Using antidepressants while pregnant can increase the risk of autism in newborns – study

(Natural News) Pregnant women can add antidepressants to their laundry list of things to avoid during pregnancy. The results of a recent study revealed that babies exposed to the pharmaceutical drug fluoxetine in the womb could develop autistic-like behavior later on. The study, published in the journal Molecular Brain, also identified a potential therapy for the problem,...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Conclusions: Our study corroborates previous findings of a positive association between early life air pollution exposure and ASD, and identifies a potential critical window of exposure during the late prenatal and early postnatal periods.
Source: Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Mental Health Source Type: research
Immune dysfunction and abnormal immune response may be associated with certain mechanisms underlying autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The early evidence for this link was based on the increased incidence of ASD in children with a history of maternal infection during pregnancy. Observational studies show increased prevalence of immune-related disorders—ranging from atopy, food allergy, viral infections, asthma, primary immunodeficiency, to autoimmune disorders—in individuals with ASD and their families. Evidence of neuroglial activation and focal brain inflammation in individuals with ASD implies that the central...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
ConclusionOur findings support increased paternal BMI negatively affecting pregnancy and child health outcomes. Future studies must include or adjust for paternal contributions, as the longstanding assumption that only maternal factors are relevant is likely to have considerably confounded prior work.
Source: Obesity Research and Clinical Practice - Category: Eating Disorders & Weight Management Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: Reproductive ToxicologyAuthor(s): Mei Tan, Ting Yang, Jiang Zhu, Qiu Li, Xi Lai, Yuanyuan Li, Ting Tang, Jie Chen, Tingyu LiAbstractTo explore possible associations between maternal use of micronutrient supplements and the subsequent vitamin levels and symptoms in offspring with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a total of 416 children with ASD and 201 typically developing (TD) children were enrolled. The children born to mothers without folic acid (FA) and micronutrient supplementation during pregnancy had more severe social cognition impairments, social communicati...
Source: Reproductive Toxicology - Category: Toxicology Source Type: research
ConclusionResults of this investigation support the possible negative effect of high levels of maternal FA supplementation during pregnancy and lactation. Such alterations potentially lead to neurobehavioural changes in the adult offspring of Wistar rats.
Source: Journal of Taibah University Medical Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: research
Authors: Brodowski L, Büter W, Kohls F, Hillemanns P, von Kaisenberg C, Dammann O Abstract Maternal overweight and obesity are prenatal risk factors for obstetrical complications, preterm birth, neonatal morbidity as well as cognitive and behavioural developmental disorders in children. Paediatric morbidity and mortality as well as child development disorders are significantly associated with maternal obesity. Particularly in the neurodevelopmental and psychiatric area, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in children of mothers with an increased body mass index (BMI), there is a high correlation with child...
Source: Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde - Category: OBGYN Tags: Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd Source Type: research
Abstract Over the last decade there has been an increase in the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, its pathogenic mechanisms remain unclear. To date, no effective drug has been developed to treat the core symptoms of ASD, especially social interaction deficits. Previous studies have mainly focused on the glutamatergic, GABAergic, and serotonergic signaling pathways; however, a growing number of studies have reported abnormalities in the dopaminergic pathway, such as mutations and functional alterations of dopamine-related molecules, in ASD patients. Furthermore, atypical antipsychotic drugs ris...
Source: Yakugaku Zasshi : Journal of the Pharmaceutical Society of Japan - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Yakugaku Zasshi Source Type: research
To the Editor Preterm birth increases risk of neurodevelopmental delays. High-risk pregnancies for preeclampsia development are at increased risk of preterm birth, the rate of which is dependent on the definitions and screening criteria. Voutetakis et al raise concern of a potential long-term effect of aspirin given to prevent preterm preeclampsia in high-risk pregnancies owing to disruption of cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 and prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) signaling, potentially affecting prenatal and postnatal brain development with subsequent neurodevelopmental impairments. There are some considerations for this argument. Several pr...
Source: JAMA Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
AbstractExposure to gestational stress is implicated in increased risk for neuropsychiatric disorders in offspring. We assessed association between prenatal exposure to a 1-month period of repeated rocket attacks during the 2006 Second Lebanon War in Northern Israel and emergence of childhood neuropsychiatric disorders from birth through 9  years of age. Children born to women who were pregnant during the war (N = 6999) were identified and compared to children in the same district born a year later (N = 7054), whose mothers were not exposed to rocket attacks during pregnancy. Multivariable ...
Source: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
A former UCSF medical student, Carolyn Rees, now a doc in rural Idaho, wrote me a very informative letter — and raised several interesting questions — that are definitely worth a little discussion here. Dr. Rees asked: Is there any evidence that ultrasound examination can affect brain development? In fact, that evidence is mixed. Over the past 15-25 years, a number of smaller studies conducted principally in North America recorded cognitive and language impairments in children that were attributable to ultrasound examination — while results in several other subsequent large studies conducted principally i...
Source: On the Brain by Dr. Michael Merzenich, Ph.D. - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Aging and the Brain Brain Fitness BrainHQ Cognitive Impairment in Children Cognitive impairments Language Development Reading and Dyslexia Source Type: blogs
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