New Jersey Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act.Survives Constitutional Attack
The New Jersey Superior Court has rejected a constitutional attack on the 2019 Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act. (Star Ledger) Just as constitutional attacks on the California End of Life Options Act have failed, so have attacks on the ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 4, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Do New York State ’s Ventilator Allocation Guidelines Place Chronic Ventilator Users at Risk? Clarification Needed
There is a lack of clarity about the New York State Task Force guidelines on ventilator allocation. I believe disability rights concerns regarding the recommendations on chronic ventilator users are well-founded. This lack of clarity may cost lives. The post Do New York State’s Ventilator Allocation Guidelines Place Chronic Ventilator Users at Risk? Clarification Needed appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Chronic Conditions and End of Life Care disability Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care New York State Task Force on Life and the Law syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs

Saving Grace by Mandy O ’Hara
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Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care A Different Take syndicated Source Type: blogs

The COVID-19 Pandemic: Critical Care Allocated in Extremis
Dr. Goold’s post is a commentary on Laurence McCullough’s post, “In Response to COVID-19 Pandemic Physicians Already Know What to Do” by Susan Dorr Goold, MD, MHSA, MA Professor McCullough, a distinguished scholar in bioethics and the history of bioethics, wisely exhorts us to learn from past experience as we confront the COVID-19 pandemic. We should not rush to develop brand new criteria for allocating scarce resources in intensive care units (ICUs), says McCullough, but should instead rely on what we have learned over many years.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Dorr Goold Tags: Decision making Featured Posts professional ethics Public Health #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 rationing Rationing/ Resource Allocation Source Type: blogs

In Response to COVID-19 Pandemic Physicians Already Know What to Do
by Laurence B. McCullough, Ph.D. The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted multiple responses from bioethicists and bioethics organizations.  One prominent response has come from The Hastings Center, “Ethical Framework for Health Care Institutions and Guidelines for Institutional Ethics Services Responding to the Novel Coronavirus Pandemic”: An ethically sound framework for health care during public health emergencies must balance the patient-centered duty of care—the focus of clinical ethics under normal conditions—with public-focused duties to promote equality of persons and equity in distribution o...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Laurence McCullough Tags: Decision making Featured Posts professional ethics Public Health #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Expert: NC better positioned than other states to respond to pandemic (WRAL)
The slow growth in coronavirus cases in North Carolina relative to New York and some other states puts North Carolina in better position to respond to the pandemic, according to a Duke University professor. Economist Mark McClellan, the director of the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy, was U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner during the […] The post Expert: NC better positioned than other states to respond to pandemic (WRAL) appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

What Ethical Framework Can Justify the Allocation of Ventilators During the COVID-19 Pandemic?
Join this webinar at 2 PM ET on April 9, 2020: "What Ethical Framework Can Justify the Allocation of Ventilators During the COVID-19 Pandemic?" The speaker is my former Georgetown classmate Henry Silverman, MD, MA at the University of Maryland Baltimore. During the past few weeks, New York City has become an epicenter of the recent COVID-19 pandemic. As a result, hospitals are increasingly running short of Personal Protective Devices (PPEs) and there is a concern that there will not be enough ventilators. In the NY Times on 4/2, there was this headline: “New York could deplete its ventilator stockpile ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Webinar on Impact of Coronavirus on Advance Care Planning
Join this webinar at 2:00 PM ET on Friday, April 3, 2020. Continuing the conversation (listen to Part 1 here), this session will demonstrate using virtual discussions during the current Coronavirus crisis.  This webinar will include information on creating video messages with residents, securely storing them and accessing them and other advance care planning documents via MyDirectives.com and the ADVault Exchange global repository, both part of Texas-based ADVault, Inc.   With consumer users in over 50 countries, MyDirectives is the world’s first all-digital advance care planning platform with ent...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Can this Dementia Patient Revoke Her Advance Directive?
This scene in a recent TV drama depicts the challenging situation when what the patient says ("give me life-sustaining treatment") now contradicts the instructions in her advance directive ("do NOT give me life-sustaining treatment"). In past and fort... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 3, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Your Co-Morbidity Is My Normative Reality: Transgender in the Early Era of SARS-COV-2
by Em Rabelais, PhD, MBE, MS, MA, RN In the very best of times, and just like cisgender people, non-binary and transgender folx find medicine a difficult landscape to navigate (for definitions, see here). Healthcare while trans: It’s not fun. Trans existence isn’t normal according to medicine and the other health professions. Our bodies are medicalized. Our knowledge of our own bodies is deemed irrelevant, whether or not we’re seeking gender care. Genders that are not cisgender are considered morbidities.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Em Rabelais Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Social Justice #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Disability ethics trans health Source Type: blogs

Confronting Disability Discrimination During the Pandemic
As hospitals and public health authorities devise triage protocols to allocate scarce critical-care resources during the Covid-19 pandemic, people with disabilities are expressing alarm that these protocols devalue them and exacerbate long-entrenched ableism in health care. Lawsuits alleging disability discrimination in have been filed in Washington and Alabama. The U.S. Office for Civil Rights is investigating disability discrimination complaints in triage protocols. The challenge is to develop protocols that will minimize discrimination in the health care system. The post Confronting Disability Discrimination During the...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care ableism Chronic Conditions and End of Life Care COVID-19 crisis planning disability lawsuits syndicated Source Type: blogs

Preventing the Spread of Mental Symptoms Can Also Help Contain COVID-19
by Bandy X. Lee, MD, MDiv A novel coronavirus strain has rapidly spread around the world into a pandemic. Country responses over the past several weeks show that information dissemination is crucial for containing the disease. Psychological readiness to accept intelligence reports, public health advice, and the reality of the disease itself therefore is critical to a nation’s concerted behavioral change. But what happens when that psychological readiness itself is lost? Through no fault of those receiving misinformation, falsehoods can spread rapidly through our interconnected, social me...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bandy Lee Tags: Featured Posts Media Psychiatric Ethics Public Health #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Video Interview: What Caused the Coronavirus Pandemic – with Peter Singer
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Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 2, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics syndicated Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

The Principle of Proportionality: An Ethical Approach to Resource Allocation During the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Kate Jackson-Meyer, Ph.D. Policy makers, hospitals, and health care professionals are facing, or are likely to face, excruciating ethical decisions about resource allocation and risk calculation due to the COVID-19 pandemic and medical supply shortages.  Emphasizing the principle of proportionality in resource allocation can help to correct for the shortcomings and limits of the maximizing approach, which is the dominant approach being put forward. A limited number of life-saving ventilators means that decisions will have to be made about who receives ventilators and who does not. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Philosophy & Ethics Public Health #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 crisis standards of care Source Type: blogs

Voluntariness in research consent in a pandemic
by Thibaud Haaser, MD, PhD The current coronavirus pandemic challenges health care systems, raises ethical questions about health policies, and makes some countries fear or even face dilemmas over the allocation of scarce resources. One of these challenges is the responsiveness and adaptation of research to a dynamic context. Vaccine or treatment studies are emerging as priorities as they have a crucial role in the healthcare response. Of course these processes require patient enrollment in order to study the safety and efficacy of preventive or curative strategies.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thibaud Haaser Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Featured Posts Informed Consent Public Health Research Ethics #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Disabusing the Disability Critique of the New York State Task Force Report on Ventilator Allocation
I am a member of the New York State Task Force on Life and the Law and helped write its 2015 guidelines on the allocation of ventilators during a public health emergency. The position outlined by the Task Force report has been a point of confusion in the media. I don't believe that the Task Force recommendations discriminate against people with disabilities. The post Disabusing the Disability Critique of the New York State Task Force Report on Ventilator Allocation appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care disability Discrimination Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care New York Task Force on Life and the Law syndicated ventilator allocation Source Type: blogs

Queensland Parliament Health Committee Report Recommends Voluntary Assisted Dying
The Queensland Parliament Health Committee has just released a 200-page report supporting voluntary assisted dying.   The report's findings and recommendations are based on more than 40 hearings, more than 4500 submissions, and more than 500... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 1, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What is Your Gender?  A Friendly Guide to the Public Debate
What is your gender? A friendly guide to the public debate Brian D. Earp   Note: This is a lightly edited transcript of an informal lecture based on coursework submitted as part of my Ph.D. It was recorded on Whidbey Island, Washington, and published online on January 15th, 2020. A link to the video is here: […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Brian D. Earp Tags: Health Care Politics bioethics Brian D. Earp's Posts Current Affairs Epistemic Ethics feminism gender identity medical ethics medicine Reflections respect sex syndicated Transgender Source Type: blogs

Clinical Ethics in Catastrophic Situations: Mapping a Standard of Care — Journal of Clinical Ethics Special Publication
The Journal of Clinical Ethics has made a special publication open access - "Clinical Ethics in Catastrophic Situations: Mapping a Standard of Care." Bedside Ethics and Health System Catastrophe: Imagine If You Will . . .Jeffrey T. Berger, Guest Editor A Possible Application of Care-Based Ethics to People with Disabilities during a PandemicEdmund G. HoweFamily Participation in the Care of Patients in Public Health DisastersTia PowellSufficiency of Care in Disasters: Ventilation, Ventilator Triage, and the Misconception of Guideline-Driven TreatmentGriffin TrotterPandemic Preparedness Planning: Will Provisions for...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

US government ’s WWII mobilization on penicillin is a road map to fighting the coronavirus
On March 14, 1942, an American soldier with bacteria coursing through his bloodstream was treated with penicillin, a new wonder drug that saved his life. That single treatment exhausted half the nation’s supply of the drug. Two years later, as U.S. troops prepared to launch the D-Day invasion, America had more than 2 million doses of the drugready […] The post US government’s WWII mobilization on penicillin is a road map to fighting the coronavirus appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Ethics of COVID-19: Some Initial Reflections (webinar)
Join the next Loyola Bioethics Live webinar on Wednesday, April 1, 2020 @ 1:30 pm central - "The Ethics of COVID-19: Some Initial Reflections." Panelists: Thomas Cunningham, MS, MA, PhD, is the Director of Bioethics for Kaiser Permanente West Los Ange... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics: An Account of Attitudinal Duties Towards Injustice
This essay received an honourable mention in the Graduate Category Written by University of Oxford Student, Brian Wong Injustices are ubiquitous around us. From authoritarian regimes’ crackdown on human rights, to exploitative trafficking of illegal migrants, to human-induced destruction of rainforests upon which indigenous groups depend – injustices are negative states of affairs violating moral […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Justice Duties injustice Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Getting Ready to Confront the Unthinkable
by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D. Rationing  has always been present in the American health care system.  Some poor individuals have not had access to certain treatments due to a lack of health insurance or hospitals not willing to accept them if they cannot pay.  And those in the transplant field have had to contend for decades with a shortage of organs forcing organized rationing in which many more die than benefit from access to a life-saving liver, heart or lung.  Emergency medicine personnel in big hospitals drill frequently on how to triage after a terrorist attack, a huge chemical plant explosion, an earth...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 31, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Arthur Caplan Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Public Health #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 rationing Rationing/ Resource Allocation Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 Triage and Disability: What NOT To Do
by Joseph Stramondo, PhD Bioethicists and physicians scrambling to develop triage protocols for the COVID-19 crisis might have been surprised that counsel from Self Advocates in Leadership (SAIL), Disability Rights Washington (DRW), and The Arc of the United States (The Arc) filed a complaint recently with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Office for Civil Rights (OCR) over their concerns regarding disability discrimination in some of these protocols. Perhaps it is easy to dismiss such concerns as mere naivete that does not recognize the inevitability of the hard choices that are coming down the p...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Joseph Stramondo Tags: Featured Posts Justice Public Health #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 disabilities Disability ethics Source Type: blogs

Crowdfunding for Covid-Related Needs: Unfair and Inadequate
One-third of all new GoFundMe campaigns in the United States are for COVID-19-related needs. This shows where we have failed as a society. It is a makeshift response to institutional failures and not a fair or sustainable solution to crises. The post Crowdfunding for Covid-Related Needs: Unfair and Inadequate appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 crowdfunding GoFundMe Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care Pandemic Planning syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Coronavirus: Signs of Hope?
Written by Neil Levy These are scary times. The death toll from Covid-19 raises hour by hour and in most countries the rate of new infections continues to grow. While most of us know that if we contract the virus the disease will likely be mild for us, we have friends and family who are […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Levy Tags: Health Care Neil Levy's Posts syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Notarizing Advance Directives in a Pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has spurred advance care planning. But there is a big obstacle for those individuals who are already patients in healthcare institutions like hospitals and long-term care. There are no authorized witnesses or notaries available,... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Series: Trailer for Interviews on Ethical Questions Raised by the Corona Crisis
(Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Ethics Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health interviews Katrien Devolder Interview medical ethics Pandemic Ethics syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics: What, if Anything, is Wrong About Algorithmic Administration?
This essay received an honourable mention in the undergraduate category. Written by University of Oxford student, Angelo Ryu.   Introduction  The scope of modern administration is vast. We expect the state to perform an ever-increasing number of tasks, including the provision of services and the regulation of economic activity. This requires the state to make […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 30, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Technology administration algorithms law Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics society syndicated Source Type: blogs

More UK Legislation to Keep Treatment Conflicts from Court
Last month, I blogged about Charlie's Law legislation, which would mandate mediation before an NHS Trust may take a clinician-parent treatment conflict (like Alfie Evans and Charlie Gard) to the High Court. This month, a different MP (Bambos Charalambous) introduced a separate bill, Children (Access to Treatment). Like Charlie's Law, this bill aims to avoid "expensive and intensive court proceedings." It aims to accomplish that by: 1. Requiring access to mediation services in hospitals2. Providing access to clinical ethics committees3. Providing swift second medical opinions4. Providing access to legal ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 29, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly Patient Modesty) Volume 110
This graphic reminds us and summarizes all of the concerns repeatedly described with detail on this blog thread.  It comes from Google Images and I don't recall displaying it on a previous Volume of our topic.  I am sure there are additi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 Patient Decision Aid
The Colorado Program for Patient Centered Decisions has released a patient decision aid for patients to make choices about whether they would want mechanical ventilation. This one-page document is not an advance directive. Rather, it just asks about p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics: If Doctors Could Administer a Treatment That Would Move a Patient From a Vegetative State to a Minimally Conscious One, Should They Do So?
This essay was the runner up in the graduate category of the 6th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics. Written by University of Oxford student Matthew Minehan. INTRODUCTION Sally is a healthy young woman who suffers catastrophic brain trauma. Over many months, her doctors subject her to functional Magnetic Resonance Imagining (fMRI) scans and […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 28, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Neuroethics medical ethics Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Final Exit Network – New Website
The Final Exit Network is not as well known as other end-of-life advocacy organizations like Compassion & Choices. But its newly redesigned website may help clarify its mission and activities. FEN has a different mission from C&C and Death wit... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Using Implementation Science to Enact Specific Ethical Norms: The Case of Code Status Policy
This editorial presented by the American Journal of Bioethics. You can see the April 2020 issue by clicking here. by Emily Shearer & David Magnus In their article, “The ‘Ought-Is Problem:’ An Implementation Science Framework for Translating Ethical Norms into Practice,” Sisk et al. correctly draw a distinction between aspirational norms (“broad claims that are easily agreed upon”–e.g. “Everyone should have their goals of care met at the end of life”)–and specific norms (claims that provide “direct guidance” about specific actions that should e...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB End of Life Care Ethics Featured Posts EHR Ethics committees Source Type: blogs

Like Autism, Representation Falls on a Spectrum
Presented in conjunction with the American Journal of Bioethics. You can see the April 2020 issue by clicking here. by Nanette Elster & Kayhan Parsi We live in a representative democracy. We presumably have the franchise to elect who will represent our interests. Moreover, we live in a society with a range of organizations that advocate for certain causes and represent the interests of a variety of stakeholders. The autism “community” is no different. Yet, no monolithic set of interests represents all the members of the autism community.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts autism Patient Advocacy patient advocacy organizations Source Type: blogs

Meaningful Fissures: The Value of Divergent Agendas in Patient Advocacy
Presented courtesy of the American Journal of Bioethics. You can see the April 2020 issue by clicking here.  by Jordan P. Richardson & Richard R. Sharp Patient advocacy organizations emerged in the 1950s to collectivize patient power and promote patient’s shared interests and rights. Since that time, patient advocacy organizations have grown in number and influence, filling an assortment of roles that include increasing public awareness, providing support to patients and families, building community, and advocating for research. It is their role in political activism that McCoy et al.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Patient Advocacy patient advocacy organizations Source Type: blogs

We Need International Medical Graduates to Help Fight Covid-19. Immigration Policies Keep Them Away
As the U.S. health care system faces the strain of responding to the coronavirus pandemic, critical services are being provided by international medical graduates, who, in the years and months leading up to this crisis, have found their capacity to contribute limited by increasingly restrictive immigration policies. International medical graduates, physicians trained in other countries,… Read more The post We Need International Medical Graduates to Help Fight Covid-19. Immigration Policies Keep Them Away appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care immigration policy rural health care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Benefits of the Pandemic – Advance Directives, Wills, Shelter Pets
While the COVID-19 pandemic is terrible for the economy and for the 5% of infected individuals who require critical care, news sources are reporting that the pandemic has benefits too. First, Americans typically do not plan for death, because they do ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs