A Covid-19 Side Effect: Virulent Resurgence of Ageism
Of all the “isms,” ageism is arguably the hardest to address because old age neither a valued stage of life nor an identity that many claim. The coronavirus pandemic may have made that effort even harder. The post A Covid-19 Side Effect: Virulent Resurgence of Ageism appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care ageism aging COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum pandemic syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 Trilogy in 17 (Haiku)
by Hedy Wald   Civilization No longer as we knew it Rainfall hits dry ground   Stripped down to essence We treasure touch of cool breeze When hug cannot be   Pause, unmask to breathe Hope sustains as the tree bud Bursts forth in Springtime Hedy S. Wald, PhD is Clinical Professor of Family Medicine at […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying – Where Is It Legal?
Medical aid in dying is legal in only a handful of jurisdictions across the world. Typically, MAID refers to a physician writing a lethal prescription that a seriously ill patient may (or may not) later take on her own. MAID is legal in these jurisdict... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

There is No New Normal. Perseverance in the Age of COVID-19
by Craig Klugman,PhD, Angira Patel MD, MPH, Nanette Elster, JD, MPH, and Dalia Feltman, MD, MA The debate continues on when and how to open the country back up and allow communities to return to “normal”.  Consensus is lacking and there is significant variability across the country. The federal government rejected a CDC guideline for opening. Some states have come out with their own plans, and some states are just opening all the way through both governor orders and court decisions.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Supplemental Advance Directive For Dementia
More than ten organizations have developed and distributed tools or forms to complete dementia directives. Many include provisions to stop eating and drinking. This is known as SED by AD. The most recent organization to publish an AD for SED is the F... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Diversity and Solidarity in Response to Covid-19
Covid-19 imposes burdens in different—but very serious—ways on different individuals and groups. We see it in policies that address what to do in the face of shortages of scarce resources. We begin by challenging a common claim—that people with disabilities as a group will be harmed by triage policies that consider patients’ prospect of medical benefit. The post Diversity and Solidarity in Response to Covid-19 appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 disability diversity Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated triage protocols Source Type: blogs

Covid-19, Economics and Bioethics
Bioethics, in its essence, is multi-disciplinary. It involves medicine, philosophy, theology, political science, and supernumerary other scholarly fields. And, of course and, perhaps, unfortunately, economics. Bioethics is blessed, and plagued, by its confluence of academic influences, and operates within their inevitable, intersecting, conflicting, uncomfortable gray areas. The Covid-19 pandemic speaks to the bioethical implications that … Continue reading "Covid-19, Economics and Bioethics" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jerry Risser Tags: Health Care Politics Public Health bioethics COVID-19 Medical Economics public policy syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Compulsory treatment or vaccination versus quarantine
By Thomas Douglas, Jonathan Pugh and Lisa Forsberg Cross posted with the Journal of Medical Ethics Blog Governments worldwide have responded to the Covid-19 pandemic with sweeping constraints on freedom of movement, including various forms of isolation, quarantine, and ‘lockdown’. Governments have also introduced new legal instruments to guarantee the lawfulness of their measures. In […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Jonny Pugh's Posts Lisa Forsberg's Posts Pandemic Ethics syndicated Tom Douglas' Posts Source Type: blogs

Sick to Debt Now Available as Audio Book
I’m excited to announce that my book is now available through Audible, to accompany you on all those long commutes you are no longer making to your job every day. Sigh…  But seriously, I think the topic of this book is more relevant than ever, and hope that having another way to “read” Sick to […] The post Sick to Debt Now Available as Audio Book appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health care cost Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Why New Mothers With Covid-19 Should Not Be Separated From Their Newborns
The Covid-19 pandemic has been characterized by many unknowns, chief among them in the world of pediatric ethics is the question of separating mothers who are infected or suspected of being infected from their newborns after delivery to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission. Guidance on this issue is conflicting. The post Why New Mothers With Covid-19 Should Not Be Separated From Their Newborns appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Children and Families COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum newborns rooming in separation syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Role of Solidarity in Research in Global Health Emergencies
by Katharine Wright & Julian Sheather Pratt et al. highlight important ways in which solidarity between researchers and communities provides both an ethical underpinning, and an ethical goal, for community engagement in global health research. We suggest that for the same reasons, the aspects of solidarity identified in the target article are essential to an understanding of what constitutes ethical research during a global health emergency, such as the current COVID-19 outbreak. SOLIDARITY AS A BASIS FOR INTERVENTION IN GLOBAL HEALTH EMERGENCIES In its recent report on research in such emergencies, the Nuffield Counci...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Global Ethics Informed Consent Research Ethics solidarity Source Type: blogs

Right to Die – Recent Legal Developments
Our second biannual 2020 supplement of The Right to Die includes many new legal developments. It includes judicial cases, legislation, and news accounts of important legal proceedings that are not officially reported concerning end-of-life decision making. These include: MAID. A ruling from a Massachusetts court that a physician would not violate the state’s involuntary manslaughter statute either by providing information and advice about medical aid-in-dying or by referring patients to physicians willing to provide it where it is legal. MAID. A ruling from a New Jersey superio...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying by Telehealth
As with many other types of health care services, medical aid in dying has been increasingly offered through telehealth over the past several weeks. The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying issued a policy statement in March. Many Canadian provincial medical boards have issued similar guidance. While written before the COVID-19 pandemic, Konstantin Tretyakov has just published "Medical Aid in Dying by Telehealth" in Health Matrix. He explains that his article "explores the possibility of facilitating access to medical aid in dying via telehealth—a method of providing health care rem...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Why Health Care Workers Should Receive Priority Care for Covid-19
The Covid-19 pandemic has imposed tremendous risk on doctors, nurses, and other health care workers not seen in a century. It is time to reconsider prioritization of health care workers’ access to scare critical resources. Historically, for multiple reasons, health care workers have not been prioritized for access to medical care during a pandemic. However, given the unprecedented circumstances surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic, it is justifiable to prioritize health care workers when all else is equal between two patients. The post Why Health Care Workers Should Receive Priority Care for Covid-19 appeared first on T...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cherishing our Elderly and COVID Rationing
by Ann Mongoven, Ph.D., MPH As COVID-19 surges across the country, more hospitals face the agonizing question:  whom shall we try to save when we cannot save all?  The question is particularly acute for allocation of ventilators and continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), a support system for acute critical kidney failure. In the absence of federal guidelines, rationing policies are being developed by individual hospitals or regional collaborations. Many of these policies have been called into question by the U.S. Office of Civil Rights’ (OCR) statementthat age cannot be considered.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ann Mongoven Tags: Featured Posts #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear age-related rationing allocation COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly Patient Modesty) Volume 111
"Manning up" as a patient in a patient-doctor or patient-nursing staff relationship may end uplosing the very tool for improvement and change.  This was emphasized by Biker in hisComment in Volume 110: "to the extent men have manned up rather than... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

High Anxiety: Going Viral? By Howard Trachtman, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, NYU Grossman School of Medicine and Co-editor, LitMed Database.
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care Current Topics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Antibody Tests Could Offer A False Sense of Security
A lot of hope on reopening businesses and returning to work in the U.S. hinges on COVID-19 testing and the development of treatments and a vaccine. But as the country ramps up antibody testing – analyzing blood samples for signs someone has been exposed to or infected with the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 – physician […] The post Antibody Tests Could Offer A False Sense of Security appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Better Consent —and Not Just for When Time Is Short
by Jerry Menikoff, MD, JD In a world with far too much dissonance, sometimes things nonetheless manage to come together. Such is the case regarding the article by Dickert and colleagues in this issue, “Partnering with Patients to Bridge Gaps in Consent for Acute Care Research”, and the recent changes in the Common Rule relating to improving research consent. Dickert and colleagues’ work is a refreshing and very timely attempt at determining how we can improve informed consent for acute care clinical research trials.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Informed Consent Source Type: blogs

Being a Medical Student During the COVID-19 Pandemic
By Michael Bertenthal As a kid, I was a devoted soccer goalkeeper.  I lived for the opportunity to step in front of an oncoming shot to protect the net.  I loved the action of diving to make a save, getting my knees skinned and uniform muddied, and occasionally colliding with oncoming players. When I entered […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Sustaining Clinical Empathy During the Pandemic
As Covid-19 continues to spread throughout the United States, doctors, nurses, and oth-er clinicians are facing unmistakable tragedies. But something less perceptible is afoot. Empathy in medicine is under siege. The post Sustaining Clinical Empathy During the Pandemic appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care clinician burnout COVID-19 empathy Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Legal Challenge to Government ’s Lack of Guidance on DNR Orders
In 2014, Kate Masters' family won an important appellate judgment on behalf of her mother Janet Tracey, holding that UK physicians may not write DNR orders without first discussing them with the patient or family. Now, Ms. Masters wants to enforc... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Unblinded: Systematic Racism, Institutional Oppression, and Colorblindness
by Nneka O. Sederstrom, PhD, MPH, MA, FCCP The data are clear: African Americans are becoming infected with the novel coronavirus and dying at a higher rate than White Americans. The rationale is clear: African Americans have higher rates of comorbid conditions than White Americans. The reason is clear: over 400 years of systematic racism, institutional oppression, and continued colorblindness have lead to this outcome. I know that seems like a simplistic explanation for something that is so very complex but it highlights the fundamental flaws we are facing in our guidelines.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Public Health Social Justice #covid19 #diary colorblindness COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

Teaching Medical Ethics During the Pandemic
Despite the disruptive changes to my undergraduate medical ethics class this semester, my students have learned a lot about the paradox that the coronavirus presents: it is an unprecedented event, beyond the experience of nearly everyone alive today, and yet it puts on grim display the well-known problems of inequality that chronically plague the United States. Since week six of the semester, I have readjusted each unit on the syllabus to address some of the ethical issues that Covid-19 has brought to the fore, familiar challenges that have been stressed and distorted in astonishing ways by the pandemic. The post Teaching...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care college COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum medical ethics pandemic syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: Weapon, accident or an administration gone batty?
by Jonathan Moreno, Ph.D. and Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.  For a moment, let’s suppose that the novel coronavirus was produced by a lab in Wuhan as a biological weapon, as some in the Trump Administration have alleged. In that fictional scenario, we have nothing to fear from utterly inept Chinese military planners:  They’d have developed a malign microbe that strikes mainly at old and sick people, not the healthy, young people who fight wars and power economies. Smart medical warriors all know that there are already bugs in nature that don’t require any engineering that target the strong and youthful.&...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Media Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 hoax Source Type: blogs

Fordham University ’s Dr. Michael Baur Discusses Moral Fatigue During Coronavirus Pandemic with CBC’s Matt Galloway
Michael Baur, Ph.D., J.D., Associate Professor of Philosophy and Adjunct Professor of Law, Director of the Natural Law Colloquium, and Associate Director of the Center for Ethics Education at Fordham University recently spoke with Matt Galloway of CBC’s The Current on the topic of moral fatigue in everyday life during the coronavirus pandemic. Having emerged […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care bioethics coronavirus COVID-19 Fordham University Center for Ethics Education moral fatigue Moral Stress pandemic philosophy syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Contact-tracing apps and the future COVID-19 vaccination should be compulsory. Social, technological, and pharmacological immunisation
Written by Alberto Giubilini Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities – Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics University of Oxford     Main point: Lockdown measures to contain the spread of COVID-19 have so far been compulsory in most countries. In the same way, use of contact tracing apps should be compulsory once lockdown measures […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Alberto Giubilini Tags: Ethics Health Care Public Health Alberto Giubilini's Posts contact tracing app Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health Current Affairs lockdown Pandemic Ethics syndicated vaccination Source Type: blogs

Announcement: Online Short Courses Open. Philosophy, Psychiatry and Mental Health, and Neuroethics
Applications are open to join our two June short courses on the ethics and philosophy of neuroscience, psychiatry, and mental health which will be run online this year. For details and how to apply: Neuroethics, 15-19 June Philosophy, Psychiatry and M... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Announcements syndicated Source Type: blogs

