to use MAID in Maine. Hhis daughter reports that had he been unable to obtain MAID, her father "would have considered what’s known as VSED. . . . He would have starved himself to deat...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs