The Moral Choices on CRISPR Babies
This post is presented in collaboration with the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read the entire issue by clicking here. by Sheldon Krimsky In late November 2018, Chinese scientist Dr. He Jiankui announced at the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong that he had used CRISPR/Cas 9 gene editing on two female embryos that were brought to term through an in vitro fertilization (IVF) pregnancy. The world scientific community was ill-prepared for the announcement since the moral issues surrounding the editing of human embryos were under discussion but hardly resolved.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Genetics Reproductive Ethics gene editing Source Type: blogs

Screening that benefits the screener
I teach it course on human diseases for students in a public health program. One of the things that we talk about is asymptomatic disease. If a disease has no symptoms the only way that we can detect it is by screening. For screening to be beneficial it needs to be able to detect asymptomatic … Continue reading "Screening that benefits the screener" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 2, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology Health Care Practice syndicated Source Type: blogs

Concerning the Basic Idea that the Wish to End Suffering Legitimates Physician Aid in Dying for Psychiatric Patients
by Suzanne van de Vathorst In 2018, 6126 cases of physician aid in dying (PAD) (4.4% of all deaths) were reported in the Netherlands. Of these 6126 cases, 67 involved patients with a psychiatric disease. Psychiatrists reported 34 of these, general practitioners (part of the Netherlands’ extensive system of family physicians) reported 20. The Netherlands has universal health care insurance, and equitable access to good quality health care, including psychiatric care. The Dutch generally trust their doctors and assume they are doing their job with our best interest in mind.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 2, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB End of Life Care Featured Posts Justice Psychiatric Ethics PAD Source Type: blogs

Death with Dignity: The Evolving Legal Status of Medical Aid in Dying
Here is the flyer for a talk that I am doing on Tuesday: "Death with Dignity: The Evolving Legal Status of Medical Aid in Dying." Objectives: Review the history, status, and prevalence of medical aid in dying in the United States. Identify two reaso... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 2, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Clinical Ethicist ’s Reflections on The Farewell
“Based on an Actual Lie”—thus begins The Farewell, a film that follows 30-year-old Billi from her New York City home to Changchun, China, where she and her family visit her dying grandmother Nai-Nai.  Billi’s family arrives in Changchun under the guise of a wedding celebration for Nai-Nai’s grandson, but they have really come together to all be with Nai-Nai before she dies of stage IV lunch cancer. The ‘actual lie’ on which the story is based concerns the withholding of grim health information from the family’s matriarch; but this very substantial lie coexists with myria...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: End of Life Care Health Care autonomy Bioethics in the Media patient autonomy Senior Care social norms syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid-in-Dying is an Ethical and Important End-of-Life Care Option
This post is presented in collaboration with the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read the entire issue by clicking here. by Dan Diaz My wife, Brittany Maynard, died on November 1, 2014, of a brain tumor, but she used medical aid-in-dying to insure a peaceful death and end the unbearable suffering when no other option would provide relief. After Brittany was diagnosed in January 2014, she endured an eight-hour brain surgery and we researched every treatment option that offered any hope of extending her life.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB End of Life Care Featured Posts Brittany Maynard Source Type: blogs

Cross Post: Is Mandatory Vaccination the Best Way to Tackle Falling Rates of Childhood Immunisation?
This article was originally published on the Oxford Martin School website. Following the publication of figures showing UK childhood vaccination rates have fallen for the fifth year in a row, researchers from the Oxford Martin Programme on Collective Responsibility for Infectious Disease discuss possible responses. Alberto Giubilini: Yes, “we […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Alberto Giubilini's Posts children choice Cross Post mandatory vaccination medical ethics syndicated vaccinations Source Type: blogs

