Effect of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on spasticity in adults with stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis

1. To determine the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on post-stroke spasticity. 2a. To determine the effect of different parameters (intensity, frequency, and duration) of TENS on spasticity reduction in adults with stroke; 2b. To determine the influence of time since stroke on the effectiveness of TENS on spasticity.
Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Source Type: research

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Source: International Journal of Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionCross-education via EMS may have a beneficial effect as an adjunct to conventional treatment methods. This study is retrospectively registered and is available atwww.clinicaltrials.gov (ID: NCT04113369).
Source: Neurological Sciences - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
This study demonstrated the feasibility of undertaking a trial of sensory electrical stimulation for post-stroke spasticity with caregivers delivering intervention in community. The study was not powered to detect efficacy of the interventions.Trial registration number: NCT02907775.Date 20-9-2016.
Source: Health and Technology - Category: Information Technology Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTranscutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is widely used as a non-pharmacological approach for pain relief in a variety of clinical conditions. This manuscript aimed to review the basic mechanisms and clinical applications regarding the use of TENS for alleviating the peripheral (PNP) and central neuropathic pain (CNP).Recent FindingsBasic studies on animal models showed that TENS could alleviate pain by modulating neurotransmitters and receptors in the stimulation site and its upper levels, including the spinal cord, brainstem, and brain. Besides, many clinical studies have investigated t...
Source: Current Pain and Headache Reports - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
Conclusion: This pilot study is the first to measure pain-free passive range of motion during electrical stimulation. Our findings demonstrate the lack of an acute effect of TENS and t-NMES on pain reduction. PMID: 31298627 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Top Stroke Rehabil Source Type: research
Authors: Kiper P, Turolla A PMID: 30805654 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine - Category: Rehabilitation Tags: J Rehabil Med Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: There is insufficient evidence to guide continence care of adults in the rehabilitative phase after stroke. As few trials tested the same intervention, conclusions are drawn from few, usually small, trials. CIs were wide, making it difficult to ascertain if there were clinically important differences. Only four trials had adequate allocation concealment and many were limited by poor reporting, making it impossible to judge the extent to which they were prone to bias. More appropriately powered, multicentre trials of interventions are required to provide robust evidence for interventions to improve urinary inco...
Source: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Cochrane Database Syst Rev Source Type: research
(1) To determine the effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on poststroke spasticity. (2) To determine the effect of different parameters (intensity, frequency, duration) of TENS on spasticity reduction in adults with stroke. (3) To determine the influence of time since stroke on the effectiveness of TENS on spasticity.
Source: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation - Category: Rehabilitation Authors: Tags: Review article (Meta-analysis) Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: There is strong evidence that TENS as an adjunct is effective in reducing lower limb spasticity when applied for more than 30 minutes over nerve or muscle belly in chronic stroke survivors. (Review protocol registered at PROSPERO: CRD42015020151). PMID: 30452892 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Health Physics - Category: Physics Authors: Tags: Arch Phys Med Rehabil Source Type: research
Abstract The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is an experimental paradigm known to produce a bodily illusion. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) combined with the RHI induces a stronger illusion than the RHI alone. Visuotactile stimulus synchrony is an important aspect of the RHI. However, the effect of TENS and visuotactile stimulus synchrony in TENS combined with the RHI remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of TENS and visuotactile stimulus synchrony on the embodiment of an artificial hand when using TENS combined with the RHI. The participants underwent four experi...
Source: Experimental Brain Research - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Exp Brain Res Source Type: research
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