You are 6x more likely to suffer a heart attack or stroke 3 days after the flu: Study

(Natural News) A new study has found that people who have just had the flu are up to six times more likely to have a stroke or heart attack. In the biggest study to look at stroke and heart attack risk from specific respiratory infections, researchers found that some of the organisms that can cause...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Publication date: August 2018 Source:American Heart Journal, Volume 202 Author(s): Shenshen Li, James A. Blumenthal, Chuan Shi, Danielle Millican, Xian Li, Xin Du, Anushka Patel, Pei Gao, Elizabeth Delong, Pallab K. Maulik, Runlin Gao, Xin Yu, Yangfeng Wu Depression and acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are both common public health challenges. Patients with ACS often develop depression, which in turn adversely affects prognosis. Low-cost, sustainable, and effective service models that integrate depression care into the management of ACS patients to reduce depression and improve ACS outcomes are critically needed. Integratin...
Source: American Heart Journal - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
A new study suggests that marriage may prevent heart disease and stroke, as well as prolong life for people who had a heart attack.
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart Disease Source Type: news
People who are married may be less likely to develop cardiovascular disease or die from a heart attack or stroke than individuals who aren't, a research review suggests.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
Married people may be less likely to develop cardiovascular disease or die from a heart attack or stroke than individuals who aren't, a research review suggests.
Source: CBC | Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news
TUESDAY, June 19, 2018 -- For adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), acute exacerbations are associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke, according to a study published online May 3 in the Annals of...
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
AbstractPurpose of ReviewCannabis and cannabinoids have been used medically and recreationally for thousands of years and recently there has been a growing body of research in this area. With increased access now that medical marijuana is available in many jurisdictions, patients and providers want to know more about the evidence for benefits and risks of cannabinoid use. This paper provides an overview of the available cannabinoid-based formulations, a summary of the highest quality evidence for the use of cannabinoids for treating spasticity and pain associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), and a discussion of possible d...
Source: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Marital status should be included as a risk factor, say authors Related items fromOnMedica Loneliness itself appears not to raise risk of heart attack/stroke RCGP calls for government action to tackle loneliness Single fathers have highest risk of early death Marriage and divorce trigger weight gain Single people have a higher risk of dementia
Source: OnMedica Latest News - Category: UK Health Source Type: news
(Reuters Health) - People who are married may be less likely to develop cardiovascular disease or die from a heart attack or stroke than individuals who aren't, a research review suggests.
Source: Reuters: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: NIH Cancels Large Alcohol/Heart Health Study A $100-million study into whether alcohol protects against heart attack and stroke has been canceled...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
ConclusionIn patients with RSNOFC, CEA may be considered a potential treatment option. Although procedural risks in this small subgroup may be higher as compared to patients with low-to-moderate risk anatomy, this risk may outbalance the natural course.
Source: Journal of Neurology - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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