Oral Hygiene and Dysphagia —Care and Complications
In a recent online chat, John R. Ashford emphasized the importance of good oral hygiene to the overall health of dysphagia patients and infection control. Participant: If a participant were to remember or put into practice only one idea from your session, what would that one key takeaway be? John R. Ashford: Every patient must receive oral hygiene. Not just for social or hygiene reasons, but as a preventative for complicating illnesses. Participant: What is your recommendation on alternating solids with water (or other liquid consistency) as a means of helping oral hygiene? Ashford: Of course, rinsing a...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - July 16, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: John Ashford Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia oral care oral hygiene Source Type: blogs

More Salivary Gland Engineering
Here is recent news of another team working to engineer salivary gland tissue, one of many parts of the body typically given little thought until it stops working. This team doesn't seem to be as close to a functional end result as the Japanese group I pointed out last month, but a diversity of approaches is always a good sign: Saliva is critical to good health. It helps with speaking, swallowing, washing food off teeth, initial food digestion and preventing oral infections. Insufficient saliva can cause chronic bad breath, cavities, gum disease, as well as systemic infections. There is no treatment for low-producing or n...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 28, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Towards Salivary Gland Regeneration
Tissue engineering is a field of many diverse research groups, each specializing in just a few types of tissue or organ structures. There is a great deal going on, and some of it is out of the public eye simply due to language barriers and the fact that more obscure or less important tissues are involved. It all still needs to be done, however: all of the body fails with age, and thus all tissues are a target for regenerative treatments. Take the work of this Japanese research group, for example: Salivary gland hypofunction, or xerostomia (dry mouth syndrome), induces various clinical problems, such as dental decay, bacte...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 2, 2015 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

NYU Researchers Develop New Assessment Tool to Combat Oral-Systemic Disease Across the Lifespan
The Interprofessional Oral Health Grant Team Challenges the Medical Profession to “Put the Mouth Back in the Head” in the American Journal of Public HealthImproving oral health is a leading population health goal; however, curricula preparing health professionals have a dearth of oral health content and clinical experiences. Funded by a grant from the Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA), New York University College of Nursing’s (NYUCN) Teaching Oral-Systemic Health (TOSH) Program is working to build interprofessional oral health workforce capacity which addresses a significant public health...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 26, 2015 Category: Dentists Source Type: blogs

Cases: Second-Line Anti-emetic Therapies for Refractory Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting (CINV)
Discussion:Nausea and vomiting (NV) are commonly reported side effects with chemotherapy.1 The primary pathway for NV involves the chemotherapy drugs directly stimulating the chemoreceptor trigger zone (CTZ), in the area postrema at the base of the fourth ventricle. Activated receptors in the CTZ transmit signals to the vomiting center in the brainstem to produce NV. Receptors in the CTZ include serotonergic receptor 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3), dopaminergic (D2) and neurokinin type 1 (NK-1) receptors. In addition, chemotherapy can damage GI mucosa causing local release of 5-HT3 neurotransmitters by gut enterochrom...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - August 25, 2014 Category: Palliative Carer Workers Authors: Christian Sinclair Source Type: blogs

Clinical aspects of the use of dental adhesive materials in patients with chronic xerostomia
This is a Good FYI for your older denture wearing patients. MJ Bogucki, Z. A. (2013), Clinical aspects of the use of dental adhesive materials in patients with chronic xerostomia. Gerodontology, 30: 162–166. doi: 10.1111/j.1741-2358.2012.00659.xAdhesives are commonly used by denture wearers to increase the retention and stability of the complete denture, to improve the chewing and masticatory abilities and to psychologically support the patient to make the complete denture more acceptable. Denture fixatives can be especially recommended for use and to aid retention for patients with dryness of the mouth, po...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - May 20, 2013 Category: Dentists Source Type: blogs