Different answers to “Why?”
Sometimes when we ask “Why” we are really asking the mechanical or causation question: “How did something come to be?” In a billiards game, one might ask: “Why did the 8 ball go into the side pocket?” A valid answer might be: “It was struck by the 3 ball.” A reasonable follow-up question might be: … Continue reading "Different answers to “Why?”" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care bioethics Ethical Method / Grounding Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Calls to Expand New Jersey Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act
It has been only a few months since New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed the Medical Aid in Dying for the Terminally Ill Act. Yet, already, the editorial board of the New Jersey Law Journal is calling on the state legislature to expand the eligibilit... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Range of Bioethics: From Generalist to Hyperspecialist
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. I recently read Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World written by investigative journalist David Epstein. The crux of the book is that people with more generalized experiences in a variety of different fields tend to do be more successful in their chosen work. The further we range, the better we are. This idea, that broad learning is beneficial is the basis of the liberal arts model—broad exposure to a wide variety of areas and learning with some depth in one discipline.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts professional ethics bioethics generalist specialization Source Type: blogs

California Court Hears Motion for Veterans to Access Medical Aid in Dying
I hope you are following the case that the End of Life Liberty Project is litigating on behalf of veterans in the California Veterans Homes to access the same range of end of life options as other Californians. Right now, a dying Vet who chooses death via medical aid in dying will be thrown out of the Home pursuant to regulations adopted by Cal-Vet. On behalf of veterans residing in the Yountville home in Napa, the ELLP is pursuing a claim against Cal-Vet for adopting an entirely unnecessary, pernicious regulation, rife with both procedural and substantive failings. ELLP seeks a writ of mandate from the...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - October 1, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Parity Arguments for ‘Physician Aid-in-Dying’ (PAD) for Psychiatric Disorders: Their Structure and Limits
This post is presented in collaboration with the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read the entire issue by clicking here. by Marie E. Nicolini, Chris Gastmans & Scott Y. H. Kim Kious and Battin (K&B) argue that psychiatric PAD (PPAD) should be legal in the US, based on a ‘parity’ argument. This is the most popular approach to argue for PPAD. What K&B add is that since, in their view, the parity argument is valid, there is a dilemma because PPAD conflicts with the practice of involuntary commitment in psychiatry.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB End of Life Care Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying in Minnesota & Wisconsin
I will be on Minnesota Public Radio tomorrow to discuss medical aid in dying. Earlier this month, the House Committee on Health and Human Services Policy held an informational hearing on HF 2152. Later this month, a similar bill was introduc... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Death in Court – Sarah Lynn Jones v. University of Michigan
Tomorrow is a court hearing on Sarah Lynn Jones' petition to enjoin Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor, Michigan from withdrawing organ-sustaining treatment from her 15-year-old son, Bobby Reyes.  The hospital claims that Bobby is dead. Jones disputes that.   (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Doctor-Knows-Best NHS Foundation Trust: a Business Proposal for the Health Secretary
By Charles Foster Informed consent, in practice, is a bad joke. It’s a notion created by lawyers, and like many such notions it bears little relationship to the concerns that real humans have when they’re left to themselves, but it creates many artificial, lucrative, and expensive concerns. Of course there are a few clinical situations […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Charles Foster Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Health Care professional ethics Research Ethics bioethics Charles Foster's Posts Current Affairs Information Ethics medical ethics Reflections regulation syndicated Uncategorized Virtue Source Type: blogs

Bioethics in Kentucky
I am heading to Kentucky this week to discuss medical aid in dying (MAID). As I familiarize myself with the landscape, I am humbled by the challenges facing Kentucky. Its citizens have a substantially higher cancer rate than anywhere else in the countr... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 29, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

National Council on Disability – First Report of Bioethics Series Examines Organ Transplant Discrimination
The National Council on Disability has released the first of five reports in a series on bioethics and disability. The first report, Organ Transplant Discrimination Against People with Disabilities, provides an overview of the ways people wi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 28, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Conflict in Detroit – Bobby Reyes
15-year-old Bobby Reyes suffered an asthma attack last week. Clinicians at Mott Children's Hospital in Ann Arbor subsequently determined that Bobby is brain dead. His mother disputes that and has sought a court injunction. There are now active brain d... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (September 24-27, 2019): #TheGoodDoctor, #TheResident, #NewAmsterdam, #CarolsSecondAct, #GreysAnatomy
The Good Doctor (Season 3; Episode 1): Cancer Diagnosis and Dementia; The Resident (Season 3; Episode 1): Profit over patients; New Amsterdam (Season 2; Episode 1): Social Justice; High Cost of Insulin; Carol’s Second Act (Season 1; Episode 1): Stereotyping Age; Grey’s Anatomy (Season 16; Episode 1): Too soon to die; ageism by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Welcome back to the new Fall season of medical dramas. This year is a return of familiar shows which may indicate the current interest in these shows has peaked (seems that legal shows are cycling back).… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts Social Justice ageism Source Type: blogs

