Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Confirmed: Hormone replacement drugs, pushed heavily by doctors and pharma, found to accelerate the growth of breast cancer cells

(Natural News) Hormone replacement therapy is often touted for any number of things; these kinds of drugs are often given to women under the guise of reducing heart disease risk and minimizing the effects of menopause, for example. But are they really safe? While hormone replacement therapy (HRT) first gained popularity for reducing signs of...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Related Links:

Conclusions: The summary index of risks versus benefits was similar for oral CEE versus oral or transdermal E2-containing regimens. CEE + P containing less than 0.625 mg/d of CEE (vs 0.625 mg/d) for less than 5 years appeared safer.
Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs
The pendulum has swung from one extreme to the other when it comes to hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat symptoms of menopause. At first, the replacement hormones—mostly a combination of estrogen and progestin to replace what the body stops making after menopause—were seen as a panacea. Doctors thought they could not only relieve hot flashes and night sweats, but also prevent chronic aging diseases like heart problems and weakening bones. But studies then found that the supplement hormones could lead to a higher risk of breast cancer—and that they didn’t protect the heart after all. In the l...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs estrogen Hormone Therapy hormones for menopause hot flashes night sweats progestin Reproductive Health treating menopause Source Type: news
This study, the first to examine potential adverse health effects in users of vaginal estrogen compared with non-users, suggests that vaginal estrogen therapy is a safe treatment for genitourinary symptoms such as burning, discomfort, and pain during intercourse associated with menopause.AUTHORSThe paper ’s authors are Dr. Carolyn Crandall of UCLA; Kathleen Hovey of the State University of New York at Buffalo; Christopher Andrews of the University of Michigan; Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of City of Hope; Marcia Stefanick of Stanford University; Dr. Dorothy Lane of the State University of New York at Ston y Brook; Dr. Jan Sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Abstract The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Draft Recommendation statement on Menopausal Hormone Therapy: Primary Prevention for Chronic Diseases, released in May 2017, perpetuates a major disconnect between the primary population affected, women within roughly 10 years of menopause, and the data cited. Furthermore, major elements of the evidence relied upon have been misinterpreted or misstated, particularly in regard to coronary heart disease and breast cancer, for which there is no statistically significant evidence of harm. As currently drafted, the recommendations reiterate the USPSTF statements o...
Source: Climacteric - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Climacteric Source Type: research
FINDINGSWhen it comes to assessing the risk of estrogen therapy for menopause, how the therapy is delivered — taking a pill versus wearing a patch on one’s skin — doesn’t affect risk or benefit, researchers at UCLA and elsewhere have found. But with the commonly used conjugated equine estrogen, plus progestogen, the dosage does. Higher doses, especially over time, are associated with greater risk of problems, including heart disease and some types of cancer, especially among obese women.BACKGROUNDThe Women ’s Health Initiative established the potential of estrogen therapy to increase or decrea...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
More than 100 women die of breast cancer in the U.S. every day. It's the second leading cause of cancer deaths in American women. But in my opinion, many of those women really die of a tragic medical error. Let me explain… Millions of women in the U.S. have taken Big Pharma's hormone replacement therapy (HRT). Their doctors prescribe it to try to relieve the symptoms of menopause. Like hot flashes, night sweats, mood swings and weight gain. But what the drug companies try to pass off as hormones are actually synthetic concoctions. They are fake versions of the estrogen and progesterone that your body makes ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Tags: Anti-Aging Source Type: news
Abstract Prior to the unexpected early termination of the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) trial of continuous conjugated equine estrogens (CEE) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), the prevailing view was that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was a low-risk intervention with immediate value for symptom relief in recently menopausal women, and that it probably conferred long-term protection against the major chronic diseases that affect women after menopause. Rather than replicating prior studies, the WHI was designed to test whether the beneficial associations consistently seen in women starting HRT near menopa...
Source: Climacteric - Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tags: Climacteric Source Type: research
Conclusion Current population risk assessment of dietary Cd intake relies on estimates of dietary Cd intake and/or maintenance of threshold levels of urinary Cd that should protect the kidney from Cd-induced damage. Risk assessment using dietary Cd intake estimates has been questioned because they show only a marginal correlation with urinary Cd levels, a well-founded measure of lifetime intakes. Blood Cd levels, however, show a correlation with urinary Cd levels, and they could thus be of value in risk assessment; blood Cd levels ≥ 1 μg/L were associated with CKD, while blood Cd levels above 0.5 μg/L were associa...
Source: EHP Research - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Commentaries March 2017 Source Type: research
Conclusions: The occurrence of MI is very low in this cohort (4.4%), reassuring the clinicians that the older adults with comorbidities may not be at a higher risk of MI with adjuvant endocrine therapy. However, the confidence interval for the hazard ratio of AIs vs Tamoxifen is very wide, indicating that a larger sample may be needed for the power of the study to be conclusive.Citation Format: Kamaraju S, Smith E, Shi Y, Laud P, Neuner J. Are aromatase inhibitors associated with higher myocardial infarction risk in breast cancer patients? A Medicare population study [abstract]. In: Proceedings of the Thirty-Ninth Annual C...
Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Poster Discussion Abstracts Source Type: research
More News: Breast Cancer | Cancer | Cancer & Oncology | Cardiology | Heart | Heart Disease | Hormone Replacement Therapy | Hormones | Men | Menopause | Pharmaceuticals | Women