Baby Born Three Months After Mother ’ s Death
In June 2019, doctors determined that 27-year-old Eva Votava was dead on neurologic criteria. But, because she was 16-weeks pregnant, they maintained her body on organ support. Three months later, in mid-August, when Eva was 34 weeks pregnant, clinic... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 28, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Most Expensive Medicare Patients Aren ’t Who You Think
Over half of Medicare spending is concentrated in 10% of patients. With Medicare expenditures rising at an unsustainable clip, reigning in the costs of those patients is key to controlling healthcare spending. So who are those patients and what expenses are … Continue reading → The post The Most Expensive Medicare Patients Aren’t Who You Think appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

NJ Appellate Court Overturns Suspension of Aid-in-Dying Law
This morning, a New Jersey appellate court overturned a superior court’s temporary restraining order that had suspended the state’s new medical aid-in-dying law.  The court’s ruling stated: “Having reviewed the record against the applicable law, we conclude the court abused its discretion in awarding preliminary injunctive relief...Accordingly, we dissolve the restraints issued pursuant to the August 14, 2019 order.” The appellate court ruling reinstated the law, which originally took effect on Aug. 1. Now, terminally ill state residents will be able to use it to peacefully end their suff...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Making of a Disaster: Anti-Vax Policy, Immigration, and U.S. Concentration Camps
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. In the 2019 BBC/HBO fictional near-future mini-series Years and Years, people deemed by a totalitarian U.K. government as undesirable—including immigrants and political dissidents—are placed into concentration camps. As Vivienne Rook, populist and fascist Prime Minister, says in response to overcrowding in the camps, “They simply let nature take its course. The camps were crowded, pestilent, and rife with disease. On the one hand that was regrettable. On the other hand, fitting. Because a natural selection process took place, and the population of the camps controlled itself.&helli...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Justice Pediatrics Public Health Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty):Volume 104
What emotional reaction to the behavior of the medical profession in the examination and treatment of male patients is the basis for what is being discussed here?  Is it fear? Is it not fear itself of exposure but the discrimination when consideri... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Minnesota Mini Bioethics Academy
On three Wednesday nights in September, check out the University of Minnesota Mini Bioethics Academy. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Legal Issues at End of Life – VSED
On Sunday, September 8, 2019, from 1 to 3, the Hemlock Society of San Diego presents a panel of experts who will speak on the legal issues involved when people want to take their own lives voluntarily stopping eating and drinking (VSED) and by whatever... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Overriding Advance Directives: A 20 ‐Year Legal and Ethical Overview
This article surveys a twenty‐year period extending back to 1997 when ethicists began to question the legitimacy of overriding advance directives despite clinicians believing they had compelling reasons to do so. A legal and ethical analysis of advance directive overrides is provided as no court to date has awarded damages to plaintiffs who alleged their loved one suffered “wrongful life” following a successful life‐prolonging intervention.  A hypothetical scenario is especially discussed wherein a patient's DNR status is overridden because her cardiac arrest was caused by error whose effects might ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Public Charge Rule is a Eugenic Policy
Last week, the Department of Homeland Security  announced the final public charge rule, which revises the interpretation of “public charge” in the Immigration and Nationality Act. Under the Final Rule, DHS may find applicants ineligible for a visa for admission to the U.S. or a green card granting legal permanent resident status if it determines… Read more The post The Public Charge Rule is a Eugenic Policy appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health Children and Families Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care public charge rule syndicated Trump administration Undocumented Patients Source Type: blogs