TV Writers and Producers and Ethics: How Can I Help?
This post is presented in collaboration with the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read the entire issue by clicking here. by Eric Manheimer, MD SENSE OF URGENCY The year 2016, with the election of Donald Trump, intensified a sense of urgency in many arenas, including health care. It was clear his administration would usher in assaults on the standards, rules, and ethics that were the glue binding truth and storytelling in every area of society. Several TV medical shows were sunsetting, and two showrunners were interested in acquiring my book 12 Patients: Life and Death at Bellevue Hospital; both mentioned a sense of...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 27, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts Media Medical Humanities @12PatientsMD #NreAmsterdam #TwelvePatients Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Conflict in Arizona Court – Ruben Vati
On September 15, clinicians at HonorHealth John C. Lincoln Medical Center in Phoenix diagnosed 26-year-old Ruben Vati dead on neurologic criteria. He had been admitted for a drug overdoes on September 11.  But his family does not believe or accep... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

When Might Human Germline Editing Be Justified?
Last month, an international commission convened to consider whether and how germline editing – changing the genes passed on to children and future generations -- should proceed. The discussions focused mainly on the safety risks of the technology, which, while important, are not the only issues to consider. Any conversation regarding germline editing must also honestly and thoroughly assess the potential benefits of the technology, which, for several reasons, are more limited than generally acknowledged. The post When Might Human Germline Editing Be Justified? appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Children and Families CRISPR gene editing Hastings Bioethics Forum Human Reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Italy Constitutional Court Approves Medical Aid in Dying
In 2014, a traffic accident left 37-year-old music producer and motocross driver Fabiano Antoniani both tetraplegic and blind. In 2017, Marco Cappato drove Antoniani  to Switzerland where he was helped to die. A Milan court has been try... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Why do we do this?
Many of the posts on this blog involve cautions that there are things in medicine which we are capable of doing and which some want to do that we should not do. Much of the time those cautions go unheeded by our society. For fifty years we have been saying that we should not perform … Continue reading "Why do we do this?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 26, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Genetics Health Care abortion bioethics biotechnology Ethical Method / Grounding reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bob ’s Choice: Why a Seattle Man Chose Death with Dignity (video)
KING-TV, an NBC-affiliated television station in Seattle, has posted a documentary on Bob Fuller's decision to die with dignity following a cancer diagnosis. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Professional Association ’s Complicity with Tyranny
by Bandy X. Lee M.D., M.Div., Edwin B. Fisher Ph.D., and Leonard L. Glass M.D., M.P.H. In the spring, we assessed the Mueller report from a mental health perspective because of the wealth and quality of content that rendered it useful for a capacity evaluation of the president.  We concluded that the president fell short of every metric for rational, considered decision making capacity.  As more than a thousand former federal prosecutors came forth with an opinion that Trump would have been charged if he were not president, hundreds of mental health professionals have endorsed our assessment.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 25, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bandy Lee Tags: Featured Posts Politics professional ethics Psychiatric Ethics American Psychiatric Association APA Goldwater Rule Source Type: blogs

