A good night's sleep linked to better memory, especially in the elderly

(Natural News) Many Americans get less than the recommended amount of sleep. Poor sleep has been linked to a variety of chronic diseases like heart disease, obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Now, recent research suggests that poor sleep can also deteriorate memory performance, especially in older adults. The National Sleep Foundation‘s inaugural Sleep Health Index...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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By Emma Young We all know that too little sleep is bad for us. Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley sleep scientist and author of the best-selling Why We Sleep, has gone so far as to declare: “The shorter you sleep, the shorter your life.” However, some researchers fear that our concerns about not getting enough sleep are becoming overblown — and that, ironically, they could be making the problem worse. In this feature, we take a look at evidence that “too little” sleep isn’t always the disaster that it’s held up to be. It’s not always about a lack of sleep You’ll be fami...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Feature Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs
Much more than just a cosmetic issue, obesity is associated with type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, fatty liver disease, sleep apnea, arthritis, gallbladder disease and more, according to the U.S. National Institute for Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
Source: WebMD Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Obesity rates have nearly doubled in the last 20 years. Only in England, 13 million people over the age of 16 were considered obese in 2017, Daily Mail reported. According to an analysis of government data, the NHS spent a staggering £1.075 billion on type 2 diabetes treatment alone. And since obesity is linked to cardiovascular problems, diabetes, and some cancers, most of us live in countries where obesity kills more people than malnutrition. It’s preventable. It’s treatable. And yet numbers keep rising. So, what’s happening and what’s the solution? Let’s get digital! Ok, we may ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers digital health digital technology digital health sensors weight management obesity weight loss Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, older adults exhibited decreased markers of UPR activation and reduced coordination with autophagy and SC-associated gene transcripts following a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise. In contrast, young adults demonstrated strong coordination between UPR genes and key regulatory gene transcripts associated with autophagy and SC differentiation in skeletal muscle post-exercise. Taken together, the present findings suggest a potential age-related impairment in the post-exercise transcriptional response that supports activation of the UPR and coordination with other exercise responsive pathways (i.e....
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Humans have made many dietary mistakes over the years but two mistakes, in particular, stand out: close contact with animals, mostly ruminants, who conveyed their diseases to us and the adoption of the seeds of grasses as human food. These two practices not only changed the course of human history but also human disease. Over the last several centuries, Westerners have populated North America, South America, Pacific islands and other regions. Equipped with superior tools of warfare such as swords and muskets, contact with Westerners decimated indigenous people such as the millions of native Americans, Aztecs, and Amazonian...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle gluten-free grain-free grains joint pain Source Type: blogs
Conclusions Aging leads to a progressive decrease in androgen production that, in turn, leads to the development of LOH, defined by significant low T serum levels (in the lowest quartile) in the presence of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism (51). LOH could be due to both testicular and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction (32), and ED is one of its main symptoms. ED in LOH is linked to increased oxidative stress, subclinical inflammation, and subsequent endothelial dysfunction (101). In elderly men, it has been shown that LOH is also linked to lower cAMP pool and to an alteration of the cGMP signaling pathway. PDE5 gene l...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Shafqat Ahmad1,2,3*, Syeda Sadia Fatima4, Gull Rukh5 and Caren E. Smith6 1Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden 2Preventive Medicine Division, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States 3Department of Nutrition, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, United States 4Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan 5Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden 6Nutrition and Genomics Laboratory, Jean Mayer U. S. Depa...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
This study provides a possible reason why genes carrying health risks have persisted in human populations. The second found evidence for multiple variants in genes related to ageing that exhibited antagonistic pleiotropic effects. They found higher risk allele frequencies with large effect sizes for late-onset diseases (relative to early-onset diseases) and an excess of variants with antagonistic effects expressed through early and late life diseases. There also exists other recent tangible evidence of antagonistic pleiotropy in specific human genes. The SPATA31 gene has been found under strong positive genomic sele...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
When Tom Shicowich’s toe started feeling numb in 2010, he brushed it off as a temporary ache. At the time, he didn’t have health insurance, so he put off going to the doctor. The toe became infected, and he got so sick that he stayed in bed for two days with what he assumed was the flu. When he finally saw a doctor, the physician immediately sent Shicowich to the emergency room. Several days later, surgeons amputated his toe, and he ended up spending a month in the hospital to recover. Shicowich lost his toe because of complications of Type 2 diabetes as he struggled to keep his blood sugar under control. He wa...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized health Nutrition Source Type: news
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