Early Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Reduces Risk Of Psychosis

Young people seeking help who are at high risk of developing psychosis could significantly reduce their chances of going on to develop a full-blown psychotic illness by getting early access to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), new research shows. Researchers from The University of Manchester found the risk of developing psychosis was more than halved for those receiving CBT at six, 12 and 18-24 months after treatment started...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental Health Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: While the review found some beneficial effects of I-C/BT for PTSD, the quality of the evidence was very low due to the small number of included trials. Further work is required to: establish non-inferiority to current first-line interventions, explore mechanisms of change, establish optimal levels of guidance, explore cost-effectiveness, measure adverse events, and determine predictors of efficacy and dropout. PMID: 30550643 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
Condition:   Somatic Symptom Disorders Intervention:   Behavioral: Cognitive-behavioural therapy group for individuals with somatic symptom disorders Sponsor:   St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton Not yet recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Following publication of the original article [1], the authors reported a typing mistake in the spelling of author Iain O ’Leary. The original article has been corrected.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
This study assessed therapist competence and patient clinical outcome during cognitive behaviour therapy training and 12+ months post-training. Trainee competence was assessed using audio-recorded sessions rated on the Cognitive Therapy Scale Revised at the beginning (n = 33) and end of training (n = 45), and at least 12 months post-training (n = 45). Pre-to-posttreatment clinical outcome for trainees’ patients during the course (n = 360) and post-training (n = 360) was evaluated using standardised self-report measures. The relationship betwee...
Source: Cognitive Therapy and Research - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Source Type: research
Following publication of the original article [1], the authors reported a typing mistake in the spelling of author Iain O ’Leary. The original article has been corrected.
Source: Trials - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Correction Source Type: research
Condition:   Substance Dependence Interventions:   Behavioral: Computer-based Training for Cognitive Behavioural Therapy;   Behavioral: Treatment As Usual Sponsor:   Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Recruiting
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Condition:   Mental Disorders Intervention:   Behavioral: Cognitive behavioral therapy Sponsor:   Ulrike Willutzki Enrolling by invitation
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
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