1000 People Described How They ’d Find Happiness — Here’s Who Succeeded
Happiness doesn’t always come easily. Some people seem naturally happy, like they inherited the right gene or were born into the right circumstances. Many other people struggle to find happiness. Perhaps even more people hope to become happier than they … Continue reading → The post 1000 People Described How They’d Find Happiness — Here’s Who Succeeded appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Data of the dead participant: what ’s the right thing to do?
by Marieke Bak, MSc, MA, PhD(c) When people die nowadays, they no longer leave behind only physical assets. Their estate includes large amounts of personal data that remain in existence after they pass away. Creating a digital will may be a sensible way to posthumously control digital assets like Facebook pages or Google search histories. However, a recent survey found that the vast majority of us never discuss what should happen to our data after death. When it comes to medical data, particularly those collected in the context of research, the situation is similar.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Marieke Bak Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Genetics Human Subjects Research & IRBs Privacy Research Ethics Science Source Type: blogs

Dementia Values & Priorities Tool – from Compassion & Choices
A dementia diagnosis can be devastating. Documenting your preferences can help ensure that you get care that is consistent with your values and priorities. Compassion & Choices' new "Dementia Values & Priorities Tool" will help you identify yo... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 24, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethical Issues in OB/GYN Inspire Board Service
Sandra Stites, MDBoard Chair, Center for Practical BioethicsMy first exposure to the Center for Practical Bioethics was as a guest at the Annual Dinner event with my husband, who is a physician at the University of Kansas. But it was my experience as an OB/GYN physician that really sparked my desire to get more involved. In my practice as an OB/GYN, and especially in OB, ethics comes into play from day one throughout pregnancy. I can remember one of my first patients decades ago, a senior at a local high school, who wasn’t allowed to graduate because she was pregnant. And with the growth of technology in me...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Bioethics Tags: Health Care bioethics clinical ethics service OB/GYN syndicated Source Type: blogs

“The Homeless Situation” – Reflections of a Neighbor and Doctor
by Suzanne Minor, MD, FAAP The subject of the email read “MDC Commissioners Meeting to Address the Homeless,” the body asking me to attend the Commissioners Meeting to describe my challenges in dealing with the “homeless situation in our area” in order to force the Homeless Trust to allocate dollars to target the Miami homeless […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care Social Justice Diversity & Inclusion identity formation medical professionalism syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Should a Catholic Hospital be Permitted to Fire a Doctor for Trying to Provide Legal Physician Aid in Dying to a Patient?
A Catholic physician who invokes conscientious objection to refuse offering a legal service in a secular institution is legally protected from retaliation by their employer.  However, a secular physician who attempts to invoke conscience legislation to provide a legal service in a Catholic institution is not legally protected.  In the bioethics literature on conscientious objection, this is sometimes referred to as the asymmetry problem.   This is precisely the situation that has played out recently in Colorado where a veteran physician, Dr. Barbara Morris, was fired after suing her employer for the rig...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care conscientious clause physician assisted suicide syndicated Source Type: blogs

Une Bonne Mort – Seattle Death & Dying Conference
Having just returned from a superb death & dying conference in Seattle, I am delighted to see another program there coming up on Friday, November 1, 2019. This one day educational death and dying seminar dedicated to helping us better ca... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 23, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

How to Die in California (video)
The San Francisco Public Library presented a terrific "How to Die" panel earlier this summer.  Expert speakers addressed the fundamentals of hospice, medical aid in dying, the Final Exit Network, and other exit options. The program begi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Build Your Own Coffin – Miriam ’ s Dead Good Adventure
I just discovered a  tremendous show on BBC Two called "Miriam's Dead Good Adventure." Inimitable actress Miriam Margolyes is on a mission to confront her fear of ageing and death and tackle our greatest taboo - our own mortality. Miria... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Can Bioethics Light Up the Vaping Issue?
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Over 530 (as of 9/17) users of e-cigarettes have been stricken with a vaping-related lung illness and 8 people have diedfrom this new affliction.  The reports span 38 states and the U.S. Virgin Isles. The FDA and CDC have begun investigationsinto these lung illnesses resulting in a September 10 letter to Juul—a large manufacturer of e-cigarettes and cartridges—that they violated federal law by stating their product is “safer” than other forms of tobacco.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Cultural Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Public Health vaping Source Type: blogs