SIEA Flap for a Total Parotidectomy Defect SIEA Flap for a Total Parotidectomy Defect

Is this reconstructive technique a safe and effective option for volume replacement after parotidectomy?ePlasty, Open Access Journal of Plastic Surgery
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - Category: Surgery Tags: Plastic Surgery & Aesthetic Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

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Source: European Journal of Anaesthesiology - Category: Anesthesiology Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
ObjectiveTo determine the effect on survival of periauricular region cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC) metastasizing to parotid region and cervical lymph nodes.MethodsFrom May 1995 to October 2013, consecutive patients with cSCC undergoing parotidectomy/neck dissection  ≥ 18 years without distant metastasis were included. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic data were analyzed. Uni‐ and multivariate analyses of disease‐specific survival and overall survival were performed. Statistical significance was set atP 
Source: The Laryngoscope - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Head and Neck Source Type: research
ConclusionParotid gland remains the most frequent site of salivary gland tumours (80%), with pleomorphic adenoma being the most common benign tumour. Triple assessment is still required to manage these cases adequately with stress on preoperative tissue diagnosis FNAB vs USS guided core biopsy.
Source: Annals of Medicine and Surgery - Category: General Medicine Source Type: research
AbstractPurpose of ReviewTo examine contemporary management of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) involving the temporal bone.Recent FindingsThe modified Pittsburgh criteria have gained acceptance by many institutions for staging, planning treatment and comparing outcomes. Often primary SCC as well as secondary cutaneous SCC involving the temporal bone can be managed in a similar fashion.SummaryT1 tumours should undergo lateral temporal bone resection (LTBR) due to the higher risk of positive margins and recurrence rates with lesser surgical procedures. T2 tumours require LTBR and superficial parotidectomy. T3 and T4 tumours of...
Source: Current Otorhinolaryngology Reports - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Conclusion parotidectomy is a safe and effective treatment for CP in case conservative therapy fails. There is no evidence of a distinct difference between SP and NTP regarding efficiency, facial nerve palsy or Frey syndrome. [...] Thieme Revinter Publicações Ltda Rio de Janeiro, BrazilArticle in Thieme eJournals: Table of contents  |  Abstract  |  open access Full text
Source: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Tags: Original Research Source Type: research
ConclusionsIn the present pilot study, the incidences of immediate and late facial nerve dysfunction were similar between patients with benign parotid tumors subjected to superficial parotidectomy with or without continuous intraoperative electromyographic neuromonitoring. However, immediate facial dysfunction was more severe among the non-monitored patients.
Source: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 15 October 2018Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial SurgeryAuthor(s): A. Ghassemi, A. Modabber, P.O. Brzoska, M. SababiAbstractWe studied 37 consecutive patients who had parotidectomies between 2008 and 2017 and who had vascular fat flaps inserted to replace the excised parotid tissue and prevent Frey syndrome. They were followed up for 1–9 years to check for the relevant symptoms. We studied 17 female and 20 male patients, mean age 52 (range 19–78) years. The flaps took a maximum of 17 minutes to dissect. There was no donor site morbidity, the vascular fat f...
Source: British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Source Type: research
The Laryngoscope, EarlyView.
Source: The Laryngoscope - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
We studied 37 consecutive patients who had parotidectomies between 2008 and 2017 and who had vascular fat flaps inserted to replace the excised parotid tissue and prevent Frey syndrome. They were followed up for 1 –9 years to check for the relevant symptoms. We studied 17 female and 20 male patients, mean age 52 (range 19–78) years. The flaps took a maximum of 17minutes to dissect. There was no donor site morbidity, the vascular fat flap was stable in all cases for up to nine years, and none of the patien ts complained of symptoms of Frey syndrome.
Source: The British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery - Category: ENT & OMF Authors: Source Type: research
ConclusionIn cases of slowly progressive facial paralysis the clinician needs to consider malignancy until proven otherwise. Without an identifiable primary malignancy, early algorithmic assessment of presenting characteristics may facilitate expedited clinical decision making and surgical management of malignancy involving the facial nerve. In cases of slowly progressive facial paralysis, when the time comes for surgical exploration and biopsy, head and neck surgeons must be aware that malignancy can exist entirely within the facial nerve, without pathologic changes on the surface of the nerve or in the surrounding tissue.
Source: American Journal of Otolaryngology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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