Amici Urge Supreme Court of Texas to Review Medical Futility Law (Kelly v. Houston Methodist)
Four amici have submitted a brief urging the Supreme Court of Texas to review the constitutionality of the Texas Advance Directives Act.  The amici urge the court to resolve a conflict across Texas jurisdictions on the validity of the public inte... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Lying on CVs is More Common Than You Might Think
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Have you ever lied on your curriculum vitae? Maybe you fudged a job title to sound more impressive (e.g, “research associate” rather than “intern”)? Or moved a date to cover a gap in your work history? Perhaps you are among those who completely made up a position or even a degree. From exaggerationsto adjustments to all out fabrication, it seems that Americans make up their work history far more often than we think. In a 2017 study of employers and hiring, 85% of the responding companiesreported having received applications with faked claims of experience, degrees, and accomp...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Ethics Featured Posts professional ethics CV lying Source Type: blogs

Angry Your Doctor Won ’t Tell You What That Test Costs? You Should Be!
Steve B. wasn’t going to be fooled twice. He’d recently seen an ear, nose, and throat specialist for a “tickle in the throat” that wouldn’t go away. He’d forked over a co-pay at check-in, but then the doctor said he … Continue reading → The post Angry Your Doctor Won’t Tell You What That Test Costs? You Should Be! appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What Happens As We Die?
This New Zealand newspaper has a nice article summarizing what happens as we die.  As with birth, dying is a process. How does it unfold? Can you prepare for it? And why should you keep talking to a dying person even if they don't talk back? (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Veil of Ignorance and Unrestricted Abortion
As a Christian, it seems to me that the most logically consistent application of justice is based upon the belief that all human beings bear the image of God, the imago Dei, and as bearers of the image, have equal human dignity, deserving of equal and just treatment by others, both morally and legally, regardless … Continue reading "Veil of Ignorance and Unrestricted Abortion" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care abortion bioethics Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Conscientious objection, professional discretionary space, and good medicine
By Doug McConnell   Some argue that good medicine depends on physicians having a wide discretionary space in which they can act on their consciences (Sulmasy, 2017). Interestingly, those who are against conscientious objection in medicine make the exact opposite claim – giving physicians the freedom to act on their consciences will undermine good medicine. […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Doug McConnell Tags: Health Care professional ethics conscientious objection discretionary space Doug McConnell's Posts syndicated tolerance Source Type: blogs

Free Markets – Madness or Miraculous?
Recently, I got an incredibly nice email from a complete stranger. It began like this: “I am an Economics teacher in England and have just finished reading your wonderful book ‘Free Market Madness’. When you write a book that only … Continue reading → The post Free Markets – Madness or Miraculous? appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Glassman v. Gerwal – TRO against New Jersey Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act
Joseph Glassman is a practicing Orthodox Jewish physician. Earlier this month, he sued the Attorney General of New Jersey to enjoin the New Jersey Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act, which became effective on August 1, 2019. Glassman... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Expanding End-of-Life Options in Minnesota
This Saturday, August 24, 2019, go to the Highland Park Library Community Room at 10:30 AM (1974 Ford Pkwy, Saint Paul, MN 55116) for "Expanding End-of-Life Options in Minnesota." This presentation will review the proposed Minnesota End-of-Life Option... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Supplemental Briefing to Ninth Circuit in Challenge to the Uniform Determination of Death Act
While already briefed and argued, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit asked for additional briefing in Fonseca v Smith. This case challenges the constitutionality of the California Uniform Determination of Death Act. In early August 2019, ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Hospice Expert Shares Her Death Online
Virginia Public Radio does a nice job describing how Kathy Brandt used social media to share her dying from ovarian cancer. The compelling story has also been nicely covered by Kaiser Health News and others. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven But Nobody Wants to Die – Bioethics and the Transformation of Health Care in America
Amy Gutmann and Jonathan Moreno have just published Everybody Wants to Go to Heaven But Nobody Wants to Die - Bioethics and the Transformation of Health Care in America. Gutmann and Moreno explore an unprecedented revolution in health care and explain the problem with America’s wanting everything that medical science has to offer without debating its merits and its limits. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What ’ s the right way for scientists to edit human genes? 5 essential reads
Ethical frameworks, rules, laws: all try to have their say. Tati9/Shutterstock.comSince scientists first figured out how to edit genes with precision using a technology called CRISPR, they’ve been grappling with when and how to do it ethically. Is it reasonable to edit human genes with CRISPR? What about human genes in reproductive cells that pass the edits on to future generations? The International Commission on the Clinical Use of Human Germline Genome Editing convened on Aug. 13 to hash out guidelines about editing human embryos. The goal is to provide a framework that researchers around the globe can consult to...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: The Conversation Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

POLST Forms Should Address Artificial Nutrition & Hydration
The National POLST Paradigm has published its position of keeping artificial nutrition on POLST forms in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. At the May 2019 meeting of the National POLST Paradigm Plenary Assembly, leaders from participatin... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medicaid: It ’s an Antipoverty Program, Stupid!
The first time Bill Clinton ran for president, his campaign chair was determined to keep the famously verbose candidate focused on one topic. So he coined a phrase:  “It’s the economy, stupid!” That phrase comes to mind when I think … Continue reading → The post Medicaid: It’s an Antipoverty Program, Stupid! appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Health & Well-being Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Another Brain Death Conflict with an Orthodox Jewish Family in Ontario
Idan Azrad suffered a traumatic head injury when he was struck while riding his bike near Ottawa. The 27-year-old was rushed to the Ottawa Hospital where he was later determined dead by neurologic criteria. (CTV) The family rejects the diagnosis a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

When the Cost of Health Care Makes it Too Expensive to Live
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. Last week there were two news stories about three individuals who died because they could not afford health care. The first is the story of Josh Wilkerson, age 27 who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Wilkerson could no longer afford his normal brand of insulin after aging out of his step-fathers’ private health insurance. Wilkerson’s salary of $16.50 an hour was not enough to cover the $1,200 price tag and with plans to save for a future wedding, Wilkerson switched to an over-the-counter brand of human insulin that is about $25 at Walmart.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics Public Health Social Justice Source Type: blogs

The Poetry of Dianne Silvestri, MD
Dianne Silvestri, MD, a retired academic physician, is author of the chapbook Necessary Sentiments. Her poems have appeared in Barrow Street, Naugatuck River Review, Poetry South, The Worcester Review, The Healing Muse, New Limestone Review, Zingara Poetry Review, The Main Street Rag, American Journal of Nursing, JAMA Oncology, and elsewhere. She is Copy-Editor of the […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care medical education narrative medicine Patient's Perspective syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Uncovered: In America, Insurance Doesn ’t Guarantee Access and Coverage Doesn’t Mean You’re Covered
Something like one in seven people living in the US have no healthcare insurance. In fact, the number of uninsured people has grown by 7 million since Trump has become president. (Make America Uninsured Again?) These numbers are atrocious. Embarrassing. Shameful, actually, … Continue reading → The post Uncovered: In America, Insurance Doesn’t Guarantee Access and Coverage Doesn’t Mean You’re Covered appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Health & Well-being health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Precious Baby Project
Angela Forker aims to spread hope and raise awareness for babies with special needs as she takes stunning and/or fun photos of babies with various medical needs. She wants to show the world that every baby is precious. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Climate Change & Bioethics: Do We Have a Duty to Not Procreate?
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Recently I read The Uninhabitable Earth by writer David Wallace-Wells, an exploration of the climatic and environmental challenges facing humanity and the entire planet. The message is grim—we are in big trouble regarding the long-term sustainability of complex life on Earth. The author is reluctantly optimistic that we can limit the damage we have created through massive geoengineering and socioeconomic change, but other critics are not so sure since the costs are overwhelming and the politic will is nearly nonexistent.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Decision making Environmental Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Reproductive Ethics Source Type: blogs

End of Medical Futility Laws in Texas, Virginia, and California
A bill recently introduced in the U.S. Senate would preempt medical futility laws in Texas, Virginia, and California. State laws in those jurisdictions currently permit clinicians to stop life-sustaining treatment even when desired by the patient or th... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - August 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs