Use of most-prescribed diabetes drug, metformin, during pregnancy found to increase risk of obesity in the child

(Natural News) According to the results of a study, women who take metformin, a common diabetes medication, could be putting their children at increased risk of being obese or overweight. More pregnant women with gestational diabetes or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are taking metformin to treat their conditions. PCOS usually causes infertility, and the condition can put...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Jie Cai1†, Yi Zhang1†, Yuying Wang1, Shengxian Li1, Lihua Wang1, Jun Zheng1, Yihong Jiang1, Ying Dong1, Huan Zhou1, Yaomin Hu1, Jing Ma1, Wei Liu1,2*† and Tao Tao1*† 1Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Pudong, China 2Shanghai Key Laboratory for Assisted Reproduction and Reproductive Genetics, Center for Reproductive Medicine, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Pudong, China Background: Infertility and dyslipidemia are frequently present in both women...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In addition to pharmacological interventions, long-term standardized individualized management of PCOS patients is needed to achieve fertility and reduce the risk of metabolic related diseases. PMID: 30706800 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder associated with poor reproductive outcomes, including infertility and pregnancy complications, and poor metabolic outcomes, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. Prevalence estimates for PCOS range from 7% to 15% of reproductive-age women worldwide, depending on the diagnostic criteria used. Accordingly, PCOS-associated dysglycemia and obesity are a global public health risk. Despite the public health importance of PCOS, notable gaps exist in the literature regarding its pathophysiology, natural history, and optimal management.
Source: Fertility and Sterility - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reflections Source Type: research
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a complex endocrine condition that represents a lifelong health concern for 1 in 10 women worldwide.1 PCOS is commonly diagnosed by the presence of ovulatory dysfunction, androgen excess, and/or ovaries with polycystic morphology on ultrasound examination.2 Half of patients experience overweight or obesity.3 Most are at increased risk for serious comorbidities, including infertility, pregnancy complications (eg, gestational diabetes mellitus), impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, gynecological cancers, anxiety, depression, eati...
Source: Journal of the American Dietetic Association - Category: Nutrition Authors: Tags: Research Source Type: research
One of the commonest questions which patients ask me is - What ispolycystic ovariandisease (or PCO, also known as PCOD and PCOS? ) And what are its risks ?This has now become a very common diagnosis, and is made by gynecologists, dietitians, skin specialists and GPs as well. The diagnosis is made typically for young girls, who are worried because they irregular periods; are a little bit overweight; or have acne or some oily skin. Doctors order a panel of expensive blood tests ( which measure hormones levels such as FSH, LH, DHEA, testosterone and AMH), and these often turn out to be abnormal in these girls.The problem...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs
Abstract Context: Women with PCOS are at increased risk for pregnancy complications possibly related to pre-existing obesity and potentially to excessive gestational weight gain (GWG). Objectives: To assess the contributions of pre-existing diagnosis and preconception weight on GWG and perinatal outcomes. Research Design and Methods: Prospective cohort study of singleton pregnancies in PCOS(N =164) and ovulatory controls(N = 176) conceiving from infertility treatment. Main Outcome measures: GWG, birthweight, pregnancy complications. Results: From pre-conception baseline, normal-weight PCOS women gai...
Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
Men and women follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and can undergo important and sometime startling hormonal changes. Though results vary with stage of life—young adults, middle-aged, older—there are a variety of hormonal changes that women and men typically experience, some in concert, others independently. Such hormonal shifts can be powerful and part of the health-restoring menu of changes that develop with this lifestyle. They can even improve a relationship in a number of ways, both physically and emotionally, especially if we weave in some of the newer Wheat Belly/Undoctored concepts and practices such as oxy...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Wheat Belly Lifestyle estradiol estrogen hormonal hormones Inflammation low-carb oxytocin testosterone Thyroid Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
Authors: Liu K, Motan T, Claman P Abstract OBJECTIVES: To review the etiology, evaluation, and treatment of hirsutism. EVALUATION: A thorough history and physical examination plus selected laboratory evaluations will confirm the diagnosis and direct treatment. TREATMENT: Pharmacologic interventions can suppress ovarian or adrenal androgen production and block androgen receptors in the hair follicle. Hair removal methods and lifestyle modifications may improve or hasten the therapeutic response. OUTCOMES: At least 6 to 9 months of therapy are required to produce improvement in hirsutism. EVIDENCE: Th...
Source: Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Canada : JOGC - Category: OBGYN Tags: J Obstet Gynaecol Can Source Type: research
By Katrina Mark, MD 1. Fertility naturally declines as we age That alone doesn’t mean you should start to worry. The general advice I give a woman is if she has been trying to become pregnant for a full year with no luck, she might consider a fertility evaluation. For a woman over age 35, she might consider it after six months. If a woman is younger and has irregular periods, it’s likely she isn’t regularly ovulating, so she might want to be evaluated sooner. 2. Sometimes there’s a reason for infertility – and sometimes, there’s not There are some things we know cause infertility. About...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Women's Health fertility Katrina Mark obgyn UMMC Source Type: blogs
DiscussionPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 6-8% of reproductive-age women making it the most common endocrinopathy in this age group. There is no consensus on the specific diagnostic criteria for PCOS in adolescents as many of the characteristics overlap with normal adolescent physiology. However, patients should have evidence of hyperandrogenism, oligo- or amenorrhea, and potentially polycystic ovaries. PCOS has a genetic component although a specific gene has not been identified. Incidence of PCOS is 20-40% for a woman with a family history. Hyperandrogenism Androgen levels change during puberty therefore actual ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
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