International Shared Decision Making Conference 2021
The 2021 International Shared Decision Making Conference (ISDM) will be held from June 28-30, 2021 in Kolding, Denmark. The conference will be hosted by the Center for Shared Decision Making, Vejle/Lillebælt University of Southern Denmark in collaboration with the Region of Southern Denmark and the University of Southern Denmark. It was a pleasure to participate in ISDM 2017 in Lyon and ISDM 2019 in Quebec City. I am looking forward to ISDM 2021. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Who Has A Right to Know A Person is COVID Positive: Lessons from HIV
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. In a lawsuit this week, a judge in Cook County (IL) ruled against a suburban that wanted to force the county “to share the addresses of coronavirus patients”. The judge justified the ruling by explaining concerns about keeping privacy and preventing discrimination. The EMS system feels this information is necessary so that “first responders can take adequate precautions”. Hearing about this debate stirred memories of similar debates 35 years ago over whether the names and addresses of HIV positive patients should be publicized.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Cultural Decision making Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law HIV/AIDS Privacy Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Show Me Your Passport: Ethical Concerns About Covid-19 Antibody Testing as Key to Reopening Public Life
Around the world, governments are looking for safe ways to lift unprecedented restrictions on public activities to curb the spread of Covid-19. So-called immunity passports could be key to the effort to selectively ease restrictions for people presumed to be immune to the virus. But there are scientific and ethical questions to be worked out before they can be deployed. . The post Show Me Your Passport: Ethical Concerns About Covid-19 Antibody Testing as Key to Reopening Public Life appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Covid-19 antibody testing Hastings Bioethics Forum immunity passport reopening the economy syndicated Source Type: blogs

Forced Medical Feeding
By Roger Crisp At a recent New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar Prof. Noam Zohar of the Dept. of Philosophy, Bar Ilan University and a member of Israel’s National Bioethics Council, spoke on ‘Debating Forced Medical Feeding: A Critical Examination of Israeli Responses to Hunger Strikes’. He began by setting his argument in the context of recent […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Roger Crisp Tags: Clinical Ethics Health Care Politics bioethics Critical Care Current Affairs End of life decisions forced feeding hunger strikes Israel prison ethics Roger Crisp's Posts syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Following the Science Without Forgetting Values
Written by Stephen Rainey It is presently feared that ‘lockdown’ may be beginning to fray at the edges, as people tire of their restrictions. From the start of the emergency, discussion focussed upon the ability of the public to stay the course where restrictions were at stake. This neatly ignores the public’s being ahead of […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Stephen Rainey Tags: Health Care Justice Politics COVID-19 governance law policy political legitimacy public discourse responsibility syndicated transparency Uncategorized values Source Type: blogs

Bioethics and the Study of Health Care Economics
A recent Technology Review article by Peter Dizikes featured a review of the academic work of Dr. Amy Finkelstein, an MIT economics professor who arguably has changed the way we understand the economic impact of health insurance. Though not the primary focus of her work, her results have also led to a better understanding of … Continue reading "Bioethics and the Study of Health Care Economics" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Health Care Practice syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Jersey Denies Petition to Identify All Physicians Who Provide MAID
In late December 2019, real estate broker Abraham Sharaby petitioned the New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners to indicate whether a physician has participated in the Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act as part of the website profile that t... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 5, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethical Medicine Means Getting Political
Dilemmas that clinicians face in the coronavirus pandemic–who gets the ventilator, the 80-year-old grandmother or the 20-year-old student?–are the bread and butter of mainstream bioethics. In medical school, my classmates and I memorized the four principles (beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and autonomy), which we were told would help us make hard clinical decisions in ethically ambiguous terrain. But Covid-19 shows that medical ethics means much more than what generally falls under bioethics. Medical ethics is deeply political, and to act ethically in medicine means engaging the larger context in which it...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics climate change COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum racism social determinants syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 and the Vulnerable
April 2020 is over and not a moment too soon.  As we enter May, it is reported that over 60,000 people in America have died of COVID-19.  There is a measure of relief that some of the most dire predictions of ICU hospitalizations and deaths have not materialized. As many have suggested, a good dose … Continue reading "COVID-19 and the Vulnerable" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Washington v. Glucksberg: Has the Supreme Court Overruled its Decision on Medical Aid in Dying?
Has the U.S. Supreme Court overruled Washington v. Glucksberg, its 1997 decision on Medical Aid in Dying? Ronald Turner has the answer in the new issue of the Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy. Turner explains, "In Washington v. Glucksberg, the Court held that an asserted right to physician-assisted suicide is not a fundamental liberty interest protected by the clause because it is not a right deeply rooted in this nation's history and tradition." "More recently, in Obergefell v. Hodges, the Court held that state laws prohibiting same-sex marriage violated the Due Process Clause. In so h...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Appellate Court Affirms Criminal Conviction for Violating MAID Law
In late April 2020, the Criminal Appeal and Review Chamber of the Geneva Court of Justice issued a judgment affirming the October 2019 sentencing of physician Pierre Beck for violating the Swiss law on medical aid in dying. In 2017, Beck assisted an o... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs