Could this be a new treatment for asthma?

Researchers at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, in collaboration with a team in Shanghai, believe the new treatment may even improve upon inhalers.
Source: the Mail online | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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CONCLUSIONS: We found that in patients with severe asthma, the prevalence of bronchiectasis is high and that bronchiectasis is associated with a longer asthma history, greater severity and, more importantly, chronic airflow obstruction. These findings are still insufficient evidence to considere features of asthma-bronchiectasis overlap syndrome, a distinct phenotype of severe asthma, but bronchiectasis is a frequent phenomenon leading to a more severe disease with frequent exacerbations. The performance of thorax HRCT on patients with severe asthma can help to evaluate management strategies for the disease in order to imp...
Source: Journal of Asthma - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Asthma Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Poorer humoral immune responses to PPSV-23 as measured by fold change were more likely to be observed in subjects with asthma compared to controls. We recommend the consideration of asthma status when interpreting vaccine response for immune competence workup through larger studies. Further studies are warranted to replicate these findings. PMID: 30784333 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Journal of Asthma - Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: J Asthma Source Type: research
Potential signs of asthma in babies include flared nostrils, lethargy, and coughing. Learn more about the signs of asthma in babies and when to see a doctor here.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Asthma Source Type: news
Young people in the UK are more likely to die from asthma or have a poor quality of life from long-term conditions compared to counterparts in other high-income countries.
Source: Nursing Times - Category: Nursing Source Type: news
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Dr Weinberger disagrees with my assertion that large studies1 –5 demonstrating the safety of combination inhaled glucocorticoid (IGC) and long-acting–agonist (LABA) therapy are compelling because they did not include patients with life-threatening asthma. Dr Weinberger describes a case report he published in 2006 of 2 children with poorly controlled asthma despite high-dose IGC and LABA combination therapy who developed life-threatening episodes of bronchospasm after exercise that were not prevented by albuterol pretreatment.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
Spahn1 describes the long and winding road related to the controversies of the inhaled corticosteroid (IC) LABA combination. He states that the large studies demonstrating the safety of the combination are compelling.2 –4 However, because those studies specifically excluded patients with previous life-threatening reactions, I want to draw attention to the observations my colleague and I previously reported in 2 boys, aged 10 and 15 years, with a previous history of life-threatening asthmatic exacerbations while receiving a LABA with an IC.
Source: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
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