Pandemic Ethics: Testing times: An ethical framework and practical recommendations for COVID-19 testing for NHS workers
Dr Alberto Giubilini, Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Uehiro  Centre for Practical Ethics and Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities was part of an independent rapid-response project to develop an ethical framework for COVID-19 swab testing for NHS workers. Following a stakeholder consultation, the expert group have published a report identifying ethical considerations and providing […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 23, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Public Health Alberto Giubilini's Posts Pandemic Ethics regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Loud Silence of Racism: It is Killing Us All
This post will also appear as an editorial in a special January 2021 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics by Bridgette L. Jones, MD MS Audre Lorde wrote in her essay The Transformation of Silence into Language to Action, “I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood (Lourde 1984). I recently decided to tell my story, for the first time in my life, to the staff at my hospital during a gathering service for George Floyd. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts #blackbioethics racism Source Type: blogs

Advance Directive Completion Rate Increases 500%
Last month, I blogged how Gallup measured an uptick in advance directive completion rates. This month, a study from the University of Pennsylvania measured an even larger increase (almost 500%). Researchers examined how many people completed advance d... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Language
Language used to describe the response to the pandemic can illuminate, and it can distort. Here I focus on language that obfuscates thinking about the pandemic. As the death toll mounted in New York City in April, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was reported to have declared, “Ventilators are to this war what bombs were… Read more The post Pandemic Language appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Guest Post: Is it Wrong to Lower Your Chances of Doing What You Ought to Do?
Written by Farbod Akhlaghi (University of Oxford) Suppose you have a moral obligation to take care of your ailing parent tomorrow. If you did something that would lower your chances of fulfilling that moral obligation – like going out partying all night tonight – would you thereby have done something morally wrong? We do things […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Guest Post syndicated Source Type: blogs

Abortion, Res judicata, Stare decisis and the “Rightness of Things”
Oddly, I enjoy reading Supreme Court decisions, particularly the dissents, even though I am not a lawyer. I gain similar enjoyment watching a good game of chess even though I am not a great chess player. Nerd that I am, I think I become smarter for the effort in both cases. I beg the reader’s … Continue reading "Abortion, Res judicata, Stare decisis and the “Rightness of Things”" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care abortion bioethics Health Care Practice human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

Canadian Tribunals Side with Physicians in Three Medical Futility Cases
Over the past few weeks, Canadian tribunals have wrestled with a number of medical futility cases. Here are some of them. Two were decided by the Ontario Health Professions Appeal and Review Board. This tribunal reviews cases adjudicated by the Inquir... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ambulance Charters During the COVID-19 Pandemic and Equitable Access to Scarce Resources
by Daniel Du Pont, MD, MBE and Jill Baren, MD, MS, MBA, FACEP, FAAP The novel coronavirus outbreak, like any pandemic, has brought with it many difficult choices. When demand for medical resources exceeds supply, healthcare providers have to make excruciating decisions about which patients will be offered treatment—not just intensive treatments, but any basic life support measures. The fundamental problem of rationing is that the distribution of hospital resources and services, such as ICU beds or ventilators, is a zero-sum game: If the healthcare system is overwhelmed, each patient who receives treatment represents ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Justice Social Justice #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying for Alzheimer ’ s? Unlikely, Try SED by AD Instead
Conclusion (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Patients Still Overestimate Success of CPR
Studies showing that public overestimates the success of CPR have been around for decades. One more was published this week in Emergency Medicine Journal. Sacramento researchers asked 500 emergency department patients and their companions. Here is wh... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

If Beale St. Was In Gotham
I’d never read James Baldwin. Why this is precisely, I’m not sure. We could go into the structural and personal reasons I, an English lit major, managed to make it three decades without, but that’s another post. I hadn’t read or seen any Batman anything (yes, including the animated series) until I was in my [...] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Kyle Munkittrick Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Court Revokes Health Care Agent ’ s Powers
Health care agents must act consistent with the incapacitated patient's known wishes. If those are unknown, they must act within the patient's best interests. When they materially deviate from these duties, agents (like other types of surrogates) can a... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Betrothed During the 2020 Pandemic By J. Russell Teagarden
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: GalN Tags: Health Care Current Topics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Improving the Informed Consent Process for Seniors Regarding AICDs: The Need for Bioethicist Involvement
by Arnold R. Eiser, MD MACP Our healthcare system is failing our most senior citizens by assuming they want and need to receive maximal technological intervention despite modest or minimal benefit to them and the increasing of substantial discomfort to them. Every year in the United States about 140,000 automated implantable defibrillators (AICD) are implanted for primary and secondary prevention of sudden death (probably less in this COVID pandemic). Over 60% of AICDs are implanted in patients 65 years or older with 42% in people over 70 years of age.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts Informed Consent Technology AICD Source Type: blogs

The “Give Back”: Is There Room For It?
by Nneka Sederstrom, PhD, MPH, MA, FCCP, FCCM In my previous article, Unblinded, I challenged the actions of using the crisis standards of care scoring systems to allocate scares resources like ventilators and argued against a color-blind ideology. To take that argument further it is time to address the question of “if not that scoring system, then what?” The Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score or SOFA is the clinical tool that has been most widely accepted as the scoring mechanism to address which patient, in a crisis standards of care situation, has the better survival potential if provided the scarce r...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Nneka Sederstrom Tags: Featured Posts Health Disparities Justice Social Justice #blackbioethics #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 racism Source Type: blogs

American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying – Videos
The American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying has completed the accreditation process for CME and CE credits for online learning, for physicians, nurses, and social workers.If you were unable to attend the National Clinici... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Michigan Physician Agrees to Treat Tinslee Lewis Despite Repeated Determinations Treatment Is Non-Beneficial and Inappropriate
Last year, Clinicians at Cook Children's Hospital determined that continued life-sustaining treatment for Tinslee Lewis offered no benefit and would be "cruel" and "unethical." Accordingly, they planned to stop that treatment even over her mother's obj... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly Patient Modesty) Volume 112
The ongoing anguish being presented by the participants on this web blog topic is whether being a patient who doesn't conform ("be yourself") with the behavior and requests or even demands of the medical system itself  will provide harm to the pat... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Video Series: Why Parental Status Matters When Allocating Scarce Medical Resources
Which patients should we treat, if we can’t treat them all? The Covid-19 pandemic has brought questions about how to allocate scarce medical resources to the forefront. In this Thinking Out Loud interview with Katrien Devolder, Philosopher Moti Gorin (Colorado State University) argues that parents (or primary caregivers) of a dependent child should (sometimes) get […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Health Care Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics resource allocation syndicated Video Series Youtube interview Source Type: blogs

New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression
This event "New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression" will stream on July 22, 2020. See also here. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression
This event "New Horizon in Palliative Care: Psilocybin Therapy for Relief of Anxiety and Depression" will stream on July 23, 2020. See also here. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Daughter Convicted of Attempted Murder Says Mom Wanted Me to Do It
Kimberly Hopkins pleaded guilty to zip-tying her 80-year-old mother's hands and trying to put a plastic bag with helium over her head. In October 2019, she was convicted of attempted first-degree murder. But in a recent Tennessee parole hearing, Hopkins claims that her mother asked her to to do it. "I would never have done anything that I did without my mother’s permission." Hopkins apparently used the book FINAL EXIT to make the planned death look like a suicide. But what Hopkins did is very different from the inert gas bag method used by the Final Exit Network. Their exit guides do not handle th...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Life Kit: Planning For The End of a Life
Talking about death makes many of us uncomfortable, so we don't plan for it. NPR's Life Kit offers tips for starting an advanced directive to prepare for a good death. After all, we wear a seatbelt even though we do not expect to be in a car accident. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Pandemic Ethics: Moral Reasoning in a Pandemic [Guest Post]
Cross-Posted with The Boston Review By Professor Frances Kamm, Harvard University Policy discussions during the pandemic have raised concerns for me, as a moral philosopher, about how policy analysts and policy makers are thinking about deaths from COVID-19 and the right way to combat them. The policy discussions I have in mind have ranged from […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Guest Post Pandemic Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Veterans Affairs OIG Issues Caution on Goals of Care Compliance
The Veterans Affairs Office of Inspector General just released an inspection report of the Oscar G. Johnson VA Medical Center in Iron Mountain, Michigan. Care coordination concerning life-sustaining treatment decisions was one of the four focus areas. VHA requires practitioners to initiate goals of care conversations with high-risk patients—including hospice patients or their surrogates—within a time frame that meets the medical needs of the patient or at the time of a triggering event. The GOC conversations are discussion between a healthcare provider and a patient or surrogate to help define the patient&...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Making the Call Podcast Tackles Medical Aid in Dying
Dr. Zeke Emanuel ("the architect of the Affordable Care Act”) and Dr. Jonathan Moreno (“the quietly most interesting bioethicist of our time”) talk to Peg Sandeen about medical aid in dying in their latest MAKING THE CALL podcast. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Before We Turn to Digital Contract Tracing for Covid, Remember Surveillance in the Sixties
Is it unrealistic to believe that phone apps for digital Covid contact tracing can be designed and regulated in ways that prevent the information they collect from being misused? It's worth remembering surveillance of Vietnam War protesters and Martin Luther King Jr. The post Before We Turn to Digital Contract Tracing for Covid, Remember Surveillance in the Sixties appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Privacy COVID-19 digital contact tracing Hastings Bioethics Forum phone apps Science and Society surveillance syndicated Source Type: blogs

Tinslee Lewis v. Cook Children ’ s Hospital (Tex. App. 2020)
We are still waiting for the decision and opinion from the Texas Second Court of Appeals in Tinslee Lewis v. Cook Children's Hospital. The case challenges the constitutionality of the dispute resolution provisions in the Texas Advance Directives A... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A new cautionary tale for heritable genome editing
A fundamental concern about applying gene editing to human embryos is how to limit the risk of errors, or “off-target” effects.  One makes an edit to change a bad gene’s defect, and presumably prevent the disease the defective gene would cause.  But the current methods to do that, although apparently highly selective, might still make … Continue reading "A new cautionary tale for heritable genome editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Covid-19 Makes Clear that Bioethics Must Confront Health Disparities
With some reluctance, I’ve come to the sad realization the COVID-19 pandemic has been a stress test for bioethics, a field of study that intersects medicine, law, the humanities and the social sciences. As both a physician and medical ethicist, I arrived at this conclusion after spending months at what was once the epicenter of the pandemic: New York City. I was overseeing a 24/7 bioethics consultation service. The post Covid-19 Makes Clear that Bioethics Must Confront Health Disparities appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Health Disparities bioethics COVID-19 hospitals New York City syndicated Source Type: blogs

Coronavirus Contact Tracing
For three years during the 1960s, I worked for various organizations, all of us trying to end the War in Vietnam.  At one point, I was employed by the Fifth Avenue Peace Parade Committee, while my boyfriend worked for the Student Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam (affectionately known as “The Mobe”).  Both of … Continue reading Coronavirus Contact Tracing (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Exploitation of Homeless Populations in Phase One Drug Trials
STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN PRIZE SECOND-PLACE WINNERBy Elizabeth Wood Last semester I read Carl Elliott’s “The Best-Selling, Billion Dollar Pills Tested on Homeless People.” He introduces a concerning ethical dilemma, namely, the use of homeless populations as participants in phase 1 drug trials. Learning about this practice made me very uncomfortable. As a student at […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Ethics Health Care Research Ethics Belmont Principles Belmont Report Center for Ethics Education clinical trial clinical trials exploitation Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Fordham University Student Voices Homelessnes Source Type: blogs

Policy Statements on Health Care Policy, Ethics, and End-of-Life Care
It has been professionally rewarding to co-author three policy statements on health care policy, ethics, and end-of-life care with the American Thoracic Society. All of these are available for free here. Making Medical Treatment Decisions for Unrepres... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Culture, Coma, and the Media – Online Course
Check out this course at Cardiff University. It explores how (un)consciousness, coma and the vegetative state are represented in the media.  This course allows you to engage with debates about the portrayal of patients and reporting of  ‘miracle’ recoveries, court cases and scientific breakthroughs. It addresses implications for family and public understandings. This course will help develop your understanding of ‘coma’ and your skills in writing for the media or being a critical media consumer or researcher, or supporting patients and their families. I like this page which includes interv...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Ethicists as a Force for Institutional Change and Policies to Promote Equality
In his recent JAMA article, Donald Berwick eloquently describes what he termed the “moral determinants of health,” by which he meant a strong sense of social solidarity in which people in the United States would “depend on each other for securing the basic circumstances of healthy lives,” reflecting a “moral law within.” Berwick’s work should serve as a call to action for bioethicists and clinical ethicists to consider what they can do to be forces of broad moral change in their institutions. The post Ethicists as a Force for Institutional Change and Policies to Promote Equality a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care activism bioethics COVID-19 George Floyd Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care inequality moral determinants of health racism social determinants of health syndicated Source Type: blogs

Public Service Announcement or a Step Too Far
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Tommye Austin is senior vice president and chief nursing officer at University Hospital in San Antonio. Like most Texas hospitals, UH has been hard hit by the pandemic in recent weeks and PPE is in short supply. Nurse Austin created a crafty N95 replacement mask that uses cloth fabric and air conditioning filters. She is passionate about masks and people protecting themselves from COVID-19. She regularly posts on social media and has spoken to the media about face coverings.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Media professional ethics Professionalism Public Health #covid19 #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Fanon is French
I’m re-reading Black Skin, White Masks as part of a “remember your critical theory so that you can defend it or critique it from a place of knowledge rather than memory” sort of process. I’m alternating between the 2020 best sellers and the critical canon. Between the World and Me was first, now Fanon (going [...] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Kyle Munkittrick Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Patient Consent for COVID-19 REGISTRY JAPAN and the Favipiravir Observational Study
by Kei Mukohara, MD, Ph.D., Tsunetoshi Mogi, MD COVID-19 REGISRY JAPAN(COVIREGI-JP, its official website [In Japanese])is an ongoing government-funded national registry study conducted principally at the National Center for Global Health and Medicine in collaboration with Fujita Health University, Hokkaido University, National Institute of Infectious Diseases and pharmaceutical companies. To create a national registry, it is requesting participating institutions to provide clinical data on hospitalized patients with COVID-19. The study is enrolling patients retrospectively and prospectively from January 1, 2020 to Janu...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (AMDA) Endorses National POLST Form
This month, the Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (AMDA) became the first national organization to formally endorse and support the adoption of a national POLST form. The national form was created because a single form—as opposed to just state-to-state form reciprocity—will make it easier, among other things:For providers to recognize a POLST form and  correctly interpret and follow POLST form orders, thereby enabling them to honor patient treatment preferences To conduct research and quality assurance activities, creating shared data for generalizable knowledge and ability to improve POLS...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Using the Pandemic as an Excuse to Limit Abortion
Several states, including Ohio, Alabama, Arkansas, Texas, Iowa, and Oklahoma, declared abortion a nonessential service at some point during the pandemic, meaning that it was effectively banned until the crisis passed. Supporters of the policies maintain that abortion is an elective procedure whose medical resources are better off used in the fight against the pandemic. But abortion opponents have been taking advantage of the current circumstances to limit abortion access. The post Using the Pandemic as an Excuse to Limit Abortion appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care abortion COVID-19 Hastings Bioethics Forum nonessential service syndicated Source Type: blogs