Some people are burning 5G towers out of concern the electropollution might be worsening the coronavirus outbreak

(Natural News) Fears about 5G radiation towers inducing or exacerbating the symptoms associated with the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) are driving some people to light the technology on fire in acts of protest. In Birmingham, England, for instance, a 5G mast that went up in flames the other day was captured on video as it burnt...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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A World Health Organization scientist said Covid-19 comes from bats and can infect cats and ferrets, but more research is needed into the suspected animal link to the disease. The novel coronavirus comes from a group of viruses that originate or spread in bats, and it’s still unclear what animal may have transmitted the disease to humans, Peter Ben Embarek, a WHO expert in animal diseases that jump to humans, said Friday in a briefing with reporters. The virus probably arrived in humans through contact with animals raised for food supply, though scientists have yet to determine which species, he said. Studies have sh...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news
It was supposed to be a blockbuster moment for the U.S. plastic industry. With an abundance of cheap natural gas at hand, thanks to the country’s fracking boom, U.S. energy giants were pouring billions of dollars into building new plants to turn that gas into plastic. As the world was poised to slowly turn away from fossil fuels as an energy source, plastic seemed to be a feasible replacement and possibly even a potential cash cow—overseas, demand for plastic was projected to explode in the coming decades. But the rosy projections may not be panning out. With the oil industry in freefall, and a pandemic grippin...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Source Type: news
There is both promise and peril in being a pioneer, and the people of Hokkaido have learned both lessons well over the past few months. After infections of COVID-19 on the Japanese island exploded following its annual winter festival this year, officials in February declared a state of emergency to control the disease. Soon after, new daily cases plummeted, and Hokkaido’s quick action was heralded as a beacon for the rest of Japan to follow. But it wasn’t just infections that dropped; over the next month, agriculture and tourism business also dried up, and Hokkaido’s governor decided to ease social restri...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news
(WASHINGTON) — Another Navy ship at sea has reported a coronavirus outbreak and is returning to port, the Navy said Friday. Navy officials said at least 18 members of the crew of a destroyer, the USS Kidd, have tested positive and it expects the number to grow. It said it is evaluating the extent of the outbreak aboard the ship. The Kidd is off the Pacific coast of Central America, where it has been operating as part of a U.S. counter-drug mission. The Navy said it has a crew of about 350. It is only the second Navy ship, among about 90 deployed around the world, to report a coronavirus outbreak at sea. The other is ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Military News Desk wire Source Type: news
Preliminary data from China suggest that people with diabetes and other preexisting conditions are more likely to experience serious complications and death from COVID-19 than people without diabetes and other conditions. But COVID-19 and the coronavirus that causes it are new, and researchers are still investigating how they impact immunity. We also know that if a person has diabetes and gets influenza or another infection, they can experience worse health outcomes. The question is why. High blood sugars can interfere with white blood cells’ ability to fight infection. So there’s a possibility that people with...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Health Source Type: blogs
(BOISE, Idaho) — They are two disasters that require opposite responses: To save lives and reduce the spread of COVID-19, people are being told to remain isolated. But in a wildfire, thousands of firefighters must work in close quarters for weeks at a time. Wildfires have already broken out in Texas and Florida, and agencies are scrambling to finish plans for a new approach. They are considering waivers for some training requirements to previously-certified crew members, and moving some training online. Other proposals include limiting fire engines to a driver and one passenger, requiring other crew members to ride i...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Environment News Desk wire Source Type: news
Note to our Biomedical Beat readers: Echoing the sentiments NIH Director Francis Collins made on his blog, NIGMS is making every effort during the COVID-19 pandemic to keep supporting the best and most powerful science. In that spirit, we’ll continue to bring you stories across a wide range of NIGMS topics. We hope these posts offer a respite from the coronavirus news when needed. Scientific research requires many resources, which all require funding. Credit: Michele Vaughan. Scientific inspiration often strikes unexpectedly. The Greek mathematician and inventor Archimedes first thought of the principles of vo...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Being a Scientist Scientific Process Training Source Type: blogs
(WASHINGTON) — The captain of a U.S. Navy aircraft carrier facing a growing outbreak of the coronavirus was fired Thursday by Navy leaders who said he created a panic by sending his memo pleading for help to too many people. Navy Secretary Thomas Modly said the ship’s commander, Capt. Brett Crozier “demonstrated extremely poor judgement” in the middle of a crisis. He said the captain copied too many people on the memo, which was leaked to a California newspaper and quickly spread to many news outlets. He said Crozier should have gone directly to his immediate commanders, who were already moving to h...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News Desk wire Source Type: news
Runaway exponential growth. Unprecedented economic impacts. Untold deaths and suffering, especially among the poor and vulnerable. All these superlatives are sadly apt descriptors for the COVID-19 crisis unfolding in front of our eyes. They also apply to climate change. But while the slowdown in activity due to COVID-19 has led to a temporary fall in China’s carbon dioxide emissions by up to a quarter, that’s not a fact worth celebrating. Nothing in this current crisis looks remotely like success. When it comes to climate change, the relentless rise in global temperatures is but one harbinger of what is to come...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news
Before COVID-19 swept across western Europe and caused schools and bars to close across the United States, it threatened East and Southeast Asia. Millions of Americans and Europeans are now learning to cope with changes to their daily lives brought on by coronavirus precautions—changes that have been a reality since January or February across mainland China and in places like Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan. For weeks, in many places across Asia, children have been home from school, employees have been working from home and people have been learning to conduct their lives amid the outbreak. With that in mind, here ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight Source Type: news
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