Advance Directives for SED and Euthanasia
There is growing interest in advance directives for stopping eating and drinking, especially as a way to avoid living in late-stage dementia. ADs for SED are legitimate under existing law in most U.S. states and Canadian provinces. But what if the inc... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

After the Surge: Prioritizing the Backlog of Delayed Hospital Procedures
The rewards of social distancing are beginning to accrue in former hotspots such as Seattle, the New York metropolitan area, and the San Francisco Bay Area, where the number of new Covid-19 cases requiring hospitalization is declining. Assuming the rewards hold in the face of pressures to reopen the economy, hospitals will now face challenges of reopening their own nonpandemic services for patients whose elective surgeries and other procedures were postponed. Which patients should get priority? The post After the Surge: Prioritizing the Backlog of Delayed Hospital Procedures appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care hospital triage syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Center for Ethics Education Celebrates Juneteenth
In honor of Juneteenth, the Fordham University Center for Ethics Education gathered articles and other resources for understanding and celebrating Juneteenth. ARTICLES “The Historical Legacy of Juneteenth” National Museum of African American History & Culture “How to take action on Juneteenth to celebrate Freedom Day” Mashable “Why celebrating Juneteenth is more important now than ever” Vox […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Justice Social Justice action anti-racism Center for Ethics Education Fordham University Center for Ethics Education In the News juneteenth Newsfeed syndicated Source Type: blogs

Victoria Voluntary Assisted Dying Law – One Year Anniversary
The Victoria Voluntary Assisted Dying Act 2017 came into effect on June 19, 2019. For the past year, Victorians who are at the end of life and who meet strict eligibility criteria can request access to voluntary assisted dying (VAD), elsewhere called ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Victoria Hospital Honors Advance Directive for Stopping Eating and Drinking (AD for SED)
Peter Eastman and colleagues describe in the Medical Journal of Australia how they honored an advance directive for stopping eating and drinking (AD for SED).  The patient's AD stated that if he was “in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease or other incurable, advanced dementing disease and if my appointed health care agent concludes after consultation with my primary health care provider that I am unable to make informed decisions about my health care, and I am unable to feed myself, continuing life would have no value for me” The AD provided in that situation all life‐prolonging therapies should be wi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Victoria Hospital Honors Advance Directive for Stopping Eating and Drinking (AD for SED)
Peter Eastman and colleagues describe in the Medical Journal of Australia how they honored an advance directive for stopping eating and drinking (AD for SED).  The patient's AD stated that if he was “in advanced stages of Alzheimer's disease or other incurable, advanced dementing disease and if my appointed health care agent concludes after consultation with my primary health care provider that I am unable to make informed decisions about my health care, and I am unable to feed myself, continuing life would have no value for me” The AD provided in that situation all life‐prolonging therapies should be wi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Uncertainty, Arrogance, and Mourning in the time of Pandemic
As I write this I have been fielding messages from a friend and interlocutor who, a knowledgeable health industry professional, seems quite confident that had President Trump been successfully impeached—or, better, never elected—the COVID-19 pandemic would not have been such a trouble for us.  And there may well be something, more than a little something, … Continue reading "Uncertainty, Arrogance, and Mourning in the time of Pandemic" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health syndicated Source Type: blogs

“You Can See Your Loved One Now.” Can Visitor Restrictions During Covid Unduly Influence End-of-Life Decisions?
One of the factors considered most important by dying patients and their families is the opportunity to be together. For many of our hospitalized patients in palliative care, the presence of loved ones at the bedside is such a given that we don’t even address it explicitly in advance care planning discussions. So, it comes as no surprise that Covid- 19-related visitor restrictions affecting hospitalized patients might impact end-of-life decision-making, potentially in ways that are ethically problematic. The post “You Can See Your Loved One Now.” Can Visitor Restrictions During Covid Unduly Influence End-...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care COVID-19 end of life End of life decisions Hastings Bioethics Forum hospital visitor restrictions syndicated Source Type: blogs

Science Isn ’t Meant To Be Followed
Science cannot lead us out of this pandemic. Whatever paths we take to navigate COVID-19 need to be chosen through political processes. The true role of science is to illuminate these pathways, guiding our policy choices by showing us what’s at stake. The post Science Isn’t Meant To Be Followed appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care COVID-19 health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

UK Court Authorizes Withdrawing Life-Sustaining Treatment over Parents ’ Objections
This headline might be unusual if it referenced a U.S. court. But it is hardly unusual for a British court to authorize withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment over parental or surrogate objections. Clinicians at Sheffield Teaching Hospit... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethics Consultation in COVID Times
Q:  What happens to clinical ethics consultation in a pandemic?A:  Ethics consultation continues, only more so.During the first few months of the coronavirus pandemic, with a significantly lower overall inpatient census and fewer providers seeing outpatients, ethics consultation at the University of Kansas Health System (UKHS) increased rather than decreased. Not all of the increase is COVID related. Most consultations reflect issues that arise during normal times as well.Typical Issues, New PerspectivesSome consultation has been COVID specific, including participation on the UKHS Pandemic Triage Team assisting i...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Bioethics Tags: Health Care bioethics covid 19 ethics consult syndicated Source Type: blogs

Baruch A. Brody Lecture in Bioethics (Call for Nominations)
Nominate a colleague for the 2021 Baruch A. Brody Award and Lecture in Bioethics by August 7, 2020. The Baylor College of Medicine Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Houston Methodist, and Rice University Department of Philosophy established... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Lost Art of Dying: Ethical Considerations in Facing our Mortality
Join Lydia Dugdale to discuss her book The Lost Art of Dying: Reviving Forgotten Wisdom. Never in our lifetimes has sickness and death been brought into view as it has during the COVID-19 pandemic. How are we to make sense of human finitude? A six hundred-year-old book provides an answer. In the wake of western Europe’s bubonic plague outbreak of the 1350s, a text was published offering advice to help the living prepare for a good death. The Ars Moriendi—or Art of Dying—made clear that to die well, one first had to live well. When Dugdale discovered this medieval book, it was a revelation. Inspired b...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Non-Beneficial Treatment at the End of Life (Eliana Close & James Downar)
The Australian Center for Health Law Research has a coffee with a colleague video series. In this episode Eliana Close (Brisbane) discussed non-beneficial treatment with James Downar (Ottawa). (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The role of the ethics consultant in triage: an Italian experience
by Mario Picozzi, MD Ph.D., Federico Nicoli, Ph.D., Paolo Severgnini, MD The Varese Hospital is located in northern Lombardy and has a total of 582 beds. Last April, 206 of these were dedicated to positive Covid19 patients and 47 were reserved for the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). During the emergency, we have chosen to carry out triage with reference to the criterion of proportionality. This criterion considers both clinical indications and patient preferences, along with treatment costs. We have decided to use this criterion for two reasons: first of all, it actually allows a choice on a case-by-case basis, without falling ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear #reportsfromaroundtheworld COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

The Problem with Retractions
It is not uncommon, at least in my small town, for our local newspaper to publish, usually on its front page, the news of a malpractice case, complete with the initial accusations of incompetence directed against the physician in question and description of the horrible medical outcome suffered by the patient. The physician’s reputation is … Continue reading "The Problem with Retractions" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Federal Court Critical of MAID Effectiveness
Several death-sentenced inmates incarcerated in Arkansas challenged the constitutionality of execution methods. McGehee v. Hutchinson, No. 4:17-CV-00179 KGB (E.D. Ark. May 31, 2020). The court considered several alternative methods such as fi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Fordham RETI Alum Dr. Faith Fletcher Featured in Rolling Stone Discussing Anti-Black Racism as a Public Health Crisis
For years, leaders in public health, including members of the American Public Health Association (APHA) have been calling for the recognition of racism as a public health issue. On their website, the APHA states that racism is a “driving force of the social determinants of health (like housing, education and employment) and is a barrier […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Health Disparities Public Health American Public Health Association anti-black racism APHA bioethics Contemporary Ethical Issues COVID-19 Elizabeth Yuko Faith Fletcher Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Ford Source Type: blogs

Human Challenge Studies for Covid-19 Vaccine: Questions about Benefits and Risks
Experts in infectious disease and public health warn that the Covid-19 pandemic will be with us until there is an effective vaccine, possibly 12 to 18 months in the future. This situation has given rise to calls for human challenge studies, in which healthy volunteers are injected with an experimental vaccine and then infected with the disease to test the vaccine’s efficacy. Is this ethically justifiable? The post Human Challenge Studies for Covid-19 Vaccine: Questions about Benefits and Risks appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Ethics Health Care Research Ethics COVID-19 Covid-19 vaccine global health Hastings Bioethics Forum human challenge trials syndicated Source Type: blogs

COVID-19: Healthcare Worker Sorrows and Strengths
by Christine Grady, RN Ph.D., and Connie Ulrich, Ph.D. RN FAAN In Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Claudius famously notes “When sorrows come, they come not single spies, but in battalions.” Today, during the coronavirus pandemic, we are seeing and hearing “battalions” of sorrow reflected on the faces and in the voices of nurses and other healthcare workers, as well as from patients and families across the global community. Nurses and other healthcare workers are often working under grueling workplace conditions. They are physically and mentally exhausted from the complexity of care needs for COVID-19 pa...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts professional ethics Professionalism Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 nurses nursing Source Type: blogs

Voluntarily Stopping Eating & Drinking (VSED): An Overview
Join my coauthor Judith Schwarz for "Voluntarily Stopping Eating & Drinking (VSED): An Overview" as part of the Reimagine: Life, Loss, & Love series on June 24, 2020. Increasing numbers of suffering New Yorkers are looking for ways to achieve a peaceful death that does not put their loved ones in legal jeopardy. They seek a legal means to hasten death when they conclude that their suffering has become intolerable. New York State does not yet provide a legal means for a physician’s medical aid in dying (MAID), and even when such a law is passed, many suffering New Yorkers will be excluded as can...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

More Secret Unilateral DNR Orders in the UK
In the latest in a long series of similar cases, Lesley Roberts found that Inverclyde Royal Hospital had entered a DNACPR for her mother Letitia after neither consultation with nor consent from the patient or family. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Overview of Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking to Hasten Death
Jane Lowers and colleagues offer a nice "Overview of Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking to Hasten Death" in the Annals of Palliative Medicine. Voluntarily stopping eating and drinking is a means of hastening death. Unlike euthanasia or medical a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Defunding the Police is a Bioethical Issue
by Nicole Martinez-Martin, JD, PhD Many organizations that are working to end police brutality (the #BlackBioethics Toolkit provides a list of many relevant resources) advise that just reforming police policy is insufficient to address police violence– there need to be sustained efforts for cities to restructure and reprioritize how social services and crime are addressed. ‘Defunding the police’ is a proposal focused on reallocating police funding towards people and services in marginalized communities. While the idea of “defunding police” can seem radical to some, many people have also been s...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Justice Psychiatric Ethics Social Justice #blackbioethics #defundthepolice #mentalhealth racism Source Type: blogs

Smoking Cigarettes (My Circumstances Made Me Do It)
Rates of cigarette smoking have dropped substantially in the US over the past few decades. But lots of Americans still smoke, and the burden of tobacco-related illness does not fall evenly across our population. That is tragic under normal circumstances, with tobacco use leading to heart attacks, strokes, cancers, and emphysema, to name but a […] The post Smoking Cigarettes (My Circumstances Made Me Do It) appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Peter Ubel Tags: Health Care Public Health Health & Well-being Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Case for Medical Aid in Dying in New York
On Tuesday, June 16, 2020, at 4:00 CDT, five panelists will discuss the Medical Aid in Dying Act being considered by the New York legislature. Notably, the panelists offer  their perspectives as a (1) doctor, (2) lawyer, (3) legislator, (4) p... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying: Dancing with Prognostic Dilemmas
The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying has released the third in its series of video interviews on topics of interest to aid-in-dying clinicians. This interview focuses on the common dilemma of difficult prognoses when evaluating pati... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Committing to Fight Racism
We have reached a very sad, painful moment in the United States. It feels like a cascade of calamities, one compounding the next. An infectious disease pandemic that we cannot yet cure has precipitated an economic crisis. An episode of police brutality against a black man has added the name George Floyd to a long list of victims of unfair policing practices in black communities. Bioethicists have not been doing enough in our professional capacities to actively denounce or address the persistent problems of structural racism. We invite our fellow bioethics colleagues to join us in candid, uncomfortable conversations about w...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics COVID-19 George Floyd Hastings Bioethics Forum Police brutality racism structural racism syndicated Source Type: blogs

From Ventilators to Vaccines: Reframing the Ethics of Resource Allocation
by R. Thomas Day, Bradley S. Guidry, Brian C. Drolet, Ellen W. Clayton The United States has never experienced the grim realities of a resource-limited healthcare environment like that brought by Covid-19. Dire projections of overwhelmed ICUs introduced the public to novel concepts such as flattening the curve, triaging, and resource allocation. In response, hospitals and states moved quickly to update resource scarcity protocols to preserve ventilators and personal protective equipment. Fortunately, massive public health efforts were able to slow viral spreading enough that medical systems were only overwhelmed in a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Decision making Featured Posts Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Decisions Made for Incapacitated Patients Often Not What Families Want
Researchers from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University report in JAMA Open that nearly half of the time medical treatments and orders received for incapacitated patients were not compatible with goals of care requested by their surrogate decision makers. The most common disagreement involved a “full-code” medical order prepared for patients whose surrogates had indicated preference for less aggressive care options. Discord between orders and surrogate directions is not always cause for alarm. Because surrogates are often poor representatives of patient wishes, I have argued that they should sometimes...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Utilitarian Truth-Seeker
Written by Stefan Schubert Utilitarianism is often associated with two psychological features. First, acceptance of instrumental harm for the greater good. The utilitarian is famously willing to kill one to save five in the trolley problem. Second, impartial beneficence. The utilitarian is equally concerned with everyone’s well-being, irrespective of their gender, nationality, or species. And […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Stefan Schubert Tags: Ethics Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Measure Twice and Cut Once: The Value of Health Care Ethicists in the Pandemic
The major success story of health care ethicists in the pandemic has been their role in establishing ventilator triage policies. But they have more to offer the C-suite of health care institutions. The post Measure Twice and Cut Once: The Value of Health Care Ethicists in the Pandemic appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care clinical ethicists COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum health care ethics health care institutions Pandemic Planning syndicated Triage Source Type: blogs

Racial justice and being created in the image of God
I have a friend who teaches public health. We share a common faith and a common commitment to living out that faith. However, we have different priorities. In medicine he focuses on the overall health of populations, while I tend to focus more on the needs of individual people and the relationship between the patient … Continue reading "Racial justice and being created in the image of God" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day 2020
June 15 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD).  Elder abuse is defined in state law, and the definitions vary from state to state. The American Bar Association Commission on Law and Aging (ABA COLA) has updated its resource of state elder abuse definitions to help lawyers understand elder abuse in their state. In addition, ABA COLA has updated their mandatory and permissive reporting chart, as well as the power of attorney chart. The statutory charts look at selected issues in the law and the citations chart helps you find the complete text of elder abuse and long-term care ombudsmen laws in every stat...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Our Response to Racism Should Not Be More Unpaid Work for Black Faculty, Part I
This essay is part of a 2-part series on the burdens placed on black faculty in academic bioethics. The second part, by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. can be read by clicking here. by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. During the beginning of the #METOO movement, female academics named those who had harassed them, universities created (or expanded) reporting structures and formed committees to help improve conditions for women on campus, and movements were made to try new ways of working such as restorative justice.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Education Featured Posts professional ethics #blackbioethics ally Source Type: blogs

Our Response to Racism Should Not Be More Unpaid Work for Black Faculty, Part II
This essay is part of a 2-part series on the burdens placed on black faculty in academic bioethics. The second part, by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. can be read by clicking here. by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. Since the killing of George Floyd and the protests that ensued, the amount of free labor requested of me has been seemingly endless; everyday a new request comes in. I consistently have to balance my normal duties to my university, my students, the bioethics profession, and my research, along with new requests to perform free labor for the general public.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Featured Posts professional ethics #blackbioethics Source Type: blogs

Individual Freedom or Public Health? A False Choice in the Covid Era
When scientists first suggested population-wide social distancing as the only feasible way to suppress Covid-19, they were the first to admit it may not work in a free society. We are now months into placing mass restrictions on human behavior to suppress a virus that lacks an effective vaccine or treatment. Now is the time to ask: is this the authoritarian nightmare many feared, or will freedom and democracy survive Covid-19? The post Individual Freedom or Public Health? A False Choice in the Covid Era appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health authoritarianism COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum safety net Social Distancing syndicated Source Type